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Leaving Air Compressor Full



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 27th 07, 01:50 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 221
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


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  #2  
Old April 27th 07, 01:57 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 71
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

On Apr 26, 6:50 pm, "Buck Turgidson" wrote:
Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


no

  #3  
Old April 27th 07, 02:47 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 35
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

On Apr 26, 7:57 pm, lwhaley wrote:
On Apr 26, 6:50 pm, "Buck Turgidson" wrote:

Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


no


I've been led to believe that the compressed air will create moisture/
condensation in the unit which obviously can do damage. I usually try
to remember to bleed mine.

  #4  
Old April 27th 07, 03:22 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 32
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

In article .com,
Doug wrote:

On Apr 26, 7:57 pm, lwhaley wrote:
On Apr 26, 6:50 pm, "Buck Turgidson" wrote:

Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially
because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor
full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


no


I've been led to believe that the compressed air will create moisture/
condensation in the unit which obviously can do damage. I usually try
to remember to bleed mine.


Porter Cable's instructions say to bleed it every day. I thought that
was a bit excessive, and left mine full for quite a while. The other
day, I emptied it, thinking some water might have built up. Indeed,
holding it up so the exhaust was at the bottom, a considerable amount of
water came out! Had to hold it over the sink. Perhaps I'll empty it like
that every few of weeks now.

--
Jedd Haas - Artist - New Orleans, LA
http://www.gallerytungsten.com
http://www.epsno.com
  #5  
Old April 27th 07, 03:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 25
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

Condensation building up in the tank, causing internal rust, eventually
leading to tank rupture, is a long term possibility. Compressors have a
drain valve on the tank for this reason.

--
Lloyd Baker

"Buck Turgidson" wrote in message
...
Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially because
I use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor
full. Does this do longterm harm to the machine?



  #6  
Old April 27th 07, 03:30 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 2,047
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

Buck Turgidson wrote:
Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


Yes and no.

Typically, the smaller the compressor, the less efficient, and the
more condensate it generates.

Not emptying the tank and bleeding off the condensate on a frequent
basis leads to problems.

Lew
  #7  
Old April 27th 07, 03:51 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 6,037
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full


"Doug" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Apr 26, 7:57 pm, lwhaley wrote:
On Apr 26, 6:50 pm, "Buck Turgidson" wrote:

Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially
because I
use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air compressor
full.
Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


no


I've been led to believe that the compressed air will create moisture/
condensation in the unit which obviously can do damage. I usually try
to remember to bleed mine.

You are on the right track.
Actually the compressed air does not create the condensation. It is the
heat generated from compressing the humid air that causes the condensation.
Take a glass of ice water out into a hot humid place and you will get
condensation on the outside of the glass. Once a compressor has stopped
running and cools the condensation stops. The longer the compressor runs
and the more heat generated the greater the condensation.
Soooo, if you let the compressor cool and bleed off just the excess
condensation there should be no more water build up when the compressor sets
idle.
Typically however, no one remembers to return to the compressor to bleed the
condensation after the compressor has cooled. Bleeding is a good practice
and total bleeding insures that you don't have to stand around waiting for
all the water to blow out.
Typically also, the faster and fewer times a compressor cycles the less
build up of condensation you will get regardless of the volume being
compressed.
If you fill an empty tank form a cool compressor tank that is not running,
there will be no condensation generated.



  #8  
Old April 27th 07, 04:09 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 442
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full


"scouter3" wrote in message
...
Condensation building up in the tank, causing internal rust, eventually
leading to tank rupture, is a long term possibility. Compressors have a
drain valve on the tank for this reason.

--
Lloyd Baker

"Buck Turgidson" wrote in message
...
Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially
because I use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air
compressor full. Does this do longterm harm to the machine?





  #9  
Old April 27th 07, 04:16 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 442
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full


"scouter3" wrote in message
...
Condensation building up in the tank, causing internal rust, eventually
leading to tank rupture, is a long term possibility. Compressors have a
drain valve on the tank for this reason.

--
Lloyd Baker

"Buck Turgidson" wrote in message
...
Partially out of laziness, inertia, procrastination, and partially
because I use it several times a month, I leave my Porter Cable air
compressor full. Does this do longterm harm to the machine?


I just disposed of one (an old one) that rusted through. It manifest itself
through a pin hole leak in the bottom of the tank. I think if it had been
bled properly through out it's life, it would still be here.
If the condensate is rusty color, you know it is rusting.

I never leave air in my pancake compressor now. The pancake is easy to
drain. The old tank required getting down in my knees and looking under the
tank. I should have piped the drain to a valve located in the open where I
could see it. I would have drained the tank more often.


  #10  
Old April 27th 07, 04:29 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 409
Default Leaving Air Compressor Full

Doug wrote:
I've been led to believe that the compressed air will create moisture/
condensation in the unit which obviously can do damage. I usually try
to remember to bleed mine.



Compressed air doesn't create moisture; it only compresses what already exists
in the atmosphere that day. The process of compression creates heat, which will
allow more moisture to stay in the vaporous state. Later, as the tank cools
down, that vapor may well condense since cool air can't hold as much moisture as
warm air.

As a former scuba instructor, I'd always taught my students to never let a tank
run completely empty as positive air pressure kept moist ambient air from
entering the tank. However scuba air is MUCH drier than shop air. Given that
shop compressors don't usually filter out moisture as scuba compressors do, it's
a bad practice to just let that moist air sit in the storage vessel, rusting it
out over time.

Bottom line... it's probably better to dump the air when you're done... at least
for shop compressors.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com


 




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