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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Kitchen.. distance from cooker to sink?



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 19th 04, 06:37 PM
tony sayer
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Default Kitchen.. distance from cooker to sink?


Someone told moi in a kitchen suppliers depot the other week that there
is a distance that you must *exceed* between the Sink and a Cooker hob
i.e. so that you can't touch them with both hands, one hand on the hob
the other on the sink as it were.

Is this actually the case, as surely both should be earth bonded?.

BTW whilst on the subject is there an industry standard from the floor
to the top of the work top or not?.

Cheers..
--
Tony Sayer

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  #3  
Old October 19th 04, 11:44 PM
Richard
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Default



tony sayer wrote:

BTW whilst on the subject is there an industry standard from the floor
to the top of the work top or not?.


Yes there is and, if my experience is anything to go by, it is set so
that Osteopaths/Chiropractors and the like are kept in regular
employment, i.e. too low! My existing kitchen surfaces are an
excrutiating 900 mm high, the replacement will be 950 mm high. If you
are installing, or having installed, a kitchen get it put in at a height
that suits you, not the installer/supplier!

I judge the best height by standing at a working distance from the edge
of the surface and, without leaning forward, seeing how far towards the
rear edge I can place my hand flat on the surface. If I reach about 70%
towards the back I reckon that's a good compromise in terms of height at
the front edge and height at the rear. Over the years I have come to
the conclusion that stuff clutters work surfaces if you can't easily
reach all or most of the surface without straining your back. Another
consideration is that of sink height; don't forget that the part of the
sink which will have most impact on your back is the base, not the top lip.

Getting off hobby horse now. Sorry but appropriate height of work
surfaces gets me really worked up.

Richard


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Real email address is RJS at BIGFOOT dot COM

The information contained in this post
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  #4  
Old October 20th 04, 10:08 AM
Christian McArdle
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Is this actually the case, as surely both should be earth bonded?.

Incorrect. There is no requirement to supplementary bond anything in the
kitchen. The hob surface may be bonded through the electric supply, if it is
a metal gas type with mains ignition, although it might be double insulated
instead.

Christian.


  #5  
Old October 20th 04, 05:14 PM
Ian Stirling
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Default

Richard wrote:


tony sayer wrote:

BTW whilst on the subject is there an industry standard from the floor
to the top of the work top or not?.


Yes there is and, if my experience is anything to go by, it is set so
that Osteopaths/Chiropractors and the like are kept in regular
employment, i.e. too low! My existing kitchen surfaces are an
excrutiating 900 mm high, the replacement will be 950 mm high. If you
are installing, or having installed, a kitchen get it put in at a height
that suits you, not the installer/supplier!

snip
Getting off hobby horse now. Sorry but appropriate height of work
surfaces gets me really worked up.


It's your own damn fault.
Most sane people do not use worktops when mounted
  #6  
Old October 20th 04, 09:02 PM
Rob Graham
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Default

Richard wrote in message ...
tony sayer wrote:

BTW whilst on the subject is there an industry standard from the floor
to the top of the work top or not?.


Yes there is and, if my experience is anything to go by, it is set so
that Osteopaths/Chiropractors and the like are kept in regular
employment, i.e. too low! My existing kitchen surfaces are an
excrutiating 900 mm high, the replacement will be 950 mm high. If you
are installing, or having installed, a kitchen get it put in at a height
that suits you, not the installer/supplier!

I judge the best height by standing at a working distance from the edge
of the surface and, without leaning forward, seeing how far towards the
rear edge I can place my hand flat on the surface. If I reach about 70%
towards the back I reckon that's a good compromise in terms of height at
the front edge and height at the rear. Over the years I have come to
the conclusion that stuff clutters work surfaces if you can't easily
reach all or most of the surface without straining your back. Another
consideration is that of sink height; don't forget that the part of the
sink which will have most impact on your back is the base, not the top lip.

Getting off hobby horse now. Sorry but appropriate height of work
surfaces gets me really worked up.

Richard


Can't agree with you more; ours was set so that we were not bending
our backs when doing the washing up. For a 5' 9" male that gave a
worktop height of 96cm (sorry for mixing the units - I don't know my
metric height) and it has been excellent.

One thing I would suggest, if the option, is available is a lower
surface - in our case 10cm lower for making things like pastry. If you
are really wanting to impress your lady partner you insert a marble
surface into that for keeping the pastry cool when working it.

Rob
  #7  
Old October 20th 04, 09:49 PM
Richard
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Default



Rob Graham wrote:

Can't agree with you more; ours was set so that we were not bending
our backs when doing the washing up. For a 5' 9" male that gave a
worktop height of 96cm (sorry for mixing the units - I don't know my
metric height) and it has been excellent.



Lucky devil - 960 mm or even higher would be better for me at 6'2'' but
SWMBO is not as tall, another compromise (in every sense!)

One thing I would suggest, if the option, is available is a lower
surface - in our case 10cm lower for making things like pastry. If you
are really wanting to impress your lady partner you insert a marble
surface into that for keeping the pastry cool when working it.

Rob


No need for marble pastry surfaces. Liz's extremities are like ice all
year round (Raynaud's Syndrome + Arthristis)

But, I would have liked a low hob - perhaps 900 - but that would have
added far too much to the kitchen complexity.

Cheers Richard

--
Real email address is RJS at BIGFOOT dot COM

The information contained in this post
may not be published in, or used by

http://www.diyprojects.info
  #8  
Old October 21st 04, 09:33 AM
Christian McArdle
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and the sink will be earthed to the water and mains earth which is very
close by...

Personally, if I was installing a metal kitchen sink, I would ensure that I
used plastic plumbing, at least for the last metre or so. Isolation is safer
than bonding, if achievable.

Christian.


  #9  
Old October 21st 04, 10:27 AM
tony sayer
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Default

In article , Christian
McArdle writes
and the sink will be earthed to the water and mains earth which is very

close by...

Personally, if I was installing a metal kitchen sink, I would ensure that I
used plastic plumbing, at least for the last metre or so. Isolation is safer
than bonding, if achievable.

Christian.



Why do you reckon that then Christian?...
--
Tony Sayer

  #10  
Old October 21st 04, 10:39 AM
Christian McArdle
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Default

Why do you reckon that then Christian?...

Because you won't get a shock from an isolated piece of metal, even with you
other hand clamped firmly on a live conductor. If the metal is earthed, you
have a low impedence path to earth. The RCD might save you if the live
conductor happens to be connected via an RCD. If not, you're toast. The 32A
MCB will require 160A to guarantee disconnection, which is not going to
happen!

The IEE agree. Even in bathrooms they advise not to bond metal baths or
radiators if all supplies and wastes are plastic and the item is not in
contact with structural metalwork. Indeed, they strongly recommend
connecting using plastic pipework so that you can take advantage of the
additional safety thereby provided.

Christian.


 




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