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Trickle vents in replacement windows



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 11th 11, 11:33 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 35
Default Trickle vents in replacement windows

When we had some windows replaced about 7 years ago, they didn't come
with trickle vents (BTW, I don't mean night vent locking position
feature). We like this as it seems bizarre to buy new energy efficient
windows and then drill holes in them to let cold air in. A friend got
some around the same time (from Anglian) which did have them - I've no
idea if they were requested.

Anyway, we're due to get some more replaced soon, and I wondered what
the current position was regarding trickle vents. I'm aware they're
there to avoid damp, but the existing windows we have (old aluminium
double glazed windows without a thermal break) are airtight and we don't
have damp problems in rooms. The only problem we have with the windows
is they get covered in condensation because of the lack of thermal
break. This is one of the reasons we're replacing them.

So, do people see trickle vents as necessary, ideal, waste of time,
legally required? If we want some air in, we can open the window a little.

Thanks

David
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  #2  
Old February 11th 11, 12:59 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 215
Default Trickle vents in replacement windows

On Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:33:58 +0000, David Hearn
wrote:


So, do people see trickle vents as necessary, ideal, waste of time,
legally required? If we want some air in, we can open the window a little.

I've been puzzling over this recently. None of the 20-year-old windows
that I inherited with this house had vents but the patio door had a
fake one. When I had this replaced by french doors nearly three years
ago the d/g surveyor insisted on a vent although the salesman thought
the size of the room made it unneccessary. Two windows installed in my
extension during construction last year have vents. None of the
remaining windows that I had replaced in January have them. It could
be a question of replacing like with like, I don't know, but vents
weren't mentioned at all and I never thought about them until after
the job was finished. Being thin plastic vents can't do much for the
thermal efficiency of the windows.
  #3  
Old February 11th 11, 03:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,361
Default Trickle vents in replacement windows


Possibly out of date, but I did check with our BCO when I did our loft
conversion, and he would have been happy with the two position lock
instead of the trickle vent...


Yes, it's still the case that a locked-partially-open position is an
acceptable alternative to trickle vents.

However building regs do insist on some of permanent background
ventilation.

That can be a whole-house ventilation system, ventilation bricks, or
window trickle vents.

There's a formula for the vent minimum area based, based on floor area
of the room, but can't recall the % right now.
  #5  
Old February 11th 11, 04:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Trickle vents in replacement windows

In message
,
" writes

Possibly out of date, but I did check with our BCO when I did our loft
conversion, and he would have been happy with the two position lock
instead of the trickle vent...


Yes, it's still the case that a locked-partially-open position is an
acceptable alternative to trickle vents.

However building regs do insist on some of permanent background
ventilation.

That can be a whole-house ventilation system, ventilation bricks, or
window trickle vents.

There's a formula for the vent minimum area based, based on floor area
of the room, but can't recall the % right now.


Two years ago, I had a very small 'lean-to' extension built off the back
of the kitchen. It is only 2.3m x 2.3m internally, and is divided by a
wall+door into a toilet+shower, and a utility room. [Some would say a
'utility cupboard'!]

There are three windows (all two-position locking) and, after delivery,
the builder 'retro-fitted' trickle vent kits to all three. "New building
regulations" was his explanation.

There are also two extraction fans and vents. One is in the
toilet+shower part (which I expected), and another in the utility room
part (which I didn't - "building regulations" again).

Needless to say, the trickle vents have never been opened in anger!
--
Ian
  #6  
Old February 11th 11, 05:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,762
Default Trickle vents in replacement windows

In article ,
John Rumm writes:
Possibly out of date, but I did check with our BCO when I did our loft
conversion, and he would have been happy with the two position lock
instead of the trickle vent...


Yes, 9 years ago when mine were done, trickle vents were required on
any windows which couldn't be locked in crack-open position (which
would only have been patio doors, except I didn't have any;-)

Trickle vents can be closed when you don't want the ventilation.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #9  
Old February 14th 11, 03:41 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 230
Default Trickle vents in replacement windows

On Feb 11, 8:25*pm, fred wrote:
In article , David Hearn
writesOn 11/02/2011 15:42, wrote:

There's a formula for the vent minimum area based, based on floor area
of the room, but can't recall the % right now.


Is that the case for window replacement (if the existing windows do not
have any permanent background ventilation), or just for new
builds/extensions/conversions etc?


I'm afraid the need for background ventilation is re-assessed on window
replacement and it makes no difference if the old ones had it or not.


....but AFAIK a BCO won't be involved when windows are replaced without
other building work, and DG companies will provide whatever you ask
for.

Cheers,
David.
 




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