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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 7th 13, 01:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 221
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.
Ads
  #2  
Old December 7th 13, 09:46 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,246
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint


"Cursitor Doom" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.


Areldite?
Not sure what temperature it can stand.


  #3  
Old December 7th 13, 10:22 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,777
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

He did say non toxic, and i was always told that epoxy was toxic.

I assume the manufacturer has no spare bits?

One hopes the old paint was non toxic as you have obviously been eating it.

Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"harryagain" wrote in message
...

"Cursitor Doom" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.


Areldite?
Not sure what temperature it can stand.



  #4  
Old December 7th 13, 10:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,927
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

On 07/12/2013 00:27, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?


You can't. Best bet is polish it as best you can. A bit of cast iron or
more likely cast aluminium won't do you any harm and most times will
still come out of the bread. Blunts the knife a bit if it doesn't.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #5  
Old December 7th 13, 12:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,393
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

In article ,
Cursitor Doom writes:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?


2 options...
1. Buy a spare part (easily available for Panasonic bread makers).
2. Take the paddle out after the knock-down stage, which is what I do
when I remember at the appropriate time. On my Panasonic bread
maker, that's about 1 hour before the end of the program, and
well before the bake starts.

At 16 years old, mine is not as non-stick as it was at new, but it
still comes out OK even if I leave it in the bread until the end
of the bake.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #6  
Old December 7th 13, 02:18 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,777
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

If its non stick, one used to be able to buy a 2 part curable ptfe coating.
However, it did need to be baked on and also a degreased item able to stand
high temperatures was required.
I seem to remember this baking was much higher than the cooking for obvious
reasons, and the undercoat or first part had some kind of etching action to
bind to the material. PTFe is by nature extrememly slippery, so to get it to
bond is quite a clever process I understand.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"Andrew Gabriel" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Cursitor Doom writes:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?


2 options...
1. Buy a spare part (easily available for Panasonic bread makers).
2. Take the paddle out after the knock-down stage, which is what I do
when I remember at the appropriate time. On my Panasonic bread
maker, that's about 1 hour before the end of the program, and
well before the bake starts.

At 16 years old, mine is not as non-stick as it was at new, but it
still comes out OK even if I leave it in the bread until the end
of the bake.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]



  #7  
Old December 7th 13, 03:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,238
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

On 07/12/2013 00:27, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.

If you don't want to buy a new one, the *key* question is what material
the paddle is made from. That determines whether "polish" is an option.
Different PTFE sprays may be suited to different substrates.

If it's not magnetic then it is probably an aluminium alloy. If it is,
it is steel (but it could be tin or perhaps zinc plated).
  #8  
Old December 7th 13, 06:28 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,389
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

On 07/12/2013 14:11, newshound wrote:
On 07/12/2013 00:27, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.

If you don't want to buy a new one, the *key* question is what material
the paddle is made from. That determines whether "polish" is an option.
Different PTFE sprays may be suited to different substrates.

If it's not magnetic then it is probably an aluminium alloy. If it is,
it is steel (but it could be tin or perhaps zinc plated).


I can't think of any ovenware which has zinc components/sufaces - at
least not in direct contact with food.

--
Rod
  #9  
Old December 8th 13, 06:05 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,238
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

On 07/12/2013 17:28, polygonum wrote:
On 07/12/2013 14:11, newshound wrote:
On 07/12/2013 00:27, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.

If you don't want to buy a new one, the *key* question is what material
the paddle is made from. That determines whether "polish" is an option.
Different PTFE sprays may be suited to different substrates.

If it's not magnetic then it is probably an aluminium alloy. If it is,
it is steel (but it could be tin or perhaps zinc plated).


I can't think of any ovenware which has zinc components/sufaces - at
least not in direct contact with food.

Nor can I (although you used to get zinc bar-tops and I think kitchen
work surfaces in France). If you were designing a steel paddle to be
coated with some sort of PTFE you might *possibly* want to make it
corrosion resistant in case of pinholes / chips / cracks. But I agree,
zinc is not an ideal candidate because of its slight toxicity and
solubility in acidic solutions.
  #10  
Old December 8th 13, 06:18 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,238
Default non-toxic high-temperature non-stick paint

On 07/12/2013 00:27, Cursitor Doom wrote:
Hi all,

Where can I procure some small amount of the above substance for a bread
maker whose 'stirer paddle' (made from cast iron by the look of it) is
losing its coating?

cheers,

cd.

These two are "food rated"

http://www.gardenxl.com/weber-bbq-no...FfHMtAodKUMA8g

http://www.bearingshopuk.co.uk/amber...FY_MtAodOVYAZA
 




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