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ss July 19th 13 05:44 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the best
way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will kill it
off and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots belong to
trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and the roots
have over the years forced their way through onto my land so I cant
attack by spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas

harryagain July 19th 13 06:22 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 

"ss" wrote in message
...
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the best
way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will kill it off
and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots belong to
trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and the roots have
over the years forced their way through onto my land so I cant attack by
spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas



Chop them off, dig them out. You need a few inches of
scalpings/chippings/coarse sand under your new slabs anyway.
You can put some weedproof fabric down the hole before you put in the
scalpings. Not that is works so good anyway.

If you kill your neighbour's trees with weedkiller you won't be popular.



Brian Gaff July 19th 13 06:38 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
If you kill the plants you could be in trouble with your neighbour. I guess
if they are well established you could cut them off at the boundary, but
trying to stop them growing back is going to mean killing the plants.
Brian

--
From the Bed of Brian Gaff.
The email is valid as
Blind user.
"ss" wrote in message
...
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the best
way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will kill it off
and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots belong to
trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and the roots have
over the years forced their way through onto my land so I cant attack by
spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas




ss July 19th 13 07:11 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
On 19/07/2013 18:38, Brian Gaff wrote:
If you kill the plants you could be in trouble with your neighbour. I guess
if they are well established you could cut them off at the boundary, but
trying to stop them growing back is going to mean killing the plants.
Brian


It would be classed as common land on the side the tress/shrubs are
growing, its not an adjoining property. If there is some `die back` it
wouldnt be an issue as the maintenance/management company find it a pain
having to come and trim them and are quite happy if we control them
although a complete kill off would cause some concern. The main root
system will be over the wall so what I have, if killed would maybe stunt
them but I doubt if it would kill them.

Phil L July 19th 13 07:38 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
ss wrote:
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the
best way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will
kill it off and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots
belong to trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and
the roots have over the years forced their way through onto my land
so I cant attack by spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my
property.


I've come across this many times...firstly, weedkiller doesn't work on
roots, it has to go in via the leaves, and it doesn't do anything to tree
roots anyway, at least not for many years after the tree is dead.

Best bet is to dig a trench along the wall where the offending plants /
trees are and chop everything off to a depth of a foot or two, then infill
with MOT, also throw a bag of cement in there and mix it up with a spade as
you're spreading it, this will effectively make the wall foundations a bit
more beefed up and hopefully keep the roots away for a decade or two.

Rake over the area you are working on and slice through anything that won't
pull out, then re-lay the slabs as normal



Terry Fields July 19th 13 07:43 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
harryagain wrote:


"ss" wrote in message
...
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the best
way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will kill it off
and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots belong to
trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and the roots have
over the years forced their way through onto my land so I cant attack by
spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas


Chop them off, dig them out. You need a few inches of
scalpings/chippings/coarse sand under your new slabs anyway.
You can put some weedproof fabric down the hole before you put in the
scalpings. Not that is works so good anyway.

If you kill your neighbour's trees with weedkiller you won't be popular.


This was discussed some time ago in the legal group. It would appear
that any action that is taken to 'abate the nuisance' is fine, even if
the plant concerned winds up dead. I suggest the OP reposts in the
moderated legal group for more accurate information.

--
Terry Fields


Phil L July 19th 13 07:49 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
Terry Fields wrote:
This was discussed some time ago in the legal group. It would appear
that any action that is taken to 'abate the nuisance' is fine, even if
the plant concerned winds up dead. I suggest the OP reposts in the
moderated legal group for more accurate information.


I wouldn't advocate killing the shrubs in question, nor would it serve any
real purpose, in fact, I'd say it would create another problem for the OP -
if the shrubs die, a year or two down the line the roots will rot away, and
that's when his newly laid patio sinks.



The Natural Philosopher[_2_] July 19th 13 07:59 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
On 19/07/13 17:44, ss wrote:
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the
best way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will
kill it off and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots
belong to trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and
the roots have over the years forced their way through onto my land so
I cant attack by spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas

the best thing to do really is to dig a trench down a few feet at the
property or path boundary, cutting all the roots.

The depth will depend on what the roots are from. Some trees go very
deep. Others are relatively shallow

And fill it with concrete.

It needn't be wide at all.

killing the roots with anything but something that poisons the soil
forever is useless. They will come back.

The concrete wall will imply let the roots inside it die, and prevent
more lateral creep

You MAY be able to simply drive some steel shuttering down instead.

But the trick is to cut the roots and put in a barrier/.


--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.


The Natural Philosopher[_2_] July 19th 13 08:00 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
On 19/07/13 19:38, Phil L wrote:
ss wrote:
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the
best way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will
kill it off and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots
belong to trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and
the roots have over the years forced their way through onto my land
so I cant attack by spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my
property.

I've come across this many times...firstly, weedkiller doesn't work on
roots, it has to go in via the leaves, and it doesn't do anything to tree
roots anyway, at least not for many years after the tree is dead.

Best bet is to dig a trench along the wall where the offending plants /
trees are and chop everything off to a depth of a foot or two, then infill
with MOT, also throw a bag of cement in there and mix it up with a spade as
you're spreading it, this will effectively make the wall foundations a bit
more beefed up and hopefully keep the roots away for a decade or two.

Rake over the area you are working on and slice through anything that won't
pull out, then re-lay the slabs as normal


+ 0.5

MOT wont stop roots coming back. Use concrete instead.


--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.


ss July 19th 13 09:36 PM

Weedkiller / root killer
 
On 19/07/2013 19:59, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 19/07/13 17:44, ss wrote:
I am recently re laying some 2 x 3 slabs and replacing some badly laid
concrete with matching slabs, under the concrete there is a network of
roots, mostly fine stuff but a few at a 1cm thickness. What is the
best way to deal with this, ideally one of the weedkillers that will
kill it off and prevent regrowth for as long as possible. The roots
belong to trees/shrubs/ivy which is on the other side of my wall and
the roots have over the years forced their way through onto my land so
I cant attack by spraying the leaves as the shrubs are not my property.

Any ideas

the best thing to do really is to dig a trench down a few feet at the
property or path boundary, cutting all the roots.

The depth will depend on what the roots are from. Some trees go very
deep. Others are relatively shallow

And fill it with concrete.

It needn't be wide at all.

killing the roots with anything but something that poisons the soil
forever is useless. They will come back.

The concrete wall will imply let the roots inside it die, and prevent
more lateral creep

You MAY be able to simply drive some steel shuttering down instead.

But the trick is to cut the roots and put in a barrier/.


Thanks for the replies so far but to add to my problem ...I have just
built a 40 foot fence along the boundary wall and digging out the post
holes (using a manual auger) was tough going in places mainly due to
stones the roots didnt cause too much of an issue, its probably fair to
say that the roots have been snapped every 6 feet, I got most posts down
between 18-22 inches, having built this and in my 60s this plus moving
some slabs appears to have weakened my back so I wont be digging a
trench hence looking for something to kill the roots my side, most of
the patio area is and will remain intact, the strip where the roots are
is only 13" wide and about 30 feet long but had badly laid concrete
which I have now lifted. As I probably wont be around in 10 years I am
not too concerned if they eventually re appear, the current root
formations havent caused any issues that I can see.
Now I know it cant be bought and it is banned now but would #odium
klorate have done the trick.


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