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Painting asbestos soffits



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 17th 10, 04:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 104
Default Painting asbestos soffits

My house was reroofed 40 odd years ago and has asbestos soffits. They
have been painted with the pink masonry paint as used on the walls.
They have a tendency to flake over time (? masonry paint not
appropriate), but not everywhere.

I am currently painting the fascia, and am wondering whether it would
be better to:

1. Paint with masonry paint again over the existing paint after
scraping off the flaky bits.

2. Paint with masonry paint after sanding off all the old masonry
paint off first (yes, I know, very carefully, with full protection)
and ? using stabilising solution.

3. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
over the existing masonry paint after scraping off the flaky bits.

4. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
after sanding off the old masonry paint off first and ? using
stabilising solution.

All thoughts gratefully received.

Keith
Ads
  #2  
Old July 17th 10, 05:54 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,017
Default Painting asbestos soffits

Keefiedee wrote:
My house was reroofed 40 odd years ago and has asbestos soffits. They
have been painted with the pink masonry paint as used on the walls.
They have a tendency to flake over time (? masonry paint not
appropriate), but not everywhere.

I am currently painting the fascia, and am wondering whether it would
be better to:

1. Paint with masonry paint again over the existing paint after
scraping off the flaky bits.

2. Paint with masonry paint after sanding off all the old masonry
paint off first (yes, I know, very carefully, with full protection)
and ? using stabilising solution.

3. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
over the existing masonry paint after scraping off the flaky bits.

4. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
after sanding off the old masonry paint off first and ? using
stabilising solution.

All thoughts gratefully received.

Keith


Soffits have a tendency to peel no matter which paint you use, although I'm
not sure why as they always seem to me to be the most protected part - they
usually start to peel before the fascias for some reason.....I had a theory
that it could have possibly been the heat radiating out from the walls on
hot days and rising up to the eaves, but having just finished painting a
hipped semi with 3 sides of soffits, 1 North facing, 1 West and 1 South, and
they had all peeled in fairly equal proportions, so that theory has gone out
of the window.


Personally I'd go for undercoat and gloss, and try and do them every 5 years
or so

--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008


  #3  
Old July 17th 10, 06:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,216
Default Painting asbestos soffits

On 17 July, 16:54, "Phil L" wrote:
Keefiedee wrote:
My house was reroofed 40 odd years ago and has asbestos soffits. *They
have been painted with the pink masonry paint as used on the walls.
They have a tendency to flake over time (? masonry paint not
appropriate), but not everywhere.


I am currently painting the fascia, and am wondering whether it would
be better to:


1. Paint with masonry paint again over the existing paint after
scraping off the flaky bits.


2. Paint with masonry paint after sanding off all the old masonry
paint off first (yes, I know, very carefully, with full protection)
and ? using stabilising solution.


3. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
over the existing masonry paint after scraping off the flaky bits.


4. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
after sanding off the old masonry paint off first and ? using
stabilising solution.


All thoughts gratefully received.


Keith


Soffits have a tendency to peel no matter which paint you use, although I'm
not sure why as they always seem to me to be the most protected part - they
usually start to peel before the fascias for some reason.....I had a theory
that it could have possibly been the heat radiating out from the walls on
hot days and rising up to the eaves, but having just finished painting a
hipped semi with 3 sides of soffits, 1 North facing, 1 West and 1 South, and
they had all peeled in fairly equal proportions, so that theory has gone out
of the window.

Personally I'd go for undercoat and gloss, and try and do them every 5 years
or so

--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


The raeson it flakes is water vapour penetration from the side you
can't paint. If both sides were painted to problem would be solved.
(Assuming it was dry when you painted) The accumulations of moisture
behind the paint forces it off.
The answer is to paint with one of these vapour micro-porous paints.
If you are bent on scraping it, wear a mask and don't take the
asbestos cement dust in the house. Ideally wear disposable overalls
and head covering.
  #4  
Old July 17th 10, 07:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,685
Default Painting asbestos soffits

I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)

Soffit boards are often black with mould around house vents, I suspect
humid air exiting the house and condensing on their surface.

Conventional undercoat & gloss tend to act like a plastic bag if one
side is porous to moisture, they will bubble & flake.

You basically want a white stain which is highly permeable. Prehaps
Sikkens onol undercoat on its own would do, it is white, MVP,
overcoatable. I would not use the top-coats because whilst they are
overcoatable every 5-12yrs (depending on which one) after about 4
overcoats you need to restore to original surface. They do "wear" by
chalking rather than flaking. That is probably so far into the future
it does not matter, but you want a paint that can breathe because
soffit boards do suffer moisture loading from the other side.
  #5  
Old July 17th 10, 08:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 101
Default Painting asbestos soffits

On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 19:00:45 +0200, js.b1 wrote:

I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)

snip


What is 'wet sheet removal'?


--
rbel
  #6  
Old July 17th 10, 08:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,574
Default Painting asbestos soffits

On Jul 17, 3:39*pm, Keefiedee wrote:
My house was reroofed 40 odd years ago and has asbestos soffits. *They
have been painted with the pink masonry paint as used on the walls.
They have a tendency to flake over time (? masonry paint not
appropriate), but not everywhere.

I am currently painting the fascia, and am wondering whether it would
be better to:

1. Paint with masonry paint again over the existing paint after
scraping off the flaky bits.

2. Paint with masonry paint after sanding off all the old masonry
paint off first (yes, I know, very carefully, with full protection)
and ? using stabilising solution.

3. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
over the existing masonry paint after scraping off the flaky bits.

4. Paint over the masonry paint with white primer, undercoat and gloss
after sanding off the old masonry paint off first and ? using
stabilising solution.

All thoughts gratefully received.

Keith


Once its all off, no need to paint ever again


NT
  #7  
Old July 17th 10, 09:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,017
Default Painting asbestos soffits

rbel wrote:
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 19:00:45 +0200, js.b1 wrote:

I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)

snip


What is 'wet sheet removal'?


removing sheets of it when it's wet, in that it can't dust up because it's
wet.

That said it's mostly a load of ********, a few people died of lung cancer
after working in asbestos factories for 50 years but many more didn't,
nowadays no one will go within 50 yards of it unless they're wearing a
radiation suit, breathing apparatus and 11 pairs of gloves

--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008


  #8  
Old July 18th 10, 12:13 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,574
Default Painting asbestos soffits

On Jul 17, 8:24*pm, "Phil L" wrote:
rbel wrote:
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 19:00:45 +0200, js.b1 wrote:


I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)


snip


What is 'wet sheet removal'?


removing sheets of it when it's wet, in that it can't dust up because it's
wet.

That said it's mostly a load of ********, a few people died of lung cancer
after working in asbestos factories for 50 years but many more didn't,
nowadays no one will go within 50 yards of it unless they're wearing a
radiation suit, breathing apparatus and 11 pairs of gloves


an enormous toll of people have died from it sadly, and continue to.
But the paranoia over DIY asbestos removal is out of all proportion to
the miniscule risk, the level of exposure from one rigidly
encapsulated asbestos sheets removal per decade is very far removed
from that from working in an asbestos factory for a lifetime with no
safe practices or respiratory protection.


NT
  #9  
Old July 18th 10, 12:23 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,600
Default Painting asbestos soffits

NT wrote:
On Jul 17, 8:24 pm, "Phil L" wrote:
rbel wrote:
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 19:00:45 +0200, js.b1 wrote:
I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)
snip
What is 'wet sheet removal'?

removing sheets of it when it's wet, in that it can't dust up because it's
wet.

That said it's mostly a load of ********, a few people died of lung cancer
after working in asbestos factories for 50 years but many more didn't,
nowadays no one will go within 50 yards of it unless they're wearing a
radiation suit, breathing apparatus and 11 pairs of gloves


an enormous toll of people have died from it sadly,


really? In mines and factories and a few other individuals exposed to
e.g. a lot of brake dust.

I cant think of a single case of someone who has been exposed
domestically, dying.

I would be interested to see ANY references..

Ah. a mere google away

http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/cau...osis/index.htm

hardly am enormous toll of people.


and continue to.

barely. teh peak is certainly passed.

Note also less than 4% of detahs associated with asbestos. How odd, that
all those women living in those absestos loaded homes, haven't died of itl.

Could it be, ahem, that the deaths are only from tehiose who are
continually and heavily exposed to it in mines, factories and industrial
environments?

Surely not. Its such a wicked evil substance merely looking at it can
kill you.


But the paranoia over DIY asbestos removal is out of all proportion to
the miniscule risk, the level of exposure from one rigidly
encapsulated asbestos sheets removal per decade is very far removed
from that from working in an asbestos factory for a lifetime with no
safe practices or respiratory protection.



At last, the truth.

NT

  #10  
Old July 18th 10, 12:32 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,574
Default Painting asbestos soffits

On Jul 17, 11:23*pm, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:
NT wrote:
On Jul 17, 8:24 pm, "Phil L" wrote:
rbel wrote:
On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 19:00:45 +0200, js.b1 wrote:
I can not see why anyone would want to scrape/sand the surface of
Chrysotile asbestos fibre soffit cement board - it is perfectly safe
stuff in terms of wet sheet removal, but not so safe when treated in
such an abrasive manner :-)
snip
What is 'wet sheet removal'?
removing sheets of it when it's wet, in that it can't dust up because it's
wet.


That said it's mostly a load of ********, a few people died of lung cancer
after working in asbestos factories for 50 years but many more didn't,
nowadays no one will go within 50 yards of it unless they're wearing a
radiation suit, breathing apparatus and 11 pairs of gloves


an enormous toll of people have died from it sadly,


really? In mines and factories and a few other individuals exposed to
e.g. a lot of brake dust.

I cant think of a single case of someone who has been exposed
domestically, dying.

I would be interested to see ANY references..

Ah. *a mere google away

http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/cau...osis/index.htm

hardly am enormous toll of people.


that page only addresses the word of the use asbestosis on death
certs, and most asbestos related deaths dont use that word, only
300-400 per year for certs saying 'asbestosis' A related page on the
site says "There were 2156 mesothelioma deaths in 2007."


and continue to.

barely. teh peak is certainly passed.


their graph suggests otherwise

Note also less than 4% of detahs associated with asbestos. How odd, that
all those women living in those absestos loaded homes, haven't died of itl.

Could it be, ahem, that the deaths are only from tehiose who are
continually and heavily exposed to it in mines, factories and industrial
environments?


of course


Surely not. Its such a wicked evil substance merely looking at it can
kill you.

But the paranoia over DIY asbestos removal is out of all proportion to
the miniscule risk, the level of exposure from one rigidly
encapsulated asbestos sheets removal per decade is very far removed
from that from working in an asbestos factory for a lifetime with no
safe practices or respiratory protection.


At last, the truth.

NT

 




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