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Painting celotex



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 10th 07, 12:30 AM posted to rec.woodworking
EXT
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Posts: 1,642
Default Painting celotex


"eekamouse" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Oct 9, 9:50 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
thanks
"Roger amd Missy Behnke" wrote in
...



If you want to use shellac try Zinsser BIN. Its a shellac based sealer
that will give it a bright white finish.


"Charlie Self" wrote in message
roups.com...
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also,
where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is
discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been
using
a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.


Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.- Hide
quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Bullseye shellac by Zinnser will do it. Available in big box builder
supply stores for about 12-15 bucks a gal. I have used it numerous
times to paint and seal andcover stains on ceiling tiles which are
typical of celotex type material without the asphalt added. Celotex
was an original material put out by Johns-Manville and was made from
processed corn stalks and leaves, and used for insulated sheathing on
homes etc. Usually sold in 1/2 x 4 x 8 sheets but they also offered a
25/32 or 1" thickness in tongue and groove sheets of 24" x 96" as
well.......

In the 1940, during the building boom there were a number of products that
competed for the low end market to replace expensive plaster. Most were
lightweight cardboard materials about 1/2" thick, even drywall started out
in this market and won.

The cellulose boards are similar to fiber ceiling tiles that are still sold
today for t-bar ceilings and it is still made as an asphalt impregnated
exterior wallboard to use under vinyl siding or brick veneer, although a
number of better products are in use today.


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  #12  
Old October 10th 07, 05:31 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 17
Default Painting celotex

Thanks for all of the replies.
Since I plan on rewiring the shop (some of the wire is the original fuzzy
fabric coated stuff and some is two wire only) I'll probably salvage what
celotex I can for the ceiling and then insulate the walls and cover them
with dry wall. My wife thinks that's a good idea, I can learn and practice
working with dry wall in the shop. I guess she has plans for the housse that
she hasn't told me about yet.
The shop is 90' from the house and the electric service is under ground. How
deep is anyone's guess. My father-in-law sometimes took shortcuts and
sometimes went way beyond what's necessary for a good job: I never know what
to expect when I look at some of his work. I've been replacing the 2 hole
outlets with 3 hole outlets, but most of the wire is only 2.
I plan on running new service to the building and replacing the 2 glass
fuses with a new service box and probably 4 circuits. The existing 2 means
if both main light fixtures are on, you won't be in the dark if 1 blows.
I'll check with an electrician, but I'd like to have 2 for lights and a
couple of outlets, 1 for my Shopsmith, 1 for ...

"EXT" wrote in message
anews.com...

"eekamouse" wrote in message
ps.com...
On Oct 9, 9:50 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
thanks
"Roger amd Missy Behnke" wrote in
...



If you want to use shellac try Zinsser BIN. Its a shellac based
sealer
that will give it a bright white finish.

"Charlie Self" wrote in message
roups.com...
On Oct 8, 11:43 am, "William Andersen" wrote:
Any ideas on how to paint celotex?
The shop I've inherited (on the corner of our lot) was finished with
celotex. I've tried painting it, but it is really absorbent. Also,
where
there had been water leaks from the ceiling, the celotex is
discolored,
and
paint doesn't cover the stains.
My intent is to paint it white to brighten up the shop. I've been
using
a
brush and roller, and I'm considering spraying paint in the future.

Shellac. Give it a good coat of shellac. You can then paint over the
shellac and the stains won't bleed, or at least not as badly.- Hide
quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Bullseye shellac by Zinnser will do it. Available in big box builder
supply stores for about 12-15 bucks a gal. I have used it numerous
times to paint and seal andcover stains on ceiling tiles which are
typical of celotex type material without the asphalt added. Celotex
was an original material put out by Johns-Manville and was made from
processed corn stalks and leaves, and used for insulated sheathing on
homes etc. Usually sold in 1/2 x 4 x 8 sheets but they also offered a
25/32 or 1" thickness in tongue and groove sheets of 24" x 96" as
well.......

In the 1940, during the building boom there were a number of products that
competed for the low end market to replace expensive plaster. Most were
lightweight cardboard materials about 1/2" thick, even drywall started out
in this market and won.

The cellulose boards are similar to fiber ceiling tiles that are still
sold today for t-bar ceilings and it is still made as an asphalt
impregnated exterior wallboard to use under vinyl siding or brick veneer,
although a number of better products are in use today.




 




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