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Painting celotex



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 8th 07, 05:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 17
Default Painting celotex

Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored, and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


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  #2  
Old October 8th 07, 06:35 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,770
Default Painting celotex

On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored, and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


You mean the Celotex insulation? If you're talking about the rigid
foam insulation, the manufacturers and code usually require it to be
covered by something like 1/2" drywall. It's basically tinder on your
walls. What exact product do you have? Since your shop is near the
property line (inferring that from 'on the corner of our lot') your
local codes may be more stringent than if it were elsewhere on the
property. Depends on your zoning, etc. More details would be
helpful.

R

  #3  
Old October 8th 07, 07:22 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 833
Default Painting celotex

William Andersen wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also,
where there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is
discolored, and paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been
using a brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the
future.


It has been decades since I saw that on walls and even longer since
painting it but IIRC it was oil prime, paint.

--

dadiOH
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dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
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  #4  
Old October 8th 07, 07:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 833
Default Painting celotex

RicodJour wrote:
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished
with celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent.
Also, where there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the
celotex is discolored, and paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been
using a brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in
the future.


You mean the Celotex insulation?


I think he has a material that was used in the 40s and 50s that was
made from plant residue. In Hawaii (where I was) they used bagasse
which is what's left of sugar cane after being de-juiced. Might have
been spelled "cellutex".

It came in 4x8 foot sheets like drywall and was used a lot for
ceilings. Had a slightly rough surface, very light. I've also seen
it for walls in sheets that had a phony shiplap appearance.

No idea about how flamable it was but I'm guessing it had some sort of
fire retardant incorporated into it.

--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico



  #5  
Old October 8th 07, 09:54 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 785
Default Painting celotex

On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored, and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.

  #6  
Old October 9th 07, 01:04 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 157
Default ==1 Painting celotex

On Mon, 08 Oct 2007 17:36:25 GMT, "dadiOH"
wrote:

RicodJour wrote:
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished
with celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent.
Also, where there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the
celotex is discolored, and paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been
using a brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in
the future.


You mean the Celotex insulation?


I think he has a material that was used in the 40s and 50s that was
made from plant residue. In Hawaii (where I was) they used bagasse
which is what's left of sugar cane after being de-juiced. Might have
been spelled "cellutex".

It came in 4x8 foot sheets like drywall and was used a lot for
ceilings. Had a slightly rough surface, very light. I've also seen
it for walls in sheets that had a phony shiplap appearance.

No idea about how flamable it was but I'm guessing it had some sort of
fire retardant incorporated into it.


I have an attached garage with my shop in it. The wall between the
house and the garage is sheathed in 1/2" thick Celotex. Its really
light weight crappy stuff. Holes have been punched in it throughout.
Mice have gotten into the wall and tunneled through the insulation. I
wouldnt recommend it to anyone. But its been painted a very cheery
yellow ever since before I've owned the house for 10 years. So it is
possible to paint it.

BTW, nowadays code requires 5/8" firestop drywall so this past summer
I ripped it all off the wall, did a bit of electrical work in the
wall, and put up drywall. Looks much nicer without the yellow.

-dickm
  #7  
Old October 9th 07, 06:34 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 17
Default Painting celotex

I'm pretty sure it's celotex. Not a smoothe surface and very light - it was
white in 1940. It may have been put up for it's insulation value; I thought
it was to provide an interior wall.
I don't know about the code.
It's already been painted with several different kinds of white paint. It
looks better than before it was painted and is brighter but still pretty
crappy looking.
I may replace it with wall board, since I'm probably going to rewire the
building, and service to it. If I do that, I'll insulate the walls first.


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.



  #8  
Old October 9th 07, 04:50 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 17
Default Painting celotex

thanks
"Roger amd Missy Behnke" wrote in message
...
If you want to use shellac try Zinsser BIN. Its a shellac based sealer
that will give it a bright white finish.


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using
a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.





  #9  
Old October 9th 07, 09:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 14
Default Painting celotex

On Oct 9, 9:50 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
thanks
"Roger amd Missy Behnke" wrote in ...



If you want to use shellac try Zinsser BIN. Its a shellac based sealer
that will give it a bright white finish.


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
roups.com...
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using
a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Bullseye shellac by Zinnser will do it. Available in big box builder
supply stores for about 12-15 bucks a gal. I have used it numerous
times to paint and seal andcover stains on ceiling tiles which are
typical of celotex type material without the asphalt added. Celotex
was an original material put out by Johns-Manville and was made from
processed corn stalks and leaves, and used for insulated sheathing on
homes etc. Usually sold in 1/2 x 4 x 8 sheets but they also offered a
25/32 or 1" thickness in tongue and groove sheets of 24" x 96" as
well.......

  #10  
Old October 9th 07, 09:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Painting celotex

On Oct 8, 11:34 pm, "William Andersen" wrote:
I'm pretty sure it's celotex. Not a smoothe surface and very light - it was
white in 1940. It may have been put up for it's insulation value; I thought
it was to provide an interior wall.
I don't know about the code.
It's already been painted with several different kinds of white paint. It
looks better than before it was painted and is brighter but still pretty
crappy looking.
I may replace it with wall board, since I'm probably going to rewire the
building, and service to it. If I do that, I'll insulate the walls first.

"Charlie Self" wrote in message

oups.com...



On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also, where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been using a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


They aoso made a product called Upsom board which was a white colored
sheet that was commonly used for interiior walls prior to sheetrock
days, and there is also a product called Homosote which came in a
variety of colors but most commonly a grey color which is pretty well
rot proof and was used for sofits and outside porch ceilings as well
as inside walls and ceilings. Both upson board and homosote are
light in weight and available in various thickness when it was made.
Both sucked up paints quick and shellac was a common primer used on it
back then.

 




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