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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Spray painting MDF…?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 2nd 10, 11:19 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 594
Default Spray painting MDF…?

Having been looking at fireplace mantelpieces I am finding that in the
style and price range I'm looking at the majority seem to be rather
simple affairs made out of sprayed MDF so I've decided to try my hand
at making my own.

The design and construction of the mantel should not be a problem
however I would like a super-smooth white finish (no brush marks) and
figured my best bet to achieve would be spray painting. Based on this
premise, I have a few questions:

1. Will spray cans from the likes of Plastikote suffice? (e.g.
http://www.plasti-kote.co.uk/Product/pcode---4181) Depending on the
success of this project it could well be a one-off so is the
alternative expense of a compressor/gun justifiable?

2. The use of MDF will presumably absolutely priming - I do have a tin
of MDF primer but will my desired super-smooth finish be compromised
by applying said primer with a brush? Alternatively, Plastikote do do
a spray primer if that would likely be better?

3. Will undercoat be required?

4. It was my intention to go for a Satin finish on the basis that this
would give me some of the shine of gloss but the surface forgiveness
of matt?

5. Any tips or things I should be aware of?

Sorry for all these questions, but if you can help steer me on the
right path it would be appreciated.

Mathew
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  #2  
Old November 2nd 10, 11:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,595
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On 02/11/2010 11:19, Mathew Newton wrote:
Having been looking at fireplace mantelpieces I am finding that in the
style and price range I'm looking at the majority seem to be rather
simple affairs made out of sprayed MDF so I've decided to try my hand
at making my own.

The design and construction of the mantel should not be a problem
however I would like a super-smooth white finish (no brush marks) and
figured my best bet to achieve would be spray painting. Based on this
premise, I have a few questions:

1. Will spray cans from the likes of Plastikote suffice? (e.g.
http://www.plasti-kote.co.uk/Product/pcode---4181) Depending on the
success of this project it could well be a one-off so is the
alternative expense of a compressor/gun justifiable?

2. The use of MDF will presumably absolutely priming - I do have a tin
of MDF primer but will my desired super-smooth finish be compromised
by applying said primer with a brush? Alternatively, Plastikote do do
a spray primer if that would likely be better?

3. Will undercoat be required?

4. It was my intention to go for a Satin finish on the basis that this
would give me some of the shine of gloss but the surface forgiveness
of matt?

5. Any tips or things I should be aware of?

Sorry for all these questions, but if you can help steer me on the
right path it would be appreciated.

Mathew


MDF isn't the easiest stuff to finish because the face of the board is a
different consistency to the edges. IME getting the edges as smooth and
non-absorbent as the faces requires a lot of fine filling and sanding.

You're either good at spraying or you're not. I watched a hoodlum
refinishing a car wing in our local car park. Perfect job with just an
aerosol can. I couldn't get close, whatever equipment I had.
  #3  
Old November 2nd 10, 12:34 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,146
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On 2 Nov, 11:58, stuart noble wrote:

MDF isn't the easiest stuff to finish because the face of the board is a
different consistency to the edges.


Also the problem of water-based primers raising surface fibres.

I just use a few coats of cheap shellac on both. Takes about three
coats to do edges.
  #4  
Old November 2nd 10, 01:59 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,532
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On Nov 2, 11:19*am, Mathew Newton wrote:

Having been looking at fireplace mantelpieces I am finding that in the
style and price range I'm looking at the majority seem to be rather
simple affairs made out of sprayed MDF so I've decided to try my hand
at making my own.

The design and construction of the mantel should not be a problem
however I would like a super-smooth white finish (no brush marks) and
figured my best bet to achieve would be spray painting. Based on this
premise, I have a few questions:

1. Will spray cans from the likes of Plastikote suffice? (e.g.http://www.plasti-kote.co.uk/Product/pcode---4181) Depending on the
success of this project it could well be a one-off so is the
alternative expense of a compressor/gun justifiable?


any spray can should do. Cans, or the paint therein, vary a lot in
their characteristics though, point it at a bit of scrap for a moment
first.


2. The use of MDF will presumably absolutely priming - I do have a tin
of MDF primer but will my desired super-smooth finish be compromised
by applying said primer with a brush? Alternatively, Plastikote do do
a spray primer if that would likely be better?

3. Will undercoat be required?

4. It was my intention to go for a Satin finish on the basis that this
would give me some of the shine of gloss but the surface forgiveness
of matt?

5. Any tips or things I should be aware of?

Sorry for all these questions, but if you can help steer me on the
right path it would be appreciated.

Mathew


A key point when spray painting is to do all the least important bits
first, such as edges, recesses etc. Only then go over all the major
areas - the latter will then be the flawless bits.

Spray cans tend to use very thin paint nowadays, requiring many very
thin coats to be applied.


NT
  #5  
Old November 2nd 10, 08:08 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 594
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On Nov 2, 1:59*pm, Tabby wrote:

A key point when spray painting is to do all the least important bits
first, such as edges, recesses etc. Only then go over all the major
areas - the latter will then be the flawless bits.


Makes sense - thanks for that tip.

Spray cans tend to use very thin paint nowadays, requiring many very
thin coats to be applied.


Do you think it will be an issue me applying primer with a brush? Or
would I be better using a spray primer (or shellac as used by Andy)?

Mathew
  #6  
Old November 2nd 10, 10:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,146
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On 2 Nov, 20:08, Mathew Newton wrote:

Do you think it will be an issue me applying primer with a brush? Or
would I be better using a spray primer (or shellac as used by Andy)?


Spray cans are an expensive way to do anything. I only use them when I
can't do it any other way.

If you're brushing shellac, use a cheap artist's nylon (aka "Golden
Taklon") 3/4" filbert. Don't clean it, just wipe it, let it go hard,
then soften it with more shellac next time. Nylon (or at least
synthetic) bristles are the trick.
  #7  
Old November 2nd 10, 10:44 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,717
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On Nov 2, 11:19 am, Mathew Newton wrote:
Having been looking at fireplace mantelpieces I am finding that in the
style and price range I'm looking at the majority seem to be rather
simple affairs made out of sprayed MDF so I've decided to try my hand
at making my own.

The design and construction of the mantel should not be a problem
however I would like a super-smooth white finish (no brush marks) and
figured my best bet to achieve would be spray painting. Based on this
premise, I have a few questions:

1. Will spray cans from the likes of Plastikote suffice? (e.g.http://www.plasti-kote.co.uk/Product/pcode---4181) Depending on the
success of this project it could well be a one-off so is the
alternative expense of a compressor/gun justifiable?


2. The use of MDF will presumably absolutely priming - I do have a tin
of MDF primer but will my desired super-smooth finish be compromised
by applying said primer with a brush? Alternatively, Plastikote do do
a spray primer if that would likely be better?

3. Will undercoat be required?

4. It was my intention to go for a Satin finish on the basis that this
would give me some of the shine of gloss but the surface forgiveness
of matt?

5. Any tips or things I should be aware of?

Sorry for all these questions, but if you can help steer me on the
right path it would be appreciated.

Mathew


FWIW I recently sprayed a plywood bathroom window cill in Plastikote
gloss white, ontop of High Build primer (car), on top of primer and
fine filler to bung the grain up (which you won;t have being MDF)

Looked fantastic and still looks v. good - but the white plastikote
top layer does seem rather sensitive to scratches, chips and most
annoyingly the kids' bath toys - a wet submarine for e.g left definite
indented marks in the surface when moved the next day - which was not
the desired effect!! Twas almost like the submarine had stuck/melted
to the paint??

Spose could be a reaction between the different layers/types of paint
I used? certainly when I tried to over lacquer the plastikote with car
lacquer (on a test piece) it reacted badly and effectively ruined the
plastikote layer....

I wonder if using all car paints (from paint factor not halfords ;))
would be a better route next time?

Jim K
  #8  
Old November 3rd 10, 01:41 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,532
Default Spray painting MDF…?

On Nov 2, 8:08*pm, Mathew Newton wrote:
On Nov 2, 1:59*pm, Tabby wrote:

A key point when spray painting is to do all the least important bits
first, such as edges, recesses etc. Only then go over all the major
areas - the latter will then be the flawless bits.


Makes sense - thanks for that tip.

Spray cans tend to use very thin paint nowadays, requiring many very
thin coats to be applied.


Do you think it will be an issue me applying primer with a brush? Or
would I be better using a spray primer (or shellac as used by Andy)?

Mathew


I havent spray painted in a while, but if going to the trouble of
spraying for a great finish I wouldnt want to d that onto an icky
brushpainted layer.


NT
  #9  
Old November 3rd 10, 09:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 802
Default Spray painting MDF…?

Andy Dingley wrote:
On 2 Nov, 20:08, Mathew Newton wrote:

Do you think it will be an issue me applying primer with a brush? Or
would I be better using a spray primer (or shellac as used by Andy)?


Spray cans are an expensive way to do anything. I only use them when I
can't do it any other way.


I've just sprayed a couple of kitchen cabinet doors to get a smooth
finish. Used grey primer undercoat a pound a can from Poundland. Seemed
to work well. Much better than my attempt at brushing although the
brushing effect would probably have been better if I had thinned it a
bit more.

Andrew
  #10  
Old November 3rd 10, 06:59 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 113
Default Spray painting MDF…?

In message
Jim K wrote:

On Nov 2, 11:19 am, Mathew Newton wrote:
Having been looking at fireplace mantelpieces I am finding that
in the style and price range I'm looking at the majority seem
to be rather simple affairs made out of sprayed MDF so I've
decided to try my hand at making my own.


Spose could be a reaction between the different layers/types of
paint I used? certainly when I tried to over lacquer the
plastikote with car lacquer (on a test piece) it reacted badly
and effectively ruined the plastikote layer....

I wonder if using all car paints (from paint factor not halfords
;)) would be a better route next time?

Jim K


You are supposed to use the same paint type when using highly
volatile paints like Plasti-Kote because the thinner can cause
adverse reactions, even when using the exact paint type and
thinner can still cause reactions, as there is a time frame to
apply or reapply these types of volatile solvent based paints,
which tend to bond a bit like cellulose by softening the
underneath layer, of course this doesn't apply to conventional oil
or water based paints, usually just car paints.

Stephen.


--
http://www.stephen.hull.btinternet.co.uk
Coach painting tips and techniques + Land Rover colour codes
"Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble". Henry Royce
 




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