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Bench grinders



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 6th 05, 03:36 AM
Never Enough Money
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Most slow speed grinders are 1750 RPMs. Garret Wade has one that 1120
RPM., approx $200 when you include two aluminum oxide wheels and a
verital tool rest....

http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?...oductID=101879

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  #12  
Old May 6th 05, 05:07 AM
Unquestionably Confused
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Anyone here have any information on the Boice-Crane "Friction Matic Wet
Tool Grinder?"

It's an ~ 8" x 1" dia whetstone which is turned by a rubber roller that
is, in turn, pulley driven by an electric motor. All this is mounted in
a metal body which will hold water and has a rubber plug to drain it.

Found the thing at a "garage sale" sponsored by the local recycling
organization and paid a whole $3.00 for it. Other than being dusty with
a touch of surface rust it appears to be in excellent condition. Rubber
is solid and the whetstone is in good shape with a flat surface.

Searched like crazy to find out a bit about this and all I could find
was a couple of other kindred spirits who were 1) asking for information
and 2) complaining that the wheel was shot on theirs.

Would like to know if anyone has one and could tell me what size the
drive pulley should be and what they are using for a motor (I presume a
1725 rpm due to the purpose of the machine).

Unlike some others here, I'll accept stupid answers, arrogant remarks,
etc. I'm fully capable of hitting the Delete key so USENET READER,
please feel free to post.

Thanks to EVERYONE else.

  #13  
Old May 6th 05, 12:06 PM
B a r r y
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Lowell Holmes wrote:
I have the Delta 6" variable speed grinder and I like it. !


I had a Delta Shopmaster variable speed 6".

The first example was flat out unusable due to vibrations that no
balancing, wheel replacement, etc... could fix. I returned this for
another. The second was used for about 10 hours, and the variable
speed failed. This unit also vibrated, but much less.

I finally spent 3 times as much on a Baldor. Now I know just what a low
quality tool the Delta was.

I'm glad yours is working out, I'm sure some good ones slip out of
China. G

Barry
  #14  
Old May 6th 05, 02:54 PM
Larry Jaques
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On Thu, 05 May 2005 15:09:27 -0600, the inscrutable John DeBoo
spake:

Larry Jaques wrote:


If you go with a grinder, get a nice, slow-speed Baldor 8-incher with
fine wheels. "ONLY" about $550 + fine wheels. g
http://www.mile-x.com/WoodMetal/Grinders/8100W.htm

Or for less money ($300+), go to www.leevalley.com and get their Mk-II
power sharpener.


Christ, for $29-$39 I can buy a nice 6" and do anything the above


There is nothing nice about a cheap grinder, John. And you'll be hard
pressed to buy a pair of fine _wheels_ for that price.


overpriced grinders can do, and at that price I can afford to ****can
the entire grinder and replace it several times when the wheels wear
out, and STILL not spend anywhere near $500.


Yeah, that's why I put the sub-$100 tool first. I played the Baldor
gasp card as a shocker.

I haven't touched an edge tool to a grinding wheel since I first tried
a 1" belt sander a few decades ago.


--
"Excess regulation and government spending destroy jobs and increase
unemployment. Every regulator we fire results in the creation of over
150 new jobs, enough to hire the ex-regulator, the unemployed, and
the able-bodied poor." -Michael Badnarik

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  #15  
Old May 7th 05, 12:31 AM
C & S
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I was thinking of getting one of these with the planer blade jig. If it
does a decent job it could pay for itself in a couple of years. But does it
work well?

I have only had my planer an jointer blades ground "professionaly" by a
local guy and I was really unimpressed. Living in a small town, the only
alternative is mailing them out which only adds to the cost.



And the Horizontal WetStone grinder is also on sale for $76.49
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=4866



  #16  
Old May 7th 05, 12:58 PM
George
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I'm fortunate enough to have purchased the Makita, and it's a great machine.
Last time the comparative merits were discussed, I mentioned the vast
difference in shipping weights. I seriously doubt this machine is capable
of consistent adjustment based on its lightweight construction.

"C & S" wrote in message
...

I was thinking of getting one of these with the planer blade jig. If it
does a decent job it could pay for itself in a couple of years. But does

it
work well?

I have only had my planer an jointer blades ground "professionaly" by a
local guy and I was really unimpressed. Living in a small town, the only
alternative is mailing them out which only adds to the cost.



And the Horizontal WetStone grinder is also on sale for $76.49
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=4866





  #17  
Old May 8th 05, 03:09 AM
Bruce Barnett
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"George" george@least writes:

And the Horizontal WetStone grinder is also on sale for $76.49
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=4866


Last time the comparative merits were discussed, I mentioned the vast
difference in shipping weights. I seriously doubt this machine is capable
of consistent adjustment based on its lightweight construction.


I just bought one of those woodcraft wetstone sharpeners and used it
for the first time today.

I am having a hard time getting the water to come out at a steady
rate. Also - the lower tank does not fit well. I had to put tape on
it to guide the dripping water into the tank.

It looks like a tube should be used to make sure water falls into the
tank. Yet no tube was found in the package.

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  #18  
Old May 8th 05, 03:24 AM
AAvK
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I just bought one of those woodcraft wetstone sharpeners and used it
for the first time today.

I am having a hard time getting the water to come out at a steady
rate. Also - the lower tank does not fit well. I had to put tape on
it to guide the dripping water into the tank.

It looks like a tube should be used to make sure water falls into the
tank. Yet no tube was found in the package.

--

Probably why they're "on sale" of course, another blunder far from
"quality control" of manufacture. Go to an aqarium store for some
soft tubing. How is the blade holder that comes with it? Can you get
a deep enough angle? what is the deepest angle you can get? some
times up to 35 is needed.

--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
not my site: http://www.e-sword.net/


  #19  
Old May 8th 05, 01:20 PM
George
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"Bruce Barnett" wrote in message
...
I just bought one of those woodcraft wetstone sharpeners and used it
for the first time today.

I am having a hard time getting the water to come out at a steady
rate. Also - the lower tank does not fit well. I had to put tape on
it to guide the dripping water into the tank.


Predictable weakness in the design. When the tank's full, it flows to
excess, diminishing as you go. Except for the coarsest stone, it should be
OK. For the really porous stuff, hang an IV.


It looks like a tube should be used to make sure water falls into the
tank. Yet no tube was found in the package.


Easily obtained, though unexplained why it shouldn't be there.


  #20  
Old May 8th 05, 09:19 PM
Bruce Barnett
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"AAvK" writes:

How is the blade holder that comes with it? Can you get
a deep enough angle? what is the deepest angle you can get? some
times up to 35 is needed.


It looks like about 40 degrees. But I can reverse the tool rest and
make it nearly vertical, but not as close to the stone.
I didn't get the planer jig.....

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