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Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

1944 oliver



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 13th 17, 07:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default 1944 oliver

looks well used but same owner for last 29 years


https://olympic.craigslist.org/hvo/6013232421.html


plus everything else goes with it including the wood

a steal at 2500 for someone that has the room and equipment to move it








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  #2  
Old March 14th 17, 02:08 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default 1944 oliver


https://olympic.craigslist.org/hvo/6013232421.html


I don't know. I know everyone talks about how great things were 50-60-70 years ago. And maybe simple things were built better back then with more labor quality and raw material quality. But anything with any sophistication to it, I'll take modern over old. 1960s-1970s car or 2010 car? I think a lathe fits into the sophisticated category. An electric motor makes it sophisticated. The one on this lathe says 2hp, 7.7 amps, and 400/2000 rpm. Not sure how the rpm works with two speeds. A motor would not specify two pulleys. 12 or 16 inch swing? I think you would be better off with a comparable priced new Jet lathe. Or finding a Rikon/Woodfast which is basically identical to this except variable speed. Or save a few more dollars and get the Powermatic 3520. Its only an extra $1500 right now.
  #3  
Old March 16th 17, 11:38 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default 1944 oliver

On Mon, 13 Mar 2017 19:08:44 -0700 (PDT)
" wrote:

1960s-1970s car or 2010 car? I think a lathe fits into the
sophisticated category. An electric motor makes it sophisticated.
The one on this lathe says 2hp, 7.7 amps, and 400/2000 rpm. Not sure
how the rpm works with two speeds. A motor would not specify two


not sure how the speed is controlled
the controller does not reveal how it works to me

pulleys. 12 or 16 inch swing? I think you would be better off with


try the outboard setup and turn 6 foot bowls like the ad says

a comparable priced new Jet lathe. Or finding a Rikon/Woodfast which
is basically identical to this except variable speed. Or save a few


they are not identical since the oliver is built like a tank
this kind of lathe is not for someone that would buy a jet lathe

this guy has several oliver lathes
http://rogturning.com/gallery

http://rogturning.com/yahoo_site_adm...1658_large.JPG


these oliver lathes are in a class alone

maybe robust and oneway comes close but you know what they say about
close







  #4  
Old March 17th 17, 02:30 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 1,893
Default 1944 oliver

On a lathe this old and being a speed controller - it is :

1. mechanical I say no.
2. Thyratrons running two for control of AC rectification and power
control. It might be powered by them and driven by a pulse width
signal that drives more or less current. Pulse-width-modulation...

(the beginning of the SCR controllers SS Thyratrons and frequency
controlled motors.)

I'd expect the latter since it is a DC motor with a speed control.

I'd not worry much as long as it can be demonstrated running....

I have some 1000 amp Thyratrons - and made a Flip-Flop that pulsed the
units on/off automatically and it was a light show and fun.


Martin

On 3/16/2017 6:38 PM, Electric Comet wrote:
On Mon, 13 Mar 2017 19:08:44 -0700 (PDT)
" wrote:

1960s-1970s car or 2010 car? I think a lathe fits into the
sophisticated category. An electric motor makes it sophisticated.
The one on this lathe says 2hp, 7.7 amps, and 400/2000 rpm. Not sure
how the rpm works with two speeds. A motor would not specify two


not sure how the speed is controlled
the controller does not reveal how it works to me

pulleys. 12 or 16 inch swing? I think you would be better off with


try the outboard setup and turn 6 foot bowls like the ad says

a comparable priced new Jet lathe. Or finding a Rikon/Woodfast which
is basically identical to this except variable speed. Or save a few


they are not identical since the oliver is built like a tank
this kind of lathe is not for someone that would buy a jet lathe

this guy has several oliver lathes
http://rogturning.com/gallery

http://rogturning.com/yahoo_site_adm...1658_large.JPG


these oliver lathes are in a class alone

maybe robust and oneway comes close but you know what they say about
close







  #5  
Old March 18th 17, 11:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 1,675
Default 1944 oliver

On Thu, 16 Mar 2017 21:30:15 -0500
Martin Eastburn wrote:

I'd expect the latter since it is a DC motor with a speed control.



why not just slip pulleys a.k.a. reeves drive


thyratron sounds pretty exotic for a wood lathe







  #6  
Old March 20th 17, 01:52 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 1,893
Default 1944 oliver

The large motor likely has to much for slip.

If you mean a CONE pulley on both sides - likely.
Then why not an AC drive.

If slip - why not a AC drive.

No need for DC motor if not electronic speed control.
Those were in use at that time.

AC motors are lower cost than DC.

Martin

On 3/18/2017 6:36 PM, Electric Comet wrote:
On Thu, 16 Mar 2017 21:30:15 -0500
Martin Eastburn wrote:

I'd expect the latter since it is a DC motor with a speed control.



why not just slip pulleys a.k.a. reeves drive


thyratron sounds pretty exotic for a wood lathe







  #7  
Old March 20th 17, 06:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 1,675
Default 1944 oliver

On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 20:52:33 -0500
Martin Eastburn wrote:

The large motor likely has to much for slip.

If you mean a CONE pulley on both sides - likely.
Then why not an AC drive.

If slip - why not a AC drive.

No need for DC motor if not electronic speed control.
Those were in use at that time.

AC motors are lower cost than DC.


good points and questions
oliver may have drawings still of the mechanism

the motor maker is still doing business and looks to be high quality
stuff

blurb says motors up to 20,000hp
http://louisallis.com/

also the lathe was made in late 1940 according to the serial number







 




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