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Best tool for making picture frames?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 17th 07, 10:12 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 14
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?

I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.

TIA


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  #2  
Old April 17th 07, 10:24 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 1,186
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

steve wrote:

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.


Miter trimmer or else a handplane and shooting board.

Chris
  #3  
Old April 17th 07, 10:44 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 347
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 16:12:07 -0400, "steve" wrote:

I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?

I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.


A framing guillotine such as
http://www.frameco-online.com/shopusa/prod741.htm
But a flat sanding disc on the tablesaw would work too.

Mark
(sixoneeight) = 618
  #5  
Old April 17th 07, 11:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 360
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

of the tools you named, the tablesaw is your best bet.... assuming
it's a "professional" one with a cast iron top and a real motor.
getting the saw tuned up well enough to do what you want is a bit of
an adventure, but well worth it.

first, you have to get the saw tuned up. that's too big a topic for
this post, so I'll refer you to google:
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/search?
hl=en&group=rec.woodworking&q=%2Btable+%2Bsaw+%2Bt une+%2Bup&qt_g=Search
+this+group

then you need to have a suitable blade.

then you need to build yourself a miter sled.

  #6  
Old April 17th 07, 11:23 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 90
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 16:12:07 -0400, "steve" wrote:

I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?

I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.

TIA


There is such a tool for making picture frames. It has a large
sliding guillotine-like blade that moves when you pull the handle. It
can slice off a small amount without chipping. It might be called a
"picture frame trimmer." There are benchtop and floor models.
  #7  
Old April 17th 07, 11:26 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 108
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

On Apr 17, 4:12 pm, "steve" wrote:
I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?

I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.

TIA


Lion trimmer,
Pootatuck
company
http://www.lionmitertrimmer.com/

  #9  
Old April 17th 07, 11:38 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 6,037
Default Best tool for making picture frames?


"steve" wrote in message
...
I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so
I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?

I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....

So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.

TIA



I get great results with the TS, a top quality general purpose blade and a
better than stock miter gauge.

Picture frames can be very hard if you only shoot for making perfect 45's.

YOU MUST also make parallel sides EXACTLY the same length or the corners
will never come out right.

Use a stop on your sled or miter gauge fence to insure that the pieces being
cut are exactly the same length.


  #10  
Old April 17th 07, 11:56 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 109
Default Best tool for making picture frames?

On Apr 17, 4:38 pm, "Leon" wrote:
"steve" wrote in message

...

I've been making my own picture frames but the joints are off slightly so
I
have to resort to filling the joints and painting.
What would be a good way of making these cuts so the miters would line up
tight enough to be left natural or stained?


I've tried a hand miter box, My 10" power miter saw, my table saw....


So what is the best way to get that cut at exactly 45 degrees.


TIA


15 years ago I had a small picture framing shop, and I used a
Makita chop saw with a good carbide blade. These were the days before
I took up woodworking. It took two things to make a perfect corner,
equal sides, and a good 45 degree cut. Equally important!!! Each
frame was custom sized, so I could take some time, but I would trim
the lengths to well less than 1/16 inch difference. The standard "45"
degree stops on the saw wern't! I had to tweek the stop until it was
bang on. At least the saw was repeatable from cut to cut. It seemed
that it read 1/4 degree off the stop to make a good cut, yours may
vary.

Then there were tricks after assembly. On metal frames, the side
of a screwdriver was used to roll the corners, kind of like putting
the burr on a scraper. You could roll the ends together quite a bit.
You can do the same, a little, on wood, but the key there is wax
sticks in various colors used as a filler. They also take care of
nail holes, and come in a variety of colors.

I suggest you take some scrap wood, and see if you can get a
perfect 45 from your saw. It also might be a handy skill for other
stuff.

Hope this helps...

 




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