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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 28th 09, 03:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

Will a clear polyeurethane varnish like Ronseal Diamond Hard bring
down the colour of newly sanded old pine floorboards?

In my last house I used a polyeurethane varnish (I wish I could
remember what, but I left the near-empty tin behind when we moved) on
sanded pine floorboards dating from 1908 (ie, they were nice and old
and seasoned). Obviously, when sanded, the boards had the colour of
new wood, but the varnish took this down to a pleasant golden colour.

I'm now in the latter stages of sanding the pine floorboards in the
hall of my new house, which were laid in 1963. They've come up well
with a belt sander. I want to varnish them with a hardwearing satin or
matt varnish, but would like to achieve the same golden colour as on
the previous occasion. I don't want to use a coloured varnish, or to
stain the wood if I can help it.

Has anyone used one of the modern water-based polyeurethane varnishes,
like Ronseal Diamond Hard, and if so, can you tell me if they affect
the colour of sanded pine floorboards? If not, what kind of varnish
would?

Regards
Richard
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  #2  
Old August 28th 09, 03:45 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

You need the Diamond Hard with the colour tint in it, or you need to
stain prior to varnishing. Clear diamond hard will not change the
colour significantly, nor will any other clear varnish.


  #3  
Old August 28th 09, 04:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 3,574
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

On Aug 28, 3:31*pm, geraldthehamster wrote:
Will a clear polyeurethane varnish like Ronseal Diamond Hard bring
down the colour of newly sanded old pine floorboards?

In my last house I used a polyeurethane varnish (I wish I could
remember what, but I left the near-empty tin behind when we moved) on
sanded pine floorboards dating from 1908 (ie, they were nice and old
and seasoned). Obviously, when sanded, the boards had the colour of
new wood, but the varnish took this down to a pleasant golden colour.

I'm now in the latter stages of sanding the pine floorboards in the
hall of my new house, which were laid in 1963. They've come up well
with a belt sander. I want to varnish them with a hardwearing satin or
matt varnish, but would like to achieve the same golden colour as on
the previous occasion. I don't want to use a coloured varnish, or to
stain the wood if I can help it.

Has anyone used one of the modern water-based polyeurethane varnishes,
like Ronseal Diamond Hard, and if so, can you tell me if they affect
the colour of sanded pine floorboards? If not, what kind of varnish
would?

Regards
Richard


Stay away from tinted varnishes, as the floor wears normally the
varnish chips, and light marks on dark wood look awful.

Stain might get you what you want, but I prefer to leave them pale
initially and let them darken naturally. It doesnt take long to start
looking good, and the result is much better imho


NT
  #4  
Old August 28th 09, 04:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,998
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

In article
,
geraldthehamster wrote:
Has anyone used one of the modern water-based polyeurethane varnishes,
like Ronseal Diamond Hard, and if so, can you tell me if they affect
the colour of sanded pine floorboards? If not, what kind of varnish
would?


I've found the water based ones don't produce that lovely mellow glow on
pine you got with traditional varnish. But are better for woods you don't
want to change the colour of.

--
*No husband has ever been shot while doing the dishes *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #5  
Old August 28th 09, 05:20 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

On Aug 28, 4:36*pm, "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:
In article
,
* *geraldthehamster wrote:

Has anyone used one of the modern water-based polyeurethane varnishes,
like Ronseal Diamond Hard, and if so, can you tell me if they affect
the colour of sanded pine floorboards? If not, what kind of varnish
would?


I've found the water based ones don't produce that lovely mellow glow on
pine you got with traditional varnish. But are better for woods you don't
want to change the colour of.


OK, thanks. So what still available now, that you would class as
"traditional" varnish?

Cheers
Richard

  #6  
Old August 28th 09, 05:41 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

On Aug 28, 3:52*pm, John Rumm wrote:
RubberBiker wrote:
You need the Diamond Hard with the colour tint in it, or you need to
stain prior to varnishing. Clear diamond hard will not change the
colour significantly, nor will any other clear varnish.


IME most clear varnishes will darken the wood slightly. They may or may
not be enough for the effect you seek.


Thanks. I just wish I could remember what I used last time. I'm pretty
sure it was Ronseal, come to think of it. I guess I'll just sad a bit
of gash floorboard from the works upstairs, and experiment.

Cheers
Richard

  #7  
Old August 28th 09, 05:44 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,998
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

In article
,
geraldthehamster wrote:
I've found the water based ones don't produce that lovely mellow glow
on pine you got with traditional varnish. But are better for woods you
don't want to change the colour of.


OK, thanks. So what still available now, that you would class as
"traditional" varnish?


Dunno - look on the tin for brush cleaning instructions. If it needs white
spirit it will be oil based.

--
*I wonder how much deeper the ocean would be without sponges*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #8  
Old August 28th 09, 07:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,998
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

In article
,
RubberBiker wrote:
You need the Diamond Hard with the colour tint in it, or you need to
stain prior to varnishing. Clear diamond hard will not change the
colour significantly, nor will any other clear varnish.


Varnished pine certainly darkens considerably with oil based varnish.
Could be a combination of the varnish and the wood itself changing colour.
Doesn't seem anything like as dramatic with a water based varnish -
perhaps this blocks out light etc in a different way?

--
*Ham and Eggs: Just a day's work for a chicken, but a lifetime commitment

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #9  
Old August 28th 09, 08:16 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

On Aug 28, 7:03*pm, John Rumm wrote:

OK, thanks. So what still available now, that you would class as
"traditional" varnish?


Any of the high VoC content jobbies, and not the quick drying type. (the
latter are not as hard wearing)


What's puzzling is that none of the high VOC varnishes I've seen in
the sheds are billed as floor varnishes - for example:

http://www.wickes.co.uk/Professional...sh/invt/170505

I also have a tin in the cupboard of Ronseal Ultra Tough Satincoat,
also high VOC, which I used on a worktop. The tin suggests uses on all
sorts of furniture, but omits to mention floors.

I'm puzzled that while the sheds continue to sell high VOC solvent
based varnishes, the only ones they have that are explicitly floor
varnishes are medium or low VOC water based varnishes. Makes no sense
to me.

Regards
Richard
  #10  
Old August 28th 09, 08:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Floor varnish changing colour of floorboards

On Aug 28, 7:19*pm, "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:

Varnished pine certainly darkens considerably with oil based varnish.
Could be a combination of the varnish and the wood itself changing colour..
Doesn't seem anything like as dramatic with a water based varnish -
perhaps this blocks out light etc in a different way?


I suppose that makes sense, when you think what happens when you apply
oils to wood - not that I suppose the solvents used in varnishes bear
much relation to linseed oil, teak oil, etc. ;-) and I suppose in
theory the solvent is just a carrier, that evaporates.

Regards
Richard
 




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