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Threading Jigs?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 25th 05, 09:49 PM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Threading Jigs?

I have decided I need (ok, I want...) a threading jig for making threaded
boxes. I have looked at two alternatives:

The Bonnie Klein Jig - http://www.bonnieklein.com/tjig.htm
The Baxter Threadmaster - http://www.bestwoodtools.com/ (click the
"Baxter's Thread Master" link)

I have two lathes, a Jet mini (my original lathe, which I seldom use now)
and a Stubby s750. One thought is to buy a threading jig to fit the Jet
Mini, and just leave it setup and always ready to do threading. I could
turn on the Stubby, then walk over to the Jet for threading. Not sure how
much "setup time" this saves.

On the other hand, the Baxter model that fits the Stubby can handle 5"
diameter, whereas either the Baxter or Klein for the Jet will only handle 3"
diameter. Might be nice to have the additional size.

Baxter has a model that directly fits the Stubby, whereas I would have to
make my own riser block for the Klien to fit that lathe. Both Baxter and
Klein have models that directly fit the Jet.

Any opinions on these two jigs? What other aspects / features should I be
comparing? And how much convenience is added by having the jig setup on a
second lathe?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Scott



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  #2  
Old February 25th 05, 10:04 PM
william_b_noble
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

a simple jig seems easy enough to make - I keep meaning to do it and get
distracted - the premise being that making it is "fun" and buying it is "not
fun" - with that caveat,
get threaded rod, either 1.25 or 1 X8 so you can attach your chuck to it -
get a couple of nuts to make a "head stock"
now as you turn the rod, it will move laterally in the nuts, making the
proper motion for cutting threads.

Now, get a 60 deg edge cutter and a cheap HF die cutting drill - mount in a
dovetail type slide so you can align it at the proper diameter, fire up the
drill and rotate the threaded rod to cut threads into the object being
threaded.



"Scott" wrote in message
...
I have decided I need (ok, I want...) a threading jig for making threaded
boxes. I have looked at two alternatives:

The Bonnie Klein Jig - http://www.bonnieklein.com/tjig.htm
The Baxter Threadmaster - http://www.bestwoodtools.com/ (click the
"Baxter's Thread Master" link)

I have two lathes, a Jet mini (my original lathe, which I seldom use now)
and a Stubby s750. One thought is to buy a threading jig to fit the Jet
Mini, and just leave it setup and always ready to do threading. I could
turn on the Stubby, then walk over to the Jet for threading. Not sure how
much "setup time" this saves.

On the other hand, the Baxter model that fits the Stubby can handle 5"
diameter, whereas either the Baxter or Klein for the Jet will only handle

3"
diameter. Might be nice to have the additional size.

Baxter has a model that directly fits the Stubby, whereas I would have to
make my own riser block for the Klien to fit that lathe. Both Baxter and
Klein have models that directly fit the Jet.

Any opinions on these two jigs? What other aspects / features should I be
comparing? And how much convenience is added by having the jig setup on a
second lathe?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Scott





  #3  
Old February 25th 05, 10:13 PM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bill,

If "buying is not fun", then you're not doing it right. :-)

Seriously, I'm just not very good at rigging stuff like that up. I
eventually get there, but it usually involves a lot of time and several
screwups along the way. Sometimes that journey can be entertaining (if not
to me, certainly to those watching), but in this case I'd just like to buy
one and start cuttin' threads.

I've heard a lot of good things about the Klein jig, not much about the
Baxter but I don't think it has been around very long. I'm leaning towards
the Baxter, due to the larger capacity (5"), and direct fit on the Stubby
without making a riser block.

Scott

"william_b_noble" wrote in message
news:1109368601.0e81fdb25aef6b0add6e6aa5b07928c9@t eranews...
a simple jig seems easy enough to make - I keep meaning to do it and get
distracted - the premise being that making it is "fun" and buying it is

"not
fun" - with that caveat,
get threaded rod, either 1.25 or 1 X8 so you can attach your chuck to

it -
get a couple of nuts to make a "head stock"
now as you turn the rod, it will move laterally in the nuts, making the
proper motion for cutting threads.

Now, get a 60 deg edge cutter and a cheap HF die cutting drill - mount in

a
dovetail type slide so you can align it at the proper diameter, fire up

the
drill and rotate the threaded rod to cut threads into the object being
threaded.



"Scott" wrote in message
...
I have decided I need (ok, I want...) a threading jig for making

threaded
boxes. I have looked at two alternatives:

The Bonnie Klein Jig - http://www.bonnieklein.com/tjig.htm
The Baxter Threadmaster - http://www.bestwoodtools.com/ (click the
"Baxter's Thread Master" link)

I have two lathes, a Jet mini (my original lathe, which I seldom use

now)
and a Stubby s750. One thought is to buy a threading jig to fit the Jet
Mini, and just leave it setup and always ready to do threading. I could
turn on the Stubby, then walk over to the Jet for threading. Not sure

how
much "setup time" this saves.

On the other hand, the Baxter model that fits the Stubby can handle 5"
diameter, whereas either the Baxter or Klein for the Jet will only

handle
3"
diameter. Might be nice to have the additional size.

Baxter has a model that directly fits the Stubby, whereas I would have

to
make my own riser block for the Klien to fit that lathe. Both Baxter

and
Klein have models that directly fit the Jet.

Any opinions on these two jigs? What other aspects / features should I

be
comparing? And how much convenience is added by having the jig setup on

a
second lathe?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Scott







  #4  
Old February 26th 05, 04:12 AM
Fred Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hello Scott,

Craft Supplies Ltd. in the UK sell a very simple threading jig that will fit any
lathe that you can get a tool post for. It was one that I tried out when writing
my book, Making Screw Threads in Wood. In our shop, we have a Klein Jig on a
Klein lathe, the threading jig sold in the UK, and the Noval Ornamental turner
which will cut threads. I also have a drawer full of chasers and much prefer
them to any of the threading jigs. I ran a test with a fellow several years ago
to see which of us could make a threaded box the fastest. He had a Klein jig on
a Carbatec lathe, and I had a thread chaser on a Carbatec lathe. I won the race.

I have thread chasers in 24 tpi, 20 tpi, 18 tpi, 16 tpi, 14 tpi, 12 tpi, 10 tpi,
8 tpi, and 3-1/2 tpi. You can't get that much variation with any threading jig.
The learning curve is a bit slower and you can't thread quite as soft of wood
with a chaser as you can with a rotating cutter.

These are just some additional thoughts for you to consider.

Fred Holder
http://www.fholder.com

In article , Scott says...

I have decided I need (ok, I want...) a threading jig for making threaded
boxes. I have looked at two alternatives:

The Bonnie Klein Jig - http://www.bonnieklein.com/tjig.htm
The Baxter Threadmaster - http://www.bestwoodtools.com/ (click the
"Baxter's Thread Master" link)

I have two lathes, a Jet mini (my original lathe, which I seldom use now)
and a Stubby s750. One thought is to buy a threading jig to fit the Jet
Mini, and just leave it setup and always ready to do threading. I could
turn on the Stubby, then walk over to the Jet for threading. Not sure how
much "setup time" this saves.

On the other hand, the Baxter model that fits the Stubby can handle 5"
diameter, whereas either the Baxter or Klein for the Jet will only handle 3"
diameter. Might be nice to have the additional size.

Baxter has a model that directly fits the Stubby, whereas I would have to
make my own riser block for the Klien to fit that lathe. Both Baxter and
Klein have models that directly fit the Jet.

Any opinions on these two jigs? What other aspects / features should I be
comparing? And how much convenience is added by having the jig setup on a
second lathe?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Scott




  #5  
Old February 26th 05, 05:59 AM
tb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

500.00 for a jig!!! buy some thread chasers and practice, you will be
amazed at all the other cool stuff you can buy with your remaining
400.00 something dollars!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  #6  
Old February 27th 05, 03:37 PM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Fred -

Thanks for the info. I hadn't seen the one from CSLtd, so I'll take a look
at that.

I have thread chasers in 24 tpi, 20 tpi, 18 tpi, 16 tpi, 14 tpi, 12

tpi, 10 tpi,
8 tpi, and 3-1/2 tpi. You can't get that much variation with any

threading jig.

Actually, the Baxter has optional heads for 24, 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, and
8. It comes with one head, and the others are available for (ouch) $110
each -- about twice what each set of chasers would cost?

I make most my boxes from harder woods, like walnut, koa, purpleheart. What
would be the best thread pitch to start out with? Is 16 too fine? Would 14
be better?

I'm just not sure I could get the hang of hand chasing. For someone with
the turning expertise you have, I'm sure hand chasing is easy and fast
compared to the setup time of the jig. Since I'm just slightly beyond the
beginner stage of turning, wouldn't I be better off with the jig?

....Scott


"Fred Holder" wrote in message
...
Hello Scott,

Craft Supplies Ltd. in the UK sell a very simple threading jig that will

fit any
lathe that you can get a tool post for. It was one that I tried out when

writing
my book, Making Screw Threads in Wood. In our shop, we have a Klein Jig on

a
Klein lathe, the threading jig sold in the UK, and the Noval Ornamental

turner
which will cut threads. I also have a drawer full of chasers and much

prefer
them to any of the threading jigs. I ran a test with a fellow several

years ago
to see which of us could make a threaded box the fastest. He had a Klein

jig on
a Carbatec lathe, and I had a thread chaser on a Carbatec lathe. I won the

race.

I have thread chasers in 24 tpi, 20 tpi, 18 tpi, 16 tpi, 14 tpi, 12 tpi,

10 tpi,
8 tpi, and 3-1/2 tpi. You can't get that much variation with any threading

jig.
The learning curve is a bit slower and you can't thread quite as soft of

wood
with a chaser as you can with a rotating cutter.

These are just some additional thoughts for you to consider.

Fred Holder
http://www.fholder.com



  #7  
Old February 27th 05, 07:01 PM
Arch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Scott, I suppose there are many reasons for wanting to make threaded
box lids; the fun of making a jig, the satisfaction of learning a skill,
the novelty of a different kind of lid and whatever compels you
personally to want to buy a threading device. All valid reasons of
course, but none of which has much to do with a box owner's needs or
even desires. Why unscrew a box lid to select or put away cuff links and
earrings? Except when the box is open the threads are hidden and don't
ornament.

Some threads in wood are traditional; nut crackers, curds & whey
presses, kitchen canisters and other treen. Threads are needed for some
special boxes such as religious containers and urns, but IMHO, most of
the appeal of threaded lids for small boxes lies in the making thereof.
Not that there's anything wrong with that.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings

  #8  
Old February 27th 05, 10:26 PM
Fred Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hello Scott,

As far as getting started immediately, a threading jig would get you going much
quicker than hand chasing and would also work with the softer woods like walnut.
The Craft Supplies Ltd. device takes a little more fiddeling than the other
jigs, but it is considerably less expensive and it does do a good job.

In the long run, the skill of thread chasing is a very useful one to have in
your kit. Some time back, I needed to make some 12 tpi external threads, but
didn't have a chaser. I had an old adapter that I had purchased from Grizzley by
accident. I cut a slice out of the threaded area with an abrasive cut off saw
and held it with a pair of vice grips. I chased the threads quite easily.
Without that skill, if would have been difficult to get these threads.

For a box, the normal is 16 tpi, but 14 tpi would likely work well and would
work better in the softer hard woods. A little thin super glue flooded over the
wood often it easier to thread and makes the threads hold together better.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

Fred Holder
http://www.fholder.com/

In article , Scott says...

Fred -

Thanks for the info. I hadn't seen the one from CSLtd, so I'll take a look
at that.

I have thread chasers in 24 tpi, 20 tpi, 18 tpi, 16 tpi, 14 tpi, 12

tpi, 10 tpi,
8 tpi, and 3-1/2 tpi. You can't get that much variation with any

threading jig.

Actually, the Baxter has optional heads for 24, 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, and
8. It comes with one head, and the others are available for (ouch) $110
each -- about twice what each set of chasers would cost?

I make most my boxes from harder woods, like walnut, koa, purpleheart. What
would be the best thread pitch to start out with? Is 16 too fine? Would 14
be better?

I'm just not sure I could get the hang of hand chasing. For someone with
the turning expertise you have, I'm sure hand chasing is easy and fast
compared to the setup time of the jig. Since I'm just slightly beyond the
beginner stage of turning, wouldn't I be better off with the jig?

...Scott


"Fred Holder" wrote in message
...
Hello Scott,

Craft Supplies Ltd. in the UK sell a very simple threading jig that will

fit any
lathe that you can get a tool post for. It was one that I tried out when

writing
my book, Making Screw Threads in Wood. In our shop, we have a Klein Jig on

a
Klein lathe, the threading jig sold in the UK, and the Noval Ornamental

turner
which will cut threads. I also have a drawer full of chasers and much

prefer
them to any of the threading jigs. I ran a test with a fellow several

years ago
to see which of us could make a threaded box the fastest. He had a Klein

jig on
a Carbatec lathe, and I had a thread chaser on a Carbatec lathe. I won the

race.

I have thread chasers in 24 tpi, 20 tpi, 18 tpi, 16 tpi, 14 tpi, 12 tpi,

10 tpi,
8 tpi, and 3-1/2 tpi. You can't get that much variation with any threading

jig.
The learning curve is a bit slower and you can't thread quite as soft of

wood
with a chaser as you can with a rotating cutter.

These are just some additional thoughts for you to consider.

Fred Holder
http://www.fholder.com




  #9  
Old February 28th 05, 03:27 AM
Ken Moon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"william_b_noble" wrote in message
news:1109368601.0e81fdb25aef6b0add6e6aa5b07928c9@t eranews...
a simple jig seems easy enough to make - I keep meaning to do it and get
distracted - the premise being that making it is "fun" and buying it is
"not
fun" - with that caveat,
get threaded rod, either 1.25 or 1 X8 so you can attach your chuck to
it -
get a couple of nuts to make a "head stock"
now as you turn the rod, it will move laterally in the nuts, making the
proper motion for cutting threads.

Now, get a 60 deg edge cutter and a cheap HF die cutting drill - mount in
a
dovetail type slide so you can align it at the proper diameter, fire up
the
drill and rotate the threaded rod to cut threads into the object being
threaded.

===========================

Here's you another opportunity for an additional sideline (to go along with
your face plates and vacuum pumps). There should be a market if the price is
rock bottom like the other items.

Ken Moon
Webberville, TX


  #10  
Old February 28th 05, 05:04 AM
J. Clarke
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Arch wrote:

Hi Scott, I suppose there are many reasons for wanting to make threaded
box lids; the fun of making a jig, the satisfaction of learning a skill,
the novelty of a different kind of lid and whatever compels you
personally to want to buy a threading device. All valid reasons of
course, but none of which has much to do with a box owner's needs or
even desires. Why unscrew a box lid to select or put away cuff links and
earrings?


So that the lid doesn't fly off and scatter the contents to the four winds
when you drop the box?

Except when the box is open the threads are hidden and don't
ornament.


Unless the whole box is threaded.

Some threads in wood are traditional; nut crackers, curds & whey
presses, kitchen canisters and other treen. Threads are needed for some
special boxes such as religious containers and urns, but IMHO, most of
the appeal of threaded lids for small boxes lies in the making thereof.
Not that there's anything wrong with that.


Turn to Safety, Arch
Fortiter



http://community.webtv.net/almcc/MacsMusings


--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
 




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