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Building a breeze block wall



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 9th 11, 10:53 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
mo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Building a breeze block wall

Hi All

Wondering if anyone can give me tips with a small project.

I have an issue in my garden whereby I had a patio laid down, then had a
small brick wall built and then had some turf laid.

The issue is that the wall itself is a bit rubbish and is starting to
fall apart. Having spoken to a bricklayer by chance today he was
explaining to me about using breezeblocks to build a wall and then
covering with proper bricks or just rendering the whole thing.

I have decided I want to build a breezeblock wall that is maybe 2 -3
blocks high and 2 blocks out - which can then be used as seating

Current wall picture he

http://imageshack.us/g/577/img3028q.jpg/

I do not believe the grass/mud is putting any pressure on the wall
because it was filled in afterwards and is actually sloping away from
the wall.

My questions a

a) what is the best type of breeze block to use for this job? There are
so many

b) the bricklayer was explaining that you leave a gap beteen the blocks
(so sort of 2 walls) but you can put something in between them to make
it stronger - any ideas?

c) One problem I have with the patio is drainage, as you can see with
the current wall I have drilled a couple of holes on the floor level
which allows some water to go behind the wall into the mud. I would like
to make a better job of it this time - any ideas? I was thinking of
drilling some bigger holes into the bottom of the breezeblock and having
plastic piping going into the mud...

d) I plan to render the wall whe nfinished - any part that is visible -
but what about the back facing the mud - will it be OK left untouched or
will it need somesort of weatherproofing? bearing in my it could be wet
a lot of the time!

Any other things I should consider?
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  #2  
Old June 9th 11, 11:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,242
Default Building a breeze block wall

On Jun 9, 10:53*pm, mo wrote:
Hi All

Wondering if anyone can give me tips with a small project.

I have an issue in my garden whereby I had a patio laid down, then had a
small brick wall built and then had some turf laid.

The issue is that the wall itself is a bit rubbish and is starting to
fall apart. Having spoken to a bricklayer by chance today he was
explaining to me about using breezeblocks to build a wall and then
covering with proper bricks or just rendering the whole thing.

I have decided I want to build a breezeblock wall that is maybe 2 -3
blocks high and 2 blocks out - which can then be used as seating

Current wall picture he

http://imageshack.us/g/577/img3028q.jpg/

I do not believe the grass/mud is putting any pressure on the wall
because it was filled in afterwards and is actually sloping away from
the wall.

My questions a

a) what is the best type of breeze block to use for this job? There are
so many


Forget the term breeze block - it means different things to different
people.
I would use dense concrete blocks - they are pretty heavy. They are a
light
grey colour. Definitely do NOT use aircrete (thermalite, celcon etc).


b) the bricklayer was explaining that you leave a gap beteen the blocks
(so sort of 2 walls) but you can put something in between them to make
it stronger - any ideas?


Build it like a narrow bathtub, and fill with concrete.


c) One problem I have with the patio is drainage, as you can see with
the current wall I have drilled a couple of holes on the floor level
which allows some water to go behind the wall into the mud. I would like
to make a better job of it this time - any ideas? I was thinking of
drilling some bigger holes into the bottom of the breezeblock and having
plastic piping going into the mud...


If you are draining from the patio through the wall onto the grass,
you can build in some square
ducting (e.g. square drainpipe) right though the wall.
Or put a drain on the patio side of the wall and pipe it to a soakaway
etc.
Whatever, make sure the patio slopes slightly towards the drain.


d) I plan to render the wall whe nfinished - any part that is visible -
but what about the back facing the mud - will it be OK left untouched or
will it need somesort of weatherproofing? bearing in my it could be wet
a lot of the time!


Dense blocks will be fine and can just be painted. Render is OK but
will not last forever with
freeze / thaw cycles in the winter.
Make sure a coping stone is on top, to stop water running down behind
the render.


Any other things I should consider?


I still think a brick wall can look better.
Use engineering bricks and a coping stone on top.

Either way, foundations are required. Dig a trench and fill with
concrete and build off that.
Really deeper the better. Down a foot would be nice.
If doing it with 2 sides and concrete infill, you can even build in
some rebar to link with the concrete
centre of the wall.

Many other possibilities.

Simon.

  #3  
Old June 10th 11, 12:14 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,532
Default Building a breeze block wall

On Jun 9, 11:39*pm, sm_jamieson wrote:
On Jun 9, 10:53*pm, mo wrote:



Hi All


Wondering if anyone can give me tips with a small project.


I have an issue in my garden whereby I had a patio laid down, then had a
small brick wall built and then had some turf laid.


The issue is that the wall itself is a bit rubbish and is starting to
fall apart. Having spoken to a bricklayer by chance today he was


is this because it was built on top of the slabs? It needs a
foundation if its to last.


explaining to me about using breezeblocks to build a wall and then
covering with proper bricks or just rendering the whole thing.


I have decided I want to build a breezeblock wall that is maybe 2 -3
blocks high and 2 blocks out - which can then be used as seating


You can do, but its never going to look as good as bricks. Pick your
bricks with care, appearance makse all the difference.


Current wall picture he


http://imageshack.us/g/577/img3028q.jpg/


I do not believe the grass/mud is putting any pressure on the wall
because it was filled in afterwards and is actually sloping away from
the wall.


My questions a


a) what is the best type of breeze block to use for this job? There are
so many


Forget the term breeze block - it means different things to different
people.
I would use dense concrete blocks - they are pretty heavy. They are a
light
grey colour. Definitely do NOT use aircrete (thermalite, celcon etc).


ditto, any dense blocks.


b) the bricklayer was explaining that you leave a gap beteen the blocks
(so sort of 2 walls) but you can put something in between them to make
it stronger - any ideas?


Build it like a narrow bathtub, and fill with concrete.


yup. Or to be cheap you could bung in alternate layers of concrete and
hardcore.


c) One problem I have with the patio is drainage, as you can see with
the current wall I have drilled a couple of holes on the floor level
which allows some water to go behind the wall into the mud. I would like
to make a better job of it this time - any ideas? I was thinking of
drilling some bigger holes into the bottom of the breezeblock and having
plastic piping going into the mud...


just leave some vertical joints unfilled. Much easier.
Also putting gravel behind the wall helps with drainage. But with a
double skin 3 brick high wall I dont see this being much of an issue.


If you are draining from the patio through the wall onto the grass,
you can build in some square
ducting (e.g. square drainpipe) right though the wall.
Or put a drain on the patio side of the wall and pipe it to a soakaway
etc.
Whatever, make sure the patio slopes slightly towards the drain.



d) I plan to render the wall whe nfinished - any part that is visible -
but what about the back facing the mud - will it be OK left untouched or
will it need somesort of weatherproofing? bearing in my it could be wet
a lot of the time!


Dense blocks will be fine and can just be painted. Render is OK but
will not last forever with
freeze / thaw cycles in the winter.
Make sure a coping stone is on top, to stop water running down behind
the render.


Honestly I'd avoid render. Render means ongoing maintenance, both
painting and occasionally rerendering. Brick doesnt need this. If
you're determined to save time & money by using blocks, you could just
flush point them and paint. Its lightweight blocks that must be
rendered outside.


Any other things I should consider?


I still think a brick wall can look better.
Use engineering bricks and a coping stone on top.

Either way, foundations are required. Dig a trench and fill with
concrete and build off that.
Really deeper the better. Down a foot would be nice.
If doing it with 2 sides and concrete infill, you can even build in
some rebar to link with the concrete
centre of the wall.


yes, but I cant see that being needed.


Many other possibilities.

Simon.



NT
  #4  
Old June 10th 11, 12:19 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,532
Default Building a breeze block wall

On Jun 10, 12:14*am, Tabby wrote:
On Jun 9, 11:39*pm, sm_jamieson wrote:

On Jun 9, 10:53*pm, mo wrote:


Hi All


Wondering if anyone can give me tips with a small project.


I have an issue in my garden whereby I had a patio laid down, then had a
small brick wall built and then had some turf laid.


The issue is that the wall itself is a bit rubbish and is starting to
fall apart. Having spoken to a bricklayer by chance today he was


is this because it was built on top of the slabs? It needs a
foundation if its to last.

explaining to me about using breezeblocks to build a wall and then
covering with proper bricks or just rendering the whole thing.


I have decided I want to build a breezeblock wall that is maybe 2 -3
blocks high and 2 blocks out - which can then be used as seating


You can do, but its never going to look as good as bricks. Pick your
bricks with care, appearance makse all the difference.



Current wall picture he


http://imageshack.us/g/577/img3028q.jpg/


I do not believe the grass/mud is putting any pressure on the wall
because it was filled in afterwards and is actually sloping away from
the wall.


My questions a


a) what is the best type of breeze block to use for this job? There are
so many


Forget the term breeze block - it means different things to different
people.
I would use dense concrete blocks - they are pretty heavy. They are a
light
grey colour. Definitely do NOT use aircrete (thermalite, celcon etc).


ditto, any dense blocks.

b) the bricklayer was explaining that you leave a gap beteen the blocks
(so sort of 2 walls) but you can put something in between them to make
it stronger - any ideas?


Build it like a narrow bathtub, and fill with concrete.


yup. Or to be cheap you could bung in alternate layers of concrete and
hardcore.

c) One problem I have with the patio is drainage, as you can see with
the current wall I have drilled a couple of holes on the floor level
which allows some water to go behind the wall into the mud. I would like
to make a better job of it this time - any ideas? I was thinking of
drilling some bigger holes into the bottom of the breezeblock and having
plastic piping going into the mud...


just leave some vertical joints unfilled. Much easier.
Also putting gravel behind the wall helps with drainage. But with a
double skin 3 brick high wall I dont see this being much of an issue.



If you are draining from the patio through the wall onto the grass,
you can build in some square
ducting (e.g. square drainpipe) right though the wall.
Or put a drain on the patio side of the wall and pipe it to a soakaway
etc.
Whatever, make sure the patio slopes slightly towards the drain.


d) I plan to render the wall whe nfinished - any part that is visible -
but what about the back facing the mud - will it be OK left untouched or
will it need somesort of weatherproofing? bearing in my it could be wet
a lot of the time!


Dense blocks will be fine and can just be painted. Render is OK but
will not last forever with
freeze / thaw cycles in the winter.
Make sure a coping stone is on top, to stop water running down behind
the render.


Honestly I'd avoid render. Render means ongoing maintenance, both
painting and occasionally rerendering. Brick doesnt need this. If
you're determined to save time & money by using blocks, you could just
flush point them and paint. Its lightweight blocks that must be
rendered outside.

Any other things I should consider?


I still think a brick wall can look better.
Use engineering bricks and a coping stone on top.


Either way, foundations are required. Dig a trench and fill with
concrete and build off that.
Really deeper the better. Down a foot would be nice.
If doing it with 2 sides and concrete infill, you can even build in
some rebar to link with the concrete
centre of the wall.


yes, but I cant see that being needed.

Many other possibilities.


Simon.


NT


One other point: if using brick, you can use a bond that interlinks
the 2 wall leaves using bricks. You only need use a small number of
bricks that connect the leaves together.

Its also possible to do this using block for the rear leaf, just
filling the resulting holes in the block leaf with mortar.


NT
  #5  
Old June 10th 11, 08:09 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,377
Default Building a breeze block wall



"mo" wrote in message
...
Hi All

Wondering if anyone can give me tips with a small project.


Its only 12" high and you say the ground slopes away at the rear so its not
actually retaining much.

I would be tempted to dig a trench behind it, build you new skin behind the
existing one and then fill with concrete using the existing brick work as
the facing.

If you want higher seating you can always raise it up using timber which is
much nicer to sit on than concrete blocks.

While you are digging the trench put some soakaways in to stop the grass
being mud.

  #6  
Old June 11th 11, 01:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,997
Default Building a breeze block wall

In article ,
sm_jamieson writes:
Forget the term breeze block - it means different things to different
people.


Real breeze blocks haven't been used since 1920-1930's.
Both breeze blocks and clinker blocks which replaced them can leach
out nasty chemicals when they get wet. Breeze eventually fall to
bits if kept wet (depends what particular chemical process ash/effluent
was used to make them, and how much soluable material was present).

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
 




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