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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Sarking Felt



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 14th 10, 11:08 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Sarking Felt

I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I am left
with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


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  #2  
Old July 15th 10, 08:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,216
Default Sarking Felt

On 14 July, 23:08, "John" wrote:
I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I am left
with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


It should have been fixed before the tiles were put on. There's not a
lot can be done now. If a tile cracks, water will come in the house.
  #3  
Old July 15th 10, 08:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 210
Default Sarking Felt

On 14 July, 23:08, "John" wrote:
how can I minimise any problems?


Call them back to finish the job off properly!
  #4  
Old July 15th 10, 09:21 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,362
Default Sarking Felt

harry
wibbled on Thursday 15 July 2010 08:12

On 14 July, 23:08, "John" wrote:
I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I am
left with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


It should have been fixed before the tiles were put on. There's not a
lot can be done now. If a tile cracks, water will come in the house.


There must be a retro repair method surely?

I have a couple of holes in my felt (wasps and old vent pipe).

There's no way I'm taking tiles and battens off to "fix" this.

I know the basic method is to tuck some felt over the botton side of the
hole felt (ie between felt and tiles) and then teh top of teh repair section
goes under the felt at the top end of the hole.

That will divert some water should there be a leak.

Not sure what to do with the sides as the felt is damaged reight back to the
rafters. Foam it in perhaps?

--
Tim Watts

Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.

  #5  
Old July 15th 10, 10:23 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 60
Default Sarking Felt

On 15/07/2010 08:12, harry wrote:
On 14 July, 23:08, wrote:
I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I am left
with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


It should have been fixed before the tiles were put on. There's not a
lot can be done now. If a tile cracks, water will come in the house.


I thought in such a case it would be preferable to fix the tile?

I've never fully understood sarking felt. Looks like some sort of ease
of constructing a roof expedient to me. If I was the OP I'd leave it and
be happy for the ventilation.

Rob
  #6  
Old July 15th 10, 10:29 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 639
Default Sarking Felt

On 15/07/10 10:23, Rob wrote:
On 15/07/2010 08:12, harry wrote:
On 14 July, 23:08, wrote:
I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I
am left
with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


It should have been fixed before the tiles were put on. There's not a
lot can be done now. If a tile cracks, water will come in the house.


I thought in such a case it would be preferable to fix the tile?

I've never fully understood sarking felt. Looks like some sort of ease
of constructing a roof expedient to me. If I was the OP I'd leave it and
be happy for the ventilation.

Rob

I think the main use of felt is to stop rain getting in when the
tiles/slates are off, and to stop draughts lifting off the slates/tiles.

But this never happened to my roof when I had no felt.

Felt means theres much less ventilation up there,
so more chance of condensation and woodrot.

But i'm a worrier with little experience.

When did they start felting roofs?
Have people had condensation problems?

There were reports here of condensation in the last very cold winter,
has the moisture cleared from people's attics over the last few warmer
months?

[g]
  #7  
Old July 15th 10, 10:54 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,685
Default Sarking Felt

Eh?

Sarking felt is a very beneficial development.
Realise a lost slate means you are getting water ingress from that
point to the ridge, not just that "small hole".
The problem with sarking felt is that it pools & rots at the bottom,
so eaves protectors are a good addition along with replacing the bit
of felt at the bottom.

Slate roof.
Slate fixings do fail eventually, if you lose a slate, the sarking
felt catches the rain and directs it into the gutter.

Marley single or double camber tiles.
The camber provides ventilation & wind driven rain ingress, the rain
runs down the sarking felt accordingly. They are really not a
brilliant roof tile yet were commonly used on a 22-degree roof with
sarking felt & close boarding (Scottish style).

Interlocking tiles.
Great in that water ingress is much reduced, good for very low angles
without close boarding.


Whoever did the chimney removal should have cut a piece of sarking
felt & overlapped correctly.

Did they vent the chimney stack if part of the wall is outside facing?
You do not want to vented into the loft & house, because it will
transfer moist air into the loft. You want an airbrick vent at the
top, at the bottom likewise or an internal vent. It does not need to
be big, but realise water will penetrate single brick and the chimney
can get running in water. Any joists tha abutt it will get rot in
their ends eventually, it can cause blown plaster issues.


Need Kipper At Sea to give a full answer, think he has retired.
  #8  
Old July 15th 10, 11:38 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 639
Default Sarking Felt

On 15/07/10 10:54, js.b1 wrote:
Eh?

Sarking felt is a very beneficial development.
Realise a lost slate means you are getting water ingress from that
point to the ridge, not just that "small hole".


But without felt I will notice the roof leak
when I'm checking the attic and see light or water
or when i see dampness on the ceiling
But with felt the leak could be undetected for years,
rotting the timbers down below.

And felt cuts ventilation drastically.

[g]

  #9  
Old July 15th 10, 11:47 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 387
Default Sarking Felt


"george [dicegeorge]" wrote in message
...
On 15/07/10 10:23, Rob wrote:

snip
When did they start felting roofs?
Have people had condensation problems?

snip

I don't know when they started, but...

My 1896 house in rural Derbyshire didn't have felt (original slate roof, I
believe).
My 1930s house in Suffolk did have felt (again original tile roof, I think).

--
No plan survives contact with the enemy.

Helmuth von Moltke the Elder

  #10  
Old July 15th 10, 06:14 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,761
Default Sarking Felt

In article ,
Tim Watts writes:
harry
wibbled on Thursday 15 July 2010 08:12

On 14 July, 23:08, "John" wrote:
I have had a flue relocated and the tiles have been replaced - but I am
left with a ragged hole in the sarking felt.

Does it matter - if so, how can I minimise any problems?


It should have been fixed before the tiles were put on. There's not a
lot can be done now. If a tile cracks, water will come in the house.


There must be a retro repair method surely?

I have a couple of holes in my felt (wasps and old vent pipe).

There's no way I'm taking tiles and battens off to "fix" this.

I know the basic method is to tuck some felt over the botton side of the
hole felt (ie between felt and tiles) and then teh top of teh repair section
goes under the felt at the top end of the hole.

That will divert some water should there be a leak.

Not sure what to do with the sides as the felt is damaged reight back to the
rafters. Foam it in perhaps?


There's usually a slight sag on the felt between the rafters, and
this causes the water to run down the middle between rafters, which
is why you don't have to worry about the batten nail holes through
the felt into the rafters.

To be honest, I wouldn't bother repairing at this point. You could
do it if/when a leak happens.

Having said that, when I replaced part of my roof (a valley gutter),
I properly removed the battens and fitted new felt under the old,
but that's why I DIY - so I get a job done properly.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
 




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