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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

The revolution has started!



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 6th 09, 09:50 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,323
Default The revolution has started!

Fitted a (genuine) Yale lock today. Instructions said;

To lubricate, use WD40 or similar!

Oh yes!

In black & white, from the people who invented the cylinder pin-tumbler
lock. Lubricate with WD40!

Oh yes!


--
Dave - WD40 Liberation Front.


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  #2  
Old October 6th 09, 10:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,348
Default The revolution has started!

On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 20:50:10 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Fitted a (genuine) Yale lock today. Instructions said;

To lubricate, use WD40 or similar!

Oh yes!

In black & white, from the people who invented the cylinder pin-tumbler
lock. Lubricate with WD40!


I fitted a new cylinder a few weeks ago.

I was given the same instructions.

I ignored them. I use powdered graphite.



--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

  #3  
Old October 7th 09, 01:03 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,669
Default The revolution has started!

On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 21:54:58 +0100, John Rumm wrote:
Maybe they get to sell more locks that way... ;-)


Git, you beat me to it


  #4  
Old October 7th 09, 12:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 177
Default The revolution has started!

On 6 Oct, 22:07, Bob Eager wrote:
On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 20:50:10 +0000, The Medway Handyman wrote:
Fitted a (genuine) Yale lock today. *Instructions said;


To lubricate, use WD40 or similar!


Oh yes!


In black & white, from the people who invented the cylinder pin-tumbler
lock. *Lubricate with WD40!


I fitted a new cylinder a few weeks ago.

I was given the same instructions.

I ignored them. I use powdered graphite.

--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
*http://www.mirrorservice.org


I was trying to remember what the problem is - it goes sticky doesn't
it ? Maybe that would explain why the sections of my wife's walking
poles ended up as a solid mass.

Rob
  #5  
Old October 7th 09, 02:12 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,404
Default The revolution has started!

On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 04:11:43 -0700 (PDT), Rob G wrote:

I was trying to remember what the problem is - it goes sticky doesn't
it ? Maybe that would explain why the sections of my wife's walking
poles ended up as a solid mass.


Yes, leaves a sticky residue that a part from gummimg things up also
attracts dirt. Dirt that then gets made into a nice grinding paste
with the residue, so yes it's a means of selling more locks.

--
Cheers
Dave.



  #6  
Old October 7th 09, 04:44 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,835
Default The revolution has started!

On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 14:12:48 +0100 (BST), Dave Liquorice wrote:

On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 04:11:43 -0700 (PDT), Rob G wrote:

I was trying to remember what the problem is - it goes sticky doesn't
it ? Maybe that would explain why the sections of my wife's walking
poles ended up as a solid mass.


Yes, leaves a sticky residue that a part from gummimg things up also
attracts dirt. Dirt that then gets made into a nice grinding paste
with the residue, so yes it's a means of selling more locks.


Out of interest, is there a thin spray lube that's OK for switches, locks
etc?
Sometimes oil or grease has gone thick in something realtively inaccessible
(the last pull-switch that I stripped and rebuilt now works freely but
skips sometimes, but 'tis old). Also, a thin film of something is sometimes
better than oil or grease.

BTW, found a good use for WD40: quick spray on blades of hedge clippers,
sickle etc. and rub it in forms a thin film that isn't sticky enough to
hold on to leaves and grass. Now I can start to use it.
--
Peter.
The head of a pin will hold more angels if
it's been flattened with an angel-grinder.
  #7  
Old October 8th 09, 02:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,091
Default The revolution has started!

In article ,
PeterC writes:

BTW, found a good use for WD40: quick spray on blades of hedge clippers,
sickle etc. and rub it in forms a thin film that isn't sticky enough to
hold on to leaves and grass. Now I can start to use it.


It probably makes a good resin solvent. My hedge trimmer says
resin solvent should be sprayed on the blades, but I haven't
gone looking for any yet (and may just use WD40).

However, beware that WD40 will strip off any oil film, leaving
the blades liable to rust in storage. Might want to apply a
spray-on oil after the WD40 has evaporated.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #8  
Old October 8th 09, 05:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 7
Default The revolution has started!

On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 16:44:18 +0100, PeterC
wrote:

On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 14:12:48 +0100 (BST), Dave Liquorice wrote:

On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 04:11:43 -0700 (PDT), Rob G wrote:

I was trying to remember what the problem is - it goes sticky doesn't
it ? Maybe that would explain why the sections of my wife's walking
poles ended up as a solid mass.


Yes, leaves a sticky residue that a part from gummimg things up also
attracts dirt. Dirt that then gets made into a nice grinding paste
with the residue, so yes it's a means of selling more locks.


Out of interest, is there a thin spray lube that's OK for switches, locks
etc?
Sometimes oil or grease has gone thick in something realtively inaccessible
(the last pull-switch that I stripped and rebuilt now works freely but
skips sometimes, but 'tis old). Also, a thin film of something is sometimes
better than oil or grease.

BTW, found a good use for WD40: quick spray on blades of hedge clippers,
sickle etc. and rub it in forms a thin film that isn't sticky enough to
hold on to leaves and grass. Now I can start to use it.

What an earth are you people rambling on about???? (happy smiley
inserted here)

WD40 has been used for years as penetrating AND lubricating

I have been in engineering for 25 years and WD40 has been used all the
time its well known to be used in locks and any small component
devices.
If you look on the site it tells you.
http://www.wd40.co.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1519
  #9  
Old October 8th 09, 05:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,348
Default The revolution has started!

On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 17:06:55 +0100, CarlBriggs wrote:

I have been in engineering for 25 years and WD40 has been used all the
time its well known to be used in locks and any small component devices.


If you look on the site it tells you.
http://www.wd40.co.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1519


MRD.



--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

  #10  
Old October 8th 09, 07:26 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,323
Default The revolution has started!

CarlBriggs wrote:

What an earth are you people rambling on about???? (happy smiley
inserted here)

WD40 has been used for years as penetrating AND lubricating

I have been in engineering for 25 years and WD40 has been used all the
time its well known to be used in locks and any small component
devices.
If you look on the site it tells you.
http://www.wd40.co.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1519


Carl - where have you been? I've been fighting the WD40 corner all alone
for ages. :-)

Together we could form a military wing!


--
Dave - WD40 Liberation Front.


 




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