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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

copying wooden mouldings



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 13th 10, 01:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 79
Default copying wooden mouldings

I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.

I've considered getting a router or maybe a spindle moulder, but don't
know much about these. I've presumed that a router is a small hand
held version of a spindle moulder, though you can get benches to
attach your router to to get greater precision.

How though do you go about getting the shape you need right.
Presumably cutter profiles from Victorian times are not still
available. The fluting on some of my mouldings is quite complex. Do
you need to make several passes with different cutters, and try and
make it match the old shape?

I saw in one thread about making your own cutters. How is this done?
Is it a DIY proposition?
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  #2  
Old May 13th 10, 01:40 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,162
Default copying wooden mouldings

On 13 May, 12:21, andyv wrote:
I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need.


Have them made for you on a spindle moulder. You can't make your own
without a lot of workshop space and a large and fairly expensive
machine. You won't do Victorian mouldings on a router or router table.

For some smaller mouldings, especially detail work, you can make them
at home using a wooden moulding plane, but again not a router.
  #3  
Old May 13th 10, 03:10 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,367
Default copying wooden mouldings

On 13 May, 12:21, andyv wrote:
I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.

I've considered getting a router or maybe a spindle moulder, but don't
know much about these. I've presumed that a router is a small hand
held version of a spindle moulder, though you can get benches to
attach your router to to get greater precision.

How though do you go about getting the shape you need right.
Presumably cutter profiles from Victorian times are not still
available. *The fluting on some of my mouldings is quite complex. Do
you need to make several passes with different cutters, and try and
make it match the old shape?

I saw in one thread about making your own cutters. How is this done?
Is it a DIY proposition?


A spindle moulder is a large, heavy and expensive machine - with a
reputation for snatching fingers from the inexperienced or careless.

You might pay someone to run you some custom mouldings for you on a
spindle moulder, it's not a realistic proposition to consider one of
your own for a domestic project.

However running your own mouldings with a router mounted on a table,
is very doable.

If the moulding is unusual you will need several passes and some
ingenuity to produce it. Particularly after the initial cut on a
rectangular section timber, there's likely to be a need to support the
moulding in different ways on subsequent passes.

If you have no experience of routers, expect to spend some time
mastering it in order to get good results.

Have a look through the cutters offered by Trend and through Axminster
to see if there's something suitable. But also take a sample of your
required moulding to a larger timber merchant - you might be lucky, or
find something not-too-far-off that can be adapted.

If you look at Axminster (.co.uk) you'll also see what a spindle looks
like and costs, and that cutters are fairly cheap with a very
extensive range. That's the deal - a very expensive and very powerful
machine that can rapidly cut deep and complex mouldings - but cutters
are cheap.
  #4  
Old May 13th 10, 03:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,133
Default copying wooden mouldings

On May 13, 2:10*pm, " wrote:
On 13 May, 12:21, andyv wrote:





I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.



We had spindels and some handrails copied by a local joinery and the
result was first rate. I agree with others that these people have
expensive machiens and a lot of experience so it's good to let them do
it.

For skirting and architrave take a look on eBay. We found various
original bits of wood being sold there.

Robert
  #5  
Old May 13th 10, 03:58 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 545
Default copying wooden mouldings


"andyv" wrote in message
...
I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.

I've considered getting a router or maybe a spindle moulder, but don't
know much about these. I've presumed that a router is a small hand
held version of a spindle moulder, though you can get benches to
attach your router to to get greater precision.

How though do you go about getting the shape you need right.
Presumably cutter profiles from Victorian times are not still
available. The fluting on some of my mouldings is quite complex. Do
you need to make several passes with different cutters, and try and
make it match the old shape?

I saw in one thread about making your own cutters. How is this done?
Is it a DIY proposition?




Custom cutters for spindle moulders can be made by such places as:
http://www.norfolksawservices.co.uk/

mark


  #6  
Old May 13th 10, 04:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,574
Default copying wooden mouldings

On May 13, 12:21*pm, andyv wrote:
I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.

I've considered getting a router or maybe a spindle moulder, but don't
know much about these. I've presumed that a router is a small hand
held version of a spindle moulder, though you can get benches to
attach your router to to get greater precision.

How though do you go about getting the shape you need right.
Presumably cutter profiles from Victorian times are not still
available. *The fluting on some of my mouldings is quite complex. Do
you need to make several passes with different cutters, and try and
make it match the old shape?

I saw in one thread about making your own cutters. How is this done?
Is it a DIY proposition?



Wot they said. The only thing to add is that some old mouldings can be
made by simply gluing 2 or 3 modern simple mouldings together.


NT
  #7  
Old May 13th 10, 04:42 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,162
Default copying wooden mouldings

On 13 May, 14:10, " wrote:

However running your own mouldings with a router mounted on a table,
is very doable.


Not for skirtings. The size of the individual curves is too big for a
router cutter.
  #8  
Old May 13th 10, 04:46 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,367
Default copying wooden mouldings


Custom cutters for spindle moulders can be made by such places as:http://www.norfolksawservices.co.uk/


I've had old handsaws resharpened by them (they might have done my
planer blades too - can't remember) - tiptop service at a very
reasonable price.
  #9  
Old May 13th 10, 04:56 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,367
Default copying wooden mouldings

On 13 May, 15:42, Andy Dingley wrote:
On 13 May, 14:10, " wrote:

However running your own mouldings with a router mounted on a table,
is very doable.


Not for skirtings. The size of the individual curves is too big for a
router cutter.


You're right to say a complex moulding in one pass on a router table
is more than they're capable of.

But a combination of cutters and cuts can do a lot.

For instance - I've used 25mm radius cutters in my router & table -
two passes & flipping the board over to do half-rounds/nosings on 50mm
thick board for stair treads.

Of course a spindle moulder could have done the whole thing in one
pass, but for modest quantities (and possibly cleaning up
imperfections between the cuts by hand) a lot can be done with routers
and tables.

  #10  
Old May 13th 10, 05:03 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,979
Default copying wooden mouldings

NT wrote:
On May 13, 12:21 pm, andyv wrote:
I know a lot of this has been discussed before but I can't quite sort
out what I need. I have an old Victorian property which has been badly
messed about with lots of non original skirting boards, architraves
and window surrounds. There are however plenty of original bits I can
copy.

I've considered getting a router or maybe a spindle moulder, but don't
know much about these. I've presumed that a router is a small hand
held version of a spindle moulder, though you can get benches to
attach your router to to get greater precision.

How though do you go about getting the shape you need right.
Presumably cutter profiles from Victorian times are not still
available. The fluting on some of my mouldings is quite complex. Do
you need to make several passes with different cutters, and try and
make it match the old shape?

I saw in one thread about making your own cutters. How is this done?
Is it a DIY proposition?



Wot they said. The only thing to add is that some old mouldings can be
made by simply gluing 2 or 3 modern simple mouldings together.


NT


Or, assuming it's going to be painted, mdf for the bulk, and
off-the-shelf mouldings for the fancy bits. A saw bench might be useful.
 




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