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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

2 Radiators in series?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 6th 10, 09:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default 2 Radiators in series?

I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
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  #2  
Old August 6th 10, 10:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,285
Default 2 Radiators in series?

In article , PeterC
writes
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


No bigee, just treat them as one when balancing ie maintain the drop
across the pair rather than each in turn. Technically you will get a
better result if you join both top and bottom with pipes but I don't
have figures on the difference (I'd expect it to be small).
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's ********
  #3  
Old August 7th 10, 01:32 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,532
Default 2 Radiators in series?

On Aug 6, 9:39*pm, PeterC wrote:
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


No. If carried to extreme, eg having all the house's rads in series,
the last rad gets lukewarm water and has to be correspondingly huge.


NT
  #4  
Old August 7th 10, 02:33 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 689
Default 2 Radiators in series?


"PeterC" wrote in message
...
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to
get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway


One drawback is that if one rad develops a fault you will not be able to
isolate it, and moving the rads as a pair might be fiddly and require care
not to get black goo everywhere if you have to loosen the joiner pipe.
Minor details but worth thinking about if you have nice carpets. [ Yes
folks, I'm stingy, and prefer to empty one rad at a time if I can, rather
than keep forking out for expensive inhibitors etc after draining the whole
system.]

S


  #5  
Old August 7th 10, 02:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,824
Default 2 Radiators in series?

On Sat, 7 Aug 2010 02:33:15 +0100, Spamlet wrote:

"PeterC" wrote in message
...
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to
get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway


One drawback is that if one rad develops a fault you will not be able to
isolate it, and moving the rads as a pair might be fiddly and require care
not to get black goo everywhere if you have to loosen the joiner pipe.
Minor details but worth thinking about if you have nice carpets. [ Yes
folks, I'm stingy, and prefer to empty one rad at a time if I can, rather
than keep forking out for expensive inhibitors etc after draining the whole
system.]

S


Thanks for the replies - I'll pipe them in series.

Good point, Spamlet, I've changed the compression tails to in-line valves.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #6  
Old August 7th 10, 02:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 339
Default 2 Radiators in series?


"PeterC" wrote in message
...
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to
get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


If the radiators are largish, I would avoid putting 2 in series. The second
one would be cooler and less efficient. I also can't see how you could fit
thermastic valves which would work for both rooms.

If you were hell beint on fitting them both in series I would consider
fitting a top pipe as well. Then both rads would have similar top to bottom
temperature gradients.

You ought be able to get right angle lockshield valves within 10cm.


  #7  
Old August 7th 10, 03:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,285
Default 2 Radiators in series?

In article , Fredxx
writes

"PeterC" wrote in message
.. .
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to
get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


If the radiators are largish, I would avoid putting 2 in series. The second
one would be cooler and less efficient. I also can't see how you could fit
thermastic valves which would work for both rooms.

Two 2m radiators in series with pipes joined top and bottom are no less
efficient than a single 4m radiator when the temperature drop across the
pair is the same as the drop across the single long one.
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's ********
  #8  
Old August 7th 10, 04:02 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 307
Default 2 Radiators in series?

PeterC wrote:

Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


I have three towel rails connected in series in my bathroom. I just
treat them as one big radiator. Works fine.

Pete
  #9  
Old August 8th 10, 08:30 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,824
Default 2 Radiators in series?

On Sat, 7 Aug 2010 14:36:40 +0100, Fredxx wrote:

"PeterC" wrote in message
...
I'm adding another radiator to a room; it'll be on the outside wall the
same as the present one. The gap will be only about 10cm or so, room to
get
valves in.
Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


If the radiators are largish, I would avoid putting 2 in series. The second
one would be cooler and less efficient. I also can't see how you could fit
thermastic valves which would work for both rooms.

They're 1200mm and within 10cm of each other in the same room. No TRVs as
they'd argue with the 'stat.

If you were hell beint on fitting them both in series I would consider
fitting a top pipe as well. Then both rads would have similar top to bottom
temperature gradients.

That's easy to do as a retrofit.

You ought be able to get right angle lockshield valves within 10cm.



--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #10  
Old August 8th 10, 08:34 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,824
Default 2 Radiators in series?

On Sat, 07 Aug 2010 16:02:59 +0100, Pete Verdon wrote:

PeterC wrote:

Instead of fitting valves to both rads., I was wondering about just
connecting them in series with a bit of pipe. Is there any major drawback
to this method?


I have three towel rails connected in series in my bathroom. I just
treat them as one big radiator. Works fine.

Pete


I've done the same sort of thing: needed a 2m single, curver rad. for a
bay. It would have been expensive and several weeks to arrive. Use 3-off
600x500 in series and yes, there was drop across them but that's what rads.
are for! The drop was about the same as a 1600mm in the same room.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
 




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