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How to stop squeaky furniture



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 31st 06, 01:49 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

I wasn't so sure how to title this as there could be a billion ways to
answer it wrong but I am faced with a squeaky furniture problem.

About 10 years ago, my father (God rest his soul) made my son a set of
bedroom furniture. The bed is made out of birch and birch plywood. It
has no box spring as there are drawer underneath it. The head foot
rails are connected to each other by a 3/4"x10" baord with fasteners
such as these:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...BDB&filter=bed

(Wow! I don't think that will work. They can be found at the Rockler
site and are called "Heavy Duty Wrought Steel Bed Rail Fasteners")

Anyway, recently, the bed squeaks like hell each time he makes the
slightest movement. When he roll over at night, it wakes up the whole
house and it is getting on everybody's nerves. I tightened every screw
I could see to no avail.

What is the secrect, if any, to stop this from happening??

busbus

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  #2  
Old January 31st 06, 03:04 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

My suggestion to stop the squeeking would be to mortise the piece
containing the two slots a little deeper.

I think this may work because what you're describing sounds like the
hooks are little too big to tightly mate onto the mating slots. The
metal is a little thin.

I'm glad you've pointed out this problem. I was just about to start
another bed project and I was looking for the "easy way" to join the
rails to the head and footboard. Not anymore. I think I'll stick
with mortise and tenon and the associated bed bolt.
  #3  
Old January 31st 06, 05:22 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

George Max writes:

I'm glad you've pointed out this problem. I was just about to start
another bed project and I was looking for the "easy way" to join the
rails to the head and footboard. Not anymore. I think I'll stick
with mortise and tenon and the associated bed bolt.


I'm not sure what you mean by "bed bolt."

The bed I repaired used dowels for alignment and Sheraton Bolts for
strength.

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=1096

You make a slot for the square bolt in the rail, and drill a hole in
the footboard/headboard. This allows the bed to be disassembled and/or
tightened.

Is M&T necessary? Or is it just a style/art/pride issue?

--
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  #4  
Old January 31st 06, 05:51 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

On 31 Jan 2006 17:22:07 GMT, Bruce Barnett
wrote:

George Max writes:

I'm glad you've pointed out this problem. I was just about to start
another bed project and I was looking for the "easy way" to join the
rails to the head and footboard. Not anymore. I think I'll stick
with mortise and tenon and the associated bed bolt.


I'm not sure what you mean by "bed bolt."

The bed I repaired used dowels for alignment and Sheraton Bolts for
strength.

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=1096

You make a slot for the square bolt in the rail, and drill a hole in
the footboard/headboard. This allows the bed to be disassembled and/or
tightened.

Is M&T necessary? Or is it just a style/art/pride issue?


This is *exactly* what I mean when I say bed bolt. However, given all
the stuff that happens to beds (jumping, sex, etc.) I prefer taking
the time to cut a good old mortise and tenon, then put in the bed
bolt.

I've seen clever variations that embed the bolt in the foot or
headboard, but basically, that's the same as running the bolt in from
outside.

What you're doing requires the bolt to not only pull the rail to the
head or foot, but resist shear forces (along with your dowels.) I
just don't trust dowels that much, nor would I want 1 bolt that might
come loose through racking, thermal cycling, whatever, be the thing
that keeps me up off the floor. That's the job for the M&T. Good
stout wood that's present anyway when you make the bed.

Check http://www.chbecksvoort.com/chairs.html for a picture of a
pencil post bed built by Christian Becksvoort. I've built 2 of those
for myself since he published the plans in Fine Woodworking. One for
LOML and I and 1 for daughter. That bed uses the bolt and a M&T.

Bed bolts and other hardware can be bought from Horton Brasses.
  #5  
Old January 31st 06, 06:08 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture


wrote:
I wasn't so sure how to title this as there could be a billion ways to
answer it wrong but I am faced with a squeaky furniture problem.

About 10 years ago, my father (God rest his soul) made my son a set of
bedroom furniture. The bed is made out of birch and birch plywood. It
has no box spring as there are drawer underneath it. The head foot
rails are connected to each other by a 3/4"x10" baord with fasteners
such as these:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...BDB&filter=bed

(Wow! I don't think that will work. They can be found at the Rockler
site and are called "Heavy Duty Wrought Steel Bed Rail Fasteners")

Anyway, recently, the bed squeaks like hell each time he makes the
slightest movement. When he roll over at night, it wakes up the whole
house and it is getting on everybody's nerves. I tightened every screw
I could see to no avail.

What is the secrect, if any, to stop this from happening??


A little grease, perhaps?

  #6  
Old January 31st 06, 06:16 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

Anyway, recently, the bed squeaks like hell each time he makes the slightest movement.

Maybe some wax? If it's a wood-on-wood squeaking, some candle wax or
maybe beeswax rubbed between the offending surfaces should help -
that's one solution for squeaking wood drawers. If it's a metallic
squeaking, (i.e. the bed rail fasteners are squeaking against each
other) you might need to mortise them in a little deeper and/or get
some grease between them (be careful it doesn't drip and mess up the
wood).
Good luck,
Andy

  #7  
Old January 31st 06, 06:50 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

Dang Google. I responded to this but it is unclear whether or not it
posted successfully.

George, I am glad I was able to help you! Unfortunately, since it is
probably too late, I won't be able to use the bed bolt option in
conjunction with the M&T--should have thnked of that when my dad built
it.

Your suggestion to mortise the one piece brings up a couple interesting
questions. First, the bed did not always squeak, that is a fairly
recent thing. It started about a year-and-a-half ago, long after it
was made. My first question is could it be possible that the fact that
he grew like a weed over that time to a solid 5' 9", 180 pound young
man--and still growing and eating and sleeping. I have to wonder if
this doesn't have a part to play in this?

Another question is: Could it be not from the mortise not being deep
enough but from the hardware being pulled, bent, and otherwise
misshapen and stretched? He did rearrange his bedroom all by himself a
few months back and it has been almost unbearable since then. I am
sure he tugged and pulled at the entire bed all at once: headrest,
footrest, side rails, the three LARGE drawers underneath it as well as
the plywood top and the mattress. That could explain the hooks not
fitting tightly...

Thanks for the response!!

  #10  
Old January 31st 06, 09:01 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default How to stop squeaky furniture

You may be right. I wonder if there is a way to incorporate some other
way to tie the footrail and headrail to the side rails? If I remember
correctly, I think that hardware is not hgolding all that much weight
and even if it did, everything wouldn't fall down in a heap because
there are boxes built underneath with drawers in them. If the bed
collapsed, it would fall all of maybe an inch, if that.

I know you said you wouldn't trust dowel rods but what about a BUNCH of
dowel rods? Or could there be another solution?


I guess I should just buy another set of those brackets but if that is
truely the problem, I don't know f I want to use them again.

 




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