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Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 5th 09, 09:20 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,000
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)

I don't have a problem with cutting a hole in its heavy cast-metal(*?)
casing. I've already drilled a tapped a few holes in it and it seems
pretty strong.

*I don't think it's iron, but it is very heavy and magnetic (ferrous?).


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
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  #2  
Old April 5th 09, 10:27 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 428
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

"-MIKE-" wrote in message
...
I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)


The dust port on my Delta is right under the lower guides. It's an older BS,
'97 or so, a previous generation of build and features. It gets I'd say 90%
or better of the dust with a small shop vac. The DC pulls too much air
through the 1" port, making ti shriek and howl. Without the shop vac, the
air in the whole area looks to reach combustible levels of dust. Who
would've thought it? The other place I would consider is the opposite
"corner" of the bottom wheel guard, at the bottom rear by the hinge. It
should pull enough air past the lower guides to sweep the dust toward
itself, and also catch whatever made it past. Come to think of it, I think
I'll "fix" mine by putting a 2 1/2" port there.


  #3  
Old April 5th 09, 11:29 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 177
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

On Sun, 5 Apr 2009 16:27:28 -0500, "MikeWhy"
wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote in message
...
I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)


The dust port on my Delta is right under the lower guides. It's an older BS,
'97 or so, a previous generation of build and features. It gets I'd say 90%
or better of the dust with a small shop vac. The DC pulls too much air
through the 1" port, making ti shriek and howl. Without the shop vac, the
air in the whole area looks to reach combustible levels of dust. Who
would've thought it? The other place I would consider is the opposite
"corner" of the bottom wheel guard, at the bottom rear by the hinge. It
should pull enough air past the lower guides to sweep the dust toward
itself, and also catch whatever made it past. Come to think of it, I think
I'll "fix" mine by putting a 2 1/2" port there.

On my even older bandsaw I drill a 4" hole in the lower cover about
where the blade starts to make its turn. I got a 90 degree 4 inch
plastic port to attach to the dust collector. It works pretty well.
  #4  
Old April 6th 09, 01:27 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 607
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

-MIKE- wrote:
I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?


In general, you want to collect dust as close to the source of its
creation as possible. Some kind of shroud directly underneath the table
in the vicinity of the bottom guide bearings is going to be the most
effective location.

--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqboyee/
  #5  
Old April 6th 09, 05:27 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,168
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 15:20:57 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:


Damn good question, and you're going to get a lot of different answers..

I have the Ridgid and it comes with a tiny little port in the top of the bottom
wheel cover, kind of under the blade..
It doesn't suck, which in this case is a bad thing..

I did the 4" hole in the bottom wheel cover door, and it helped a lot, but
mostly by keeping the saw dust from building up in the lower wheel area..
I also put duct tape over the old DC port and around the seam where the lower
door meets the frame..
Not a lot of help in the "general dust" problem, though..

I ended up using a 4" Y and adding a 2nd DC port, which works well but looks
really funky.. It's a small cardboard box with a 4" hole in the back for the
hose and a rare earth magnet to hold it to whatever part of the saw I need it
on, as close to the lower blade guides as I can get it..
That's made a huge difference..


OH! Almost forgot... If you use the hole-in-the-door thing, don't use a zero
clearance plate unless you really need to..
As was pointed out here a few years ago, it sort of defeats the purpose of
trying to create a vacuum in the lower clamshell... YMWV



I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)

I don't have a problem with cutting a hole in its heavy cast-metal(*?)
casing. I've already drilled a tapped a few holes in it and it seems
pretty strong.

*I don't think it's iron, but it is very heavy and magnetic (ferrous?).



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
  #6  
Old April 6th 09, 05:57 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 177
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

Aren't the gullets of the blade supposed to pull the wood chips down
and out? I would think zero clearance on a bandsaw is not much
different than zero clearance on a table saw. Most of the chips should
go down and out and need to be collected underneath.

On Mon, 06 Apr 2009 09:27:01 -0700, mac davis
wrote:

On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 15:20:57 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:


Damn good question, and you're going to get a lot of different answers..

I have the Ridgid and it comes with a tiny little port in the top of the bottom
wheel cover, kind of under the blade..
It doesn't suck, which in this case is a bad thing..

I did the 4" hole in the bottom wheel cover door, and it helped a lot, but
mostly by keeping the saw dust from building up in the lower wheel area..
I also put duct tape over the old DC port and around the seam where the lower
door meets the frame..
Not a lot of help in the "general dust" problem, though..

I ended up using a 4" Y and adding a 2nd DC port, which works well but looks
really funky.. It's a small cardboard box with a 4" hole in the back for the
hose and a rare earth magnet to hold it to whatever part of the saw I need it
on, as close to the lower blade guides as I can get it..
That's made a huge difference..


OH! Almost forgot... If you use the hole-in-the-door thing, don't use a zero
clearance plate unless you really need to..
As was pointed out here a few years ago, it sort of defeats the purpose of
trying to create a vacuum in the lower clamshell... YMWV



I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)

I don't have a problem with cutting a hole in its heavy cast-metal(*?)
casing. I've already drilled a tapped a few holes in it and it seems
pretty strong.

*I don't think it's iron, but it is very heavy and magnetic (ferrous?).



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing

  #7  
Old April 6th 09, 06:06 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,000
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

mac davis wrote:
OH! Almost forgot... If you use the hole-in-the-door thing, don't use a zero
clearance plate unless you really need to..
As was pointed out here a few years ago, it sort of defeats the purpose of
trying to create a vacuum in the lower clamshell... YMWV


The doors (I can call them that, now) on this don't seal at all.
There is a good gap around the entire circumference.

I think I'd prefer to not put the hole in the door, since I'm going for
the most efficient blade change. That's one more thing to disconnect and
connect. I know, it's just slipping a hose on and off, but if I can
accomplish it, then why not?

The more I think about it, I'm wondering if I can connect a nozzle to
the bottom of the table, right beside the zero clearance insert hole.
That would keep the dust from piling up on the lower guides.

Since I'm using a shop vac, I could go with an 1-1/4 hose.
It gets everything my router can dish out.


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  #8  
Old April 6th 09, 08:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,037
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?


"-MIKE-" wrote in message
...
I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)

I don't have a problem with cutting a hole in its heavy cast-metal(*?)
casing. I've already drilled a tapped a few holes in it and it seems
pretty strong.

*I don't think it's iron, but it is very heavy and magnetic (ferrous?).



Regardless of where you add a port, I think you are always going to end up
having to open the saw up after use and vacuum out some areas, and the table
top will probably always have some dust. If the DC gets 95% you will be
doing good.
I have only witnessed a few tools that dust collection has worked with
99.99% effectiveness. My DC hooked up to my Delta stationary planer, My
Festool vac hooked up to my Domino and both Festool Sanders, Ah, one more,
My Festool Vac hooked up to my Kreg Pocket Hole jig.

My Laguna has the port on the bottom back side centered under the blade as
it goes back up to the top wheel. with any band saw, if you don't get it
all immediately after the cut the dust is going to be "fanned" by both upper
and lower wheels and you will end up with a little bit every where.


  #9  
Old April 6th 09, 08:42 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,000
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

Leon wrote:
Regardless of where you add a port, I think you are always going to end up
having to open the saw up after use and vacuum out some areas, and the table
top will probably always have some dust. If the DC gets 95% you will be
doing good.


I'd be happy with 90 percent. :-)


--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
--Elvin Jones (1927-2004)
--
http://mikedrums.com

---remove "DOT" ^^^^ to reply
  #10  
Old April 7th 09, 07:10 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,168
Default Best Place for Dust Port on Bandsaw?

On Mon, 06 Apr 2009 12:57:08 -0400, Jim Behning
wrote:

I think you also have the (added factor?) sawdust on the blade carried around
and dropped on the table, as well as some on the guides..

Not sure what the difference is, but when I widened the slot on my insert (not
intentionally, unfortunately) the dust got sucked off the blade area better..


Aren't the gullets of the blade supposed to pull the wood chips down
and out? I would think zero clearance on a bandsaw is not much
different than zero clearance on a table saw. Most of the chips should
go down and out and need to be collected underneath.

On Mon, 06 Apr 2009 09:27:01 -0700, mac davis
wrote:

On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 15:20:57 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:


Damn good question, and you're going to get a lot of different answers..

I have the Ridgid and it comes with a tiny little port in the top of the bottom
wheel cover, kind of under the blade..
It doesn't suck, which in this case is a bad thing..

I did the 4" hole in the bottom wheel cover door, and it helped a lot, but
mostly by keeping the saw dust from building up in the lower wheel area..
I also put duct tape over the old DC port and around the seam where the lower
door meets the frame..
Not a lot of help in the "general dust" problem, though..

I ended up using a 4" Y and adding a 2nd DC port, which works well but looks
really funky.. It's a small cardboard box with a 4" hole in the back for the
hose and a rare earth magnet to hold it to whatever part of the saw I need it
on, as close to the lower blade guides as I can get it..
That's made a huge difference..


OH! Almost forgot... If you use the hole-in-the-door thing, don't use a zero
clearance plate unless you really need to..
As was pointed out here a few years ago, it sort of defeats the purpose of
trying to create a vacuum in the lower clamshell... YMWV



I want to put a dust port on this wonderful Jet JBS-14mw.

Where's the best place to put a dust port?
I know I can look at pictures of other saws, but sometimes the wrong
engineers decide that. Like the guy responsible for making sure the case
can be stamped out in one pressing decides the port should be moved from
the most efficient location to a horrible spot.

My first clue is the pile of sawdust right underneath where the blade is
doing it's cutting. This thing doesn't "seal up" at all when the doors
close, so I don't think I can reply on vacuum pressure inside the
machine to move the dust very far. (Yeah, sounds like I answered my own
question, I know.)

I don't have a problem with cutting a hole in its heavy cast-metal(*?)
casing. I've already drilled a tapped a few holes in it and it seems
pretty strong.

*I don't think it's iron, but it is very heavy and magnetic (ferrous?).



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
 




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