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Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 28th 12, 03:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 283
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.


Our 1960s house has a corrugated roof of what is presumably cement
asbestos.

The roof is intact but there is some water ingress. I suspect this is due
to water entering through joints rather than permeating through the
asbestos cement.

The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss and
twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking panels
and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling dead branches.

Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?
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  #2  
Old April 28th 12, 04:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,661
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

Hugh - Was Invisible pretended :
The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss and
twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking panels and
the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling dead branches.

Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


The moss will be preventing the free draining, backing up the water,
which will then be flowing up the joints. Your only sensible solution,
is to get rid of the moss. You could caulk the visible inner ends of
the sheets at their lowest points which will help.

To kill the moss run bared copper wire across the roof's higher end, so
that the copper sulphate formed on the copper is washed down the length
of the roof.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


  #3  
Old April 28th 12, 04:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 283
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 16:04:02 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Hugh - Was Invisible pretended :
The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss
and twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking
panels and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling
dead branches.

Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


The moss will be preventing the free draining, backing up the water,
which will then be flowing up the joints. Your only sensible solution,
is to get rid of the moss. You could caulk the visible inner ends of the
sheets at their lowest points which will help.

To kill the moss run bared copper wire across the roof's higher end, so
that the copper sulphate formed on the copper is washed down the length
of the roof.

Thanks for the advice re the copper wire. Pity I can't wire up the bricked
patios or the block paving drive!
Have to be careful what I use to avoid staining.
  #4  
Old April 28th 12, 05:26 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 283
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 16:04:02 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Hugh - Was Invisible pretended :
The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss
and twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking
panels and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling
dead branches.

Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


The moss will be preventing the free draining, backing up the water,
which will then be flowing up the joints. Your only sensible solution,
is to get rid of the moss. You could caulk the visible inner ends of the
sheets at their lowest points which will help.

To kill the moss run bared copper wire across the roof's higher end, so
that the copper sulphate formed on the copper is washed down the length
of the roof.

Thanks for the advice re the copper wire. Pity I can't wire up the bricked
patios or the block paving drive!
Have to be careful what I use to avoid staining.
  #5  
Old April 28th 12, 06:14 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 638
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

Hugh - Was Invisible wrote:
Our 1960s house has a corrugated roof of what is presumably cement
asbestos.

The roof is intact but there is some water ingress. I suspect this is
due to water entering through joints rather than permeating through
the asbestos cement.

The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss
and twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking
panels and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling
dead branches.
Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


Hugh,

My old brain's a bit addled today, but is this the main roof of the house or
an outhouse/garage/shed?

Either way.

If the water is spread over a fair area on the underside, it may well be
condensation rather than a leak which some form of insulation on the
underside of the sheets will sort out - this is a problem I've seen quite
often in the past, especially in some of the old outside bogs that that
were around then (roofed with both asbestos and corrugated tin sheets).

If not, then the only ways to cure the problem is to either:

Clear the moss off and run mastic along the joints, around the rubber
washers under the nails and in any cracks and holes and then give the roof a
couple of coats of clear silicone liquid.

Or renew the sheets - which would be the better job.

Forget trying to seal porous sheets from underneath with liquid
waterproofers or paint, as whatever you use will simply fall off after a
while.

f you are convinced that the joints are the problem, try running one of the
mastics that you can apply on wet surfaces, along the joints on the inside -
I've had some good results with a No-Nails type of silicone mastic called
"Fix All" at around 4 a tube from my local UPVC suppliers [1]
(www.fixall.co.uk), and as a bonus, it'll stick the sheet edges securely as
well.

[1] At well under half the price of the stuff sold in the 'sheds' that
are still around, and under one and half times the price that Focus used to
sell it for.

As an aside to this, I was in a well known 'shed' the other day where
looking for some odd-ball material (failed as usual) where I saw ordinary
silicone mastic, made by another well know company, being sold for 8.50-ish
a tube (and I can by the equivalent from aforesaid UPVC supplier for arround
2).


Cash




  #6  
Old April 28th 12, 09:55 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 283
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 18:14:08 +0100, wrote:

Hugh - Was Invisible wrote:
Our 1960s house has a corrugated roof of what is presumably cement
asbestos.

The roof is intact but there is some water ingress. I suspect this is
due to water entering through joints rather than permeating through
the asbestos cement.

The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss
and twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking
panels and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling
dead branches.
Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


Hugh,

My old brain's a bit addled today, but is this the main roof of the
house or
an outhouse/garage/shed?

Either way.

If the water is spread over a fair area on the underside, it may well be
condensation rather than a leak which some form of insulation on the
underside of the sheets will sort out - this is a problem I've seen quite
often in the past, especially in some of the old outside bogs that that
were around then (roofed with both asbestos and corrugated tin sheets)..

If not, then the only ways to cure the problem is to either:

Clear the moss off and run mastic along the joints, around the rubber
washers under the nails and in any cracks and holes and then give the
roof a
couple of coats of clear silicone liquid.

Or renew the sheets - which would be the better job.

Forget trying to seal porous sheets from underneath with liquid
waterproofers or paint, as whatever you use will simply fall off after a
while.

f you are convinced that the joints are the problem, try running one of
the
mastics that you can apply on wet surfaces, along the joints on the
inside -
I've had some good results with a No-Nails type of silicone mastic called
"Fix All" at around 4 a tube from my local UPVC suppliers [1]
(www.fixall.co.uk), and as a bonus, it'll stick the sheet edges securely
as
well.

[1] At well under half the price of the stuff sold in the 'sheds' that
are still around, and under one and half times the price that Focus used
to
sell it for.

As an aside to this, I was in a well known 'shed' the other day where
looking for some odd-ball material (failed as usual) where I saw ordinary
silicone mastic, made by another well know company, being sold for
8.50-ish
a tube (and I can by the equivalent from aforesaid UPVC supplier for
arround
2).


Cash

Thanks for this. It is the garage. so who is more addled now?

I will have to sit in there when it is raining to try and identify what is
happening. It seems to be in one area in the middle.

For various reasons I do not want to replace the roof at present and am a
bit dubious about damaging the roof if I crawl across boards on it.
  #7  
Old April 28th 12, 10:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,016
Default Waterproofing a cement asbestos roof.

On 28/04/2012 15:36, Hugh - Was Invisible wrote:

Our 1960s house has a corrugated roof of what is presumably cement
asbestos.

The roof is intact but there is some water ingress. I suspect this is
due to water entering through joints rather than permeating through the
asbestos cement.

The roof is under a 60 feet high tree and has quite a coating of moss
and twigs. Removing them would be difficult without risking breaking
panels and the moss etc probably cushion the panels against falling dead
branches.

Any ideas of how I could waterproof it from the inside?


I expect you are on a hiding to nothing attempting to fix this from the
inside alas. By the time the water gets there, its too late.

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #8  
Old June 27th 14, 02:02 PM
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2014
Posts: 1
Default

There's all sorts of stuff/companies that'll do a proper job of waterproofing your asbestos for ya. One off the top of my head is Liquid Rubber : Liquid Rubber Asbestos Coatings | Asbestos Repair - Asbestos Encapsulation

We used them at work once - very good job.
 




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