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Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Saw Blade For Engineered Hardwood



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 6th 05, 10:04 PM
Amy L.
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Default Saw Blade For Engineered Hardwood

What type of blade do you recommend to cut 9/16" engineered hardwood. My
understanding is that a blade with more teeth will make a finer cut.
Looking over the blades at Lowes/depot it seems that most of the blades
~60-80 tooth would work fine. However, if more teeth is better than why not
use a plywood blade that has 180 teeth?

Sorry if this is a basic question.
Amy


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  #2  
Old October 6th 05, 10:15 PM
Dave Hinz
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On Thu, 6 Oct 2005 16:04:11 -0400, Amy L. wrote:
What type of blade do you recommend to cut 9/16" engineered hardwood.


Hi, Amy. What is 'engineered hardwood' in this context, please?

My
understanding is that a blade with more teeth will make a finer cut.


Yes, to the point where they clog due to volume of dust produced.

Looking over the blades at Lowes/depot it seems that most of the blades
~60-80 tooth would work fine. However, if more teeth is better than why not
use a plywood blade that has 180 teeth?


It depends on a lot of things, actually.

Sorry if this is a basic question.


It's one of the more complex questions, actually. I'm looking forward
to seeing how it plays out. But, if you can describe this "engineered
hardwood" that'll help a lot.

Dave Hinz
  #3  
Old October 6th 05, 10:30 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
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"Dave Hinz" wrote in message
It's one of the more complex questions, actually. I'm looking forward
to seeing how it plays out. But, if you can describe this "engineered
hardwood" that'll help a lot.

Dave Hinz


Engineered hardwood flooring is made with a plywood base and a "good" layer
of hardwood on top that has a very durable finish. You can see it a
www.mannington.com or the Bruce flooring at Home Depot/Lowes. A plywood
blade will work, but is not really needed. A good carbide blade will do as
well.


  #4  
Old October 6th 05, 10:31 PM
gw
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Need more info:
Handheld circular saw?
I'd use a 36 or 40 tooth 7 1/4"
36 if I was going to make rip and cross-cuts with the same blade.
Get several.

Table saw?
10" 40 tooth combination blade for ripping and cross-cutting

Power Miter saw?
10" - up to 60 teeth for really clean cuts
Probably 80 or 96 teeth on a 12"

More teeth make a finer cut, but take much longer to cut. Ripping the length
of the wood with a high tooth count could be problematic. Too many teeth in
contact with the wood will cause burning, especially in hardwoods. Plywood
blades do not fare well on hardwoods at all. You will want carbide tips.

"Amy L." wrote in message
...
What type of blade do you recommend to cut 9/16" engineered hardwood. My
understanding is that a blade with more teeth will make a finer cut.
Looking over the blades at Lowes/depot it seems that most of the blades
~60-80 tooth would work fine. However, if more teeth is better than why
not use a plywood blade that has 180 teeth?

Sorry if this is a basic question.
Amy



  #5  
Old October 6th 05, 10:52 PM
Doug Payne
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On 06/10/2005 4:04 PM, Amy L. wrote:

What type of blade do you recommend to cut 9/16" engineered hardwood.


If it's hardwood flooring, virtually all the cuts you make will be
hidden by trimwork, won't they? A standard 32T carbide-tip blade would
work just fine for that.
  #6  
Old October 6th 05, 11:20 PM
Dave Hinz
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On Thu, 06 Oct 2005 20:30:57 GMT, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

"Dave Hinz" wrote in message
It's one of the more complex questions, actually. I'm looking forward
to seeing how it plays out. But, if you can describe this "engineered
hardwood" that'll help a lot.


Engineered hardwood flooring is made with a plywood base and a "good" layer
of hardwood on top that has a very durable finish.


Yup, I have a room full of it, but if she said "flooring" I missed that
part.

  #7  
Old October 7th 05, 02:45 PM
George
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"Doug Payne" wrote in message
...
On 06/10/2005 4:04 PM, Amy L. wrote:

What type of blade do you recommend to cut 9/16" engineered hardwood.


If it's hardwood flooring, virtually all the cuts you make will be hidden
by trimwork, won't they? A standard 32T carbide-tip blade would work just
fine for that.


Just in case you measure a bit off, be sure and cut it so the teeth go down
into the good surface, placing chips on the unseen side.


 




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