A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » UK diy
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Wood burning stoves -- steel or cast iron



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 15th 04, 03:02 PM
Simon Langford
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wood burning stoves -- steel or cast iron

I was looking at an Aga to heat our large high-ceilinged kitchen, but
for various reasons we've eliminated that option and are now looking
at wood burners.

The one we like is the Morso O8 (see
http://www.morsostoves.co.uk/Valor/V...B?OpenDocument).
This is a steel stove, but we like the design better than all the
cast iron stoves we've looked at.

So what difference does steel vs. cast iron actually make? My guess
is that an iron stove would stay hot longer after the fire has
subsided. Would it also take longer to get hot once the fire is lit?
Presumably so, since you can't get something for nothing.

This particular make (Morso) seem quite expensive. Other steel stoves
seem to go for around 600 where this is more like 1000. Does anyone
have a steel Morso stove and are they worth the extra outlay?

Thanks,

Simon.
Ads
  #2  
Old September 15th 04, 03:16 PM
Michael Mcneil
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Simon Langford" wrote in message
om

I was looking at an Aga to heat our large high-ceilinged kitchen, but
for various reasons we've eliminated that option and are now looking
at wood burners.


The one we like is the Morso O8 (see
http://www.morsostoves.co.uk/Valor/V...B?OpenDocument).
This is a steel stove, but we like the design better than all the
cast iron stoves we've looked at.


Other steel stoves seem to go for around 600 where this is more like
1000. Does anyone have a steel Morso stove and are they worth the extra outlay?


No idea about prices but it looks like you will be filling it every hour
at peak burn rate. Does it have an hopper?

600 quid seems a lot for a fireplace. You could make your own with some
large tins. It would be a pain emptying it though. And have you thought
through what is going to happen to your carpet when you empty the ashes?

Have a trawl through this site to see what fireworks come up seasonally
here.


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #3  
Old September 15th 04, 03:20 PM
Grunff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Simon Langford wrote:
I was looking at an Aga to heat our large high-ceilinged kitchen, but
for various reasons we've eliminated that option and are now looking
at wood burners.

The one we like is the Morso O8 (see
http://www.morsostoves.co.uk/Valor/V...B?OpenDocument).
This is a steel stove, but we like the design better than all the
cast iron stoves we've looked at.

So what difference does steel vs. cast iron actually make? My guess
is that an iron stove would stay hot longer after the fire has
subsided. Would it also take longer to get hot once the fire is lit?
Presumably so, since you can't get something for nothing.

This particular make (Morso) seem quite expensive. Other steel stoves
seem to go for around 600 where this is more like 1000. Does anyone
have a steel Morso stove and are they worth the extra outlay?



Can't answer your question, but we've just installed a Morso Squirrel,
and I have to say I'm *extremely* happy with it. The build quality is
superb. The output is huge for such a small stove.

--
Grunff
  #4  
Old September 15th 04, 05:22 PM
Tony Williams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Simon Langford wrote:

So what difference does steel vs. cast iron actually make?


I read a (US) book on woodburners a few years ago.

They were of the opinion that cast iron was best,
because what they called 'boiler plate' stoves
had a tendency to distort if overheated.

Our is cast iron, a Spencer Sherwood. A big ugly
brute, but it will take huge logs and well sealed,
so that an overnight tickover is no problem.

These are the things I would look at first as well.
Is it a big firebox that will take nice long logs.
Are all doors well-fitting, with sealing gaskets.
Is the ash pan large enough to go days without emptying.
Is it practical to do at least some makeshift cooking
on the top if there is a total power cut (that lasts a
few days).

--
Tony Williams.
  #6  
Old September 15th 04, 09:47 PM
Glen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Check out www.dowlingstoves.com . The designs obviously aren't for everyone,
but they are very popular in our region, and the build quality is fantastic.
I mention it here mainly due to the fact that they too are fabricated from
mild steel, and that the site is very informative as to reasons for this
etc.

Glen


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
### micro-FAQ on wood # 020 P van Rijckevorsel Woodworking 0 September 24th 04 08:44 AM
### micro-FAQ on wood # 019 P van Rijckevorsel Woodworking 0 September 10th 04 06:33 PM
### micro-FAQ on wood # 012 P van Rijckevorsel Woodworking 1 June 15th 04 02:04 PM
### micro-FAQ on wood # 008 P van Rijckevorsel Woodworking 0 April 27th 04 05:07 PM
Knife Steel FAQ updated Gunner Metalworking 9 June 27th 03 12:11 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.