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Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external wooden window sills?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 17th 10, 04:13 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 484
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external wooden window sills?


Some of the windows in the South side of my house have wooden frames and
sills, and on the outside of the house, most of the paint has flaked off,
leaving bare wood that is severely sun-baked and weather-beaten, yet
thankfully, with almost no rot. I have recently bought this house and I now
want to paint the external side of these frames to prolong their life as
much as possible. What is a good primer to use? What soaks into dry wood
well, and stays put, even over the duration of a long hot summer or three?

I'm under the impression that aluminium primer is good. I guess it must
soak into dry wood well, because it is very runny, compared to other wood
primers, some of which have the consistency of cheese spread! It seems to
cost more than other primers, which also suggests to me that it might be
particularly good for some applications.

Anyone got any strong opinions on this?

Al.
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  #2  
Old September 17th 10, 08:53 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 289
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external wooden window sills?


"AL_n" wrote in message
...

Some of the windows in the South side of my house have wooden frames and
sills, and on the outside of the house, most of the paint has flaked off,
leaving bare wood that is severely sun-baked and weather-beaten, yet
thankfully, with almost no rot. I have recently bought this house and I
now
want to paint the external side of these frames to prolong their life as
much as possible. What is a good primer to use? What soaks into dry wood
well, and stays put, even over the duration of a long hot summer or three?

I'm under the impression that aluminium primer is good. I guess it must
soak into dry wood well, because it is very runny, compared to other wood
primers, some of which have the consistency of cheese spread! It seems to
cost more than other primers, which also suggests to me that it might be
particularly good for some applications.

Anyone got any strong opinions on this?



You could do worse than going to a big paint manufacturer and buying their
best quality exterior paint. They do actually carry out research and
development and test and improve their paints. Dulux (ICI) Weathershield for
instance is a good paint system. You must _not_ buy your paint from a
retail/diy outlet because even if it is labelled Dulux Weathershield (for
instance) it is water based and a totally different paint to the oil based
trade paint from the trade supplier. The quality of diy paint is always
compromised in order to give it 'marketable' qualities like easy brush
washing or non drip consistency.

Alternatively you can stick with more traditional oil paints and get a good
result. Metallic primers have been used for years as yacht paints, with
instructions to start with thinned primer then apply several more coats of
primer before undercoating. Gloss, gloss, gloss is another method I have
seen used on historic buildings with traditional paints, whereby you just
use gloss from first to last coat and keep going till you have the finish
you want.

I would treat the bare wood with cuprinol and let it dry well before you
paint.

Tim W


  #3  
Old September 17th 10, 09:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,906
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

On 17/09/2010 04:13, AL_n wrote:
Some of the windows in the South side of my house have wooden frames and
sills, and on the outside of the house, most of the paint has flaked off,
leaving bare wood that is severely sun-baked and weather-beaten, yet
thankfully, with almost no rot. I have recently bought this house and I now
want to paint the external side of these frames to prolong their life as
much as possible. What is a good primer to use? What soaks into dry wood
well, and stays put, even over the duration of a long hot summer or three?

I'm under the impression that aluminium primer is good. I guess it must
soak into dry wood well, because it is very runny, compared to other wood
primers, some of which have the consistency of cheese spread! It seems to
cost more than other primers, which also suggests to me that it might be
particularly good for some applications.

Anyone got any strong opinions on this?

Al.


2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...Hardener-500ml


If the paint is off and you're seeing that grey look, it's the perfect
opportunity, and you'll probably never have to paint again. The wood
doesn't have to be "rotten" to benefit. I've even used it on brand new wood.
  #4  
Old September 17th 10, 10:37 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,600
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

stuart noble wrote:
On 17/09/2010 04:13, AL_n wrote:
Some of the windows in the South side of my house have wooden frames and
sills, and on the outside of the house, most of the paint has flaked off,
leaving bare wood that is severely sun-baked and weather-beaten, yet
thankfully, with almost no rot. I have recently bought this house and
I now
want to paint the external side of these frames to prolong their life as
much as possible. What is a good primer to use? What soaks into dry wood
well, and stays put, even over the duration of a long hot summer or
three?

I'm under the impression that aluminium primer is good. I guess it must
soak into dry wood well, because it is very runny, compared to other wood
primers, some of which have the consistency of cheese spread! It seems to
cost more than other primers, which also suggests to me that it might be
particularly good for some applications.

Anyone got any strong opinions on this?

Al.


2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...Hardener-500ml


If the paint is off and you're seeing that grey look, it's the perfect
opportunity, and you'll probably never have to paint again. The wood
doesn't have to be "rotten" to benefit. I've even used it on brand new
wood.


Good idea. I used this sort of product once on rotting wood, and it
really turns the surface into a wood/resin composite and totally
stabilises it.

After that any sort of grain filling primer for outdoor use will be fine.

  #5  
Old September 17th 10, 01:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external wooden window sills?


Sikkens Rubbol is a good product.


--
Airport Shuttle

'' (http://www.yourcityride.com)
Message origin: TRAVEL.com

  #6  
Old September 17th 10, 06:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 484
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external wooden window sills?

The Natural Philosopher wrote in
:


2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...-Rot-Wood-Hard
ener-500ml


If the paint is off and you're seeing that grey look, it's the
perfect opportunity, and you'll probably never have to paint again.
The wood doesn't have to be "rotten" to benefit. I've even used it on
brand new wood.


Good idea. I used this sort of product once on rotting wood, and it
really turns the surface into a wood/resin composite and totally
stabilises it.

After that any sort of grain filling primer for outdoor use will be
fine.



Thanks to all, for the advice thus far. Yes indeed, the woodwork has gone
grey, and the grain is also standing out, almost as if it has been sand-
blasted. So I will take the advice, and try the said product. Thanks.

Al
  #7  
Old September 17th 10, 08:13 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 123
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

On Sep 17, 8:53*am, "Tim W" wrote:

You must _not_ buy your paint from a
retail/diy outlet because even if it is labelled Dulux Weathershield (for
instance) it is water based and a totally different paint to the oil based
trade paint from the trade supplier. The quality of diy paint is always
compromised in order to give it 'marketable' qualities like easy brush
washing or non drip consistency.


You could do a lot worse than seeking out your local trade paint
supplier -- which may be a more difficult exercise than you'd think.
Around here a lot of the painters and decorators actually use local
retail stores to buy their paint,presumably on attractive terms. That
allows them to direct individual clients to the retail store in
question to see wallpaper patterns etc. And significant numbers also
use the paint manufacturers' "trade centres" -- where increasingly
they sell to the public as well -- at an exorbitant price.

I was asked today to pick up an order at the local Dulux Trade
Centre. Almost 50 for five litres of emulsion paint. All I can
say is that I certainly would not even think of buying there for
myself.

Running a caravan site we have trade accounts with a number of
suppliers of various sorts. Our fire extinguisher contract is with a
company who also (interesting combination of interests!) run the best
trade paint centre in the area. I've been dealing with them for
thirty years. Their fire-extinguisher maintenance charges are
approximately half the cost of the big "national" companies and the
whole exercise is trouble-free. Their paint prices are about a third
of the price of the big names and the materials they supply are always
fit for the job. And they do the whole range -- automobile and
agricultural as well (just in case you want to repaint your little
grey Fergie in exactly the authentic shade!). No fancy showroom -- no
showroom of any sort. Just a trade counter. And they're quite happy
to supply over it to anyone -- though we obviously have an account
with them anyway. Companies like that are worth their weight in
gold.
  #8  
Old September 17th 10, 10:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
jkn
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Posts: 382
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

Hi Stuart

2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...-Rot-Wood-Hard...


[...]

Fine, but that Ronseal stuff isn't 2-part, is it?

I'd buy a two-part version if I came across it...

J^n
  #9  
Old September 18th 10, 08:27 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,906
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

On 17/09/2010 22:11, jkn wrote:
Hi Stuart

2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...-Rot-Wood-Hard...


[...]

Fine, but that Ronseal stuff isn't 2-part, is it?


On reading the COSH data, maybe not, but then why the big plastic cap on
the can? That usually contains the hardener IME.
Can't vouch for it if it's not 2 part but maybe it works well enough
with an acetone solvent

I'd buy a two-part version if I came across it...

J^n



  #10  
Old September 18th 10, 08:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 511
Default Best wood primer of old, unpainted dried out external woodenwindow sills?

On 18 Sep, 08:27, stuart noble wrote:
On 17/09/2010 22:11, jkn wrote:

Hi Stuart


2 part wood hardener. Having tried all sorts over the years, that's a
very strong opinion :-)


http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63540/...-Rot-Wood-Hard...


[...]


Fine, but that Ronseal stuff isn't 2-part, is it?


On reading the COSH data, maybe not, but then why the big plastic cap on
the can? That usually contains the hardener IME.
Can't vouch for it if it's not 2 part but maybe it works well enough
with an acetone solvent


strewth....
the big plastic cap is the "handy" kettle in which to pour some
(single part) hardener (styrene) and dip your (single use) brush.....

where's this "2 part wood hardener" then??

gotta proper link????

Jim K
 




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