A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » UK diy
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Piano wheels



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old August 22nd 10, 11:26 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 548
Default Piano wheels

Tim Watts wrote:

Re the castor cups - do you think they'd work on slate? I can see them
(assuming they are plastic) getting ground away in pretty short order.


Run of the mill castor cups are thermosetting plastic with a disc of
nylon or (in the deluxe version Teflon) bonded to the base. They will
last forever.

I recommend you find a location for the piano and aim not to move it!
Use castor cups for everyday floor protection.

If you need to move the piano occasionally to decorate behind, buy or
improvise a temporary dolly.

If you are set on using the rubber wheels shown, then screw them in
place of the existing castors.
Ads
  #12  
Old August 22nd 10, 11:38 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,362
Default Piano wheels

Dave Osborne wrote:

Tim Watts wrote:

Re the castor cups - do you think they'd work on slate? I can see them
(assuming they are plastic) getting ground away in pretty short order.


Run of the mill castor cups are thermosetting plastic with a disc of
nylon or (in the deluxe version Teflon) bonded to the base. They will
last forever.

I recommend you find a location for the piano and aim not to move it!
Use castor cups for everyday floor protection.

If you need to move the piano occasionally to decorate behind, buy or
improvise a temporary dolly.

If you are set on using the rubber wheels shown, then screw them in
place of the existing castors.


I'm very much against having stuff I can't move without a huge effort
(especially now as I need to move stuff around for fixing the house and if
nothing else, it always gets filthy down the back).

I'll try with various sheets of material as a sliding sheet (aiming that the
sheet remains still on the floor and the piano slides on the sheet) and if
that doesn't work, I'll go talk to the piano shop in T Wells and ask about
castors.

Thinking about the height variation with large castors, that can always be
solved by a footrest in front of the pedals.

The emphasis here is pianos are very nice, unless they hamper everything I
try and do around them. Compromises are fine because if this thing gets in
my way too often, it's out the door! It's already in my bad books for
scratching the dining room floor (despite being delivered on a dolly). I'm
pretty sure the scratches will disappear with another coat of floor sealer,
but I don't want to be doing that too often.

I'll check out some felt glides too, possibly something in metal with wide
area.

Cheers

Tim

--
Tim Watts
  #13  
Old August 22nd 10, 11:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 548
Default Piano wheels

Andrew Gabriel wrote:
In article ,
Dave Osborne writes:
If you put large diameter wheels permanently on (the bottom of) a piano,
you will have to consider that you will be raising the piano up, which
means that the pedals will be off the floor, the keyboard will be too
high and you may not have enough adjustment in the bench. To get around
this you would need to put the piano on a dolly which was big enough to
put the bench on as well. This would not look good in a domestic
environment.


I've seen larger casters fixed on outriggers on upright pianos
in schools. Enables the piano to remain correct hight off the
ground, and adds stability when wheeling. Tried googling but I
couldn't find any pictures. Probably got some special name.


AOL Can't find 'em either. I've got a feeling some have some sort of
cam arrangement, so you jack the piano up off its normal casters to move
it and drop it down again when in place.

Did find these, tho'

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/723.html

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/725.html
  #14  
Old August 22nd 10, 12:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 548
Default Piano wheels

Dave Osborne wrote:
Andrew Gabriel wrote:
In article ,
Dave Osborne writes:
If you put large diameter wheels permanently on (the bottom of) a
piano, you will have to consider that you will be raising the piano
up, which means that the pedals will be off the floor, the keyboard
will be too high and you may not have enough adjustment in the bench.
To get around this you would need to put the piano on a dolly which
was big enough to put the bench on as well. This would not look good
in a domestic environment.


I've seen larger casters fixed on outriggers on upright pianos
in schools. Enables the piano to remain correct hight off the
ground, and adds stability when wheeling. Tried googling but I
couldn't find any pictures. Probably got some special name.


AOL Can't find 'em either. I've got a feeling some have some sort of
cam arrangement, so you jack the piano up off its normal casters to move
it and drop it down again when in place.

Did find these, tho'

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/723.html

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/725.html


and this:

http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...ment/m106.html
  #15  
Old August 22nd 10, 12:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 987
Default Piano wheels

On 8/22/2010 5:57 AM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

How about a bit of ply (15mm?) and thick carpet glued firmly
together? Carpet back to ply, use with pile side against the slate
floor. You may need something noslip on the other side of the ply to
stop the piano sliding on the ply


Or shallow recesses in the plywood?
  #16  
Old August 22nd 10, 01:16 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,362
Default Piano wheels

Dave Osborne wrote:


http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/725.html


Those look like the business - thanks! Minimum fitting and big runner
wheels.

I bet they cost, but they'll be worth it

Cheers

Tim

--
Tim Watts
  #17  
Old August 23rd 10, 02:54 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,330
Default Piano wheels

On Sun, 22 Aug 2010 13:16:39 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

Dave Osborne wrote:


http://www.fletcher-newman.co.uk/cat...stors/725.html


Those look like the business - thanks! Minimum fitting and big runner
wheels.

I bet they cost, but they'll be worth it


In the spirit of the group, build yourself a hover-piano... :-)

Our piano's early 1900s and weighs a flippin' ton - was a chore getting
it across the hardwood floors without damaging them. I re-christened it
the paino.

cheers

Jules
  #18  
Old July 28th 12, 03:50 PM
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2012
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules Richardson View Post
On Sun, 22 Aug 2010 13:16:39 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

Dave Osborne wrote:


Telescopic Safety Brackets Safety Brackets for upright pianos


Those look like the business - thanks! Minimum fitting and big runner
wheels.

I bet they cost, but they'll be worth it


In the spirit of the group, build yourself a hover-piano... :-)

Our piano's early 1900s and weighs a flippin' ton - was a chore getting
it across the hardwood floors without damaging them. I re-christened it
the paino.

cheers

Jules

you have more than likely sorted this out but for future readers

if its a 1900 piano then it more than likely has front toes this type of piano needs a rear toe kit if it is to be moved a lot, as the piano is back heavy However, if you do not intend to move it a lot then stranded homa castors will do with rubber wheels.

Modern pianos with no toe need a cradle type castor for stability

Fixing new casters to a piano is not difficult However, Putting the wrong type of castors on a piano can be dangerous and if the piano is in a public place you have a duty of care to fill safety castors


there is a website that lists the different types of castors to fit to pianos not sure if I can post links to sites but if you type in Google

"What Type of castor do we need for our piano"

you should find it

Barrie
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting rid of a piano. endymion UK diy 142 August 27th 08 10:58 PM
Piano bracelet Glen Woodworking Plans and Photos 8 November 24th 07 04:59 PM
Ladder standoff, wheels or no wheels? Josey UK diy 10 September 2nd 04 11:05 AM
Old Piano. wanderer UK diy 42 August 24th 04 10:38 PM
DIY piano moving Niel A. Farrow UK diy 26 September 6th 03 12:28 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.