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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 28th 09, 08:55 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

I am *still* renovating a Victorian timber barn. When it was used as a
dairy for milking cows hygiene regulations required that the interior
was finished in white. As a consequence there is a generation or two of
flaky white lime attached to the beams.

I horrified the Architect by mentioning grit blasting. He strongly
advocates using a wire brush!

I tried a well worn semi-cup brush at low speed in the ...wait for
it.... angle grinder and was rather disappointed with the result. Soft
patches are still excavated, grain is still raised and there was some
evidence of blackening where I paused for too long.

Is there a best wire wheel type for this job? Presumably radial fine
wire rather than stiff wire cup?

Speed is also at issue. I would be surprised if the grit blaster could
not do the job in a long day (ground floor only 5mx10m) whereas wire
brushing might take a week or two!

The down side to grit blasting is the tendency to strip areas weakened
by woodworm, gouge holes where nails have been removed and leave sand
embedded in the wood which falls out over the next ten years.

Any advice?

regards
--
Tim Lamb
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  #2  
Old April 28th 09, 09:13 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 242
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

AIUI there are now specialist vapour blasting processes for this sort
of problem.

Found this: http://www.softblast.co.uk/timber.html
  #3  
Old April 28th 09, 09:35 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,601
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

Tim Lamb wrote:
I am *still* renovating a Victorian timber barn. When it was used as a
dairy for milking cows hygiene regulations required that the interior
was finished in white. As a consequence there is a generation or two of
flaky white lime attached to the beams.

I horrified the Architect by mentioning grit blasting. He strongly
advocates using a wire brush!

I tried a well worn semi-cup brush at low speed in the ...wait for
it.... angle grinder and was rather disappointed with the result. Soft
patches are still excavated, grain is still raised and there was some
evidence of blackening where I paused for too long.

Is there a best wire wheel type for this job? Presumably radial fine
wire rather than stiff wire cup?

Speed is also at issue. I would be surprised if the grit blaster could
not do the job in a long day (ground floor only 5mx10m) whereas wire
brushing might take a week or two!

The down side to grit blasting is the tendency to strip areas weakened
by woodworm, gouge holes where nails have been removed and leave sand
embedded in the wood which falls out over the next ten years.

Any advice?


Try a GOOD and high power pressure washer


regards

  #4  
Old April 28th 09, 11:19 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 8,640
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

Tim Lamb wrote:
I am *still* renovating a Victorian timber barn. When it was used as a
dairy for milking cows hygiene regulations required that the interior
was finished in white. As a consequence there is a generation or two of
flaky white lime attached to the beams.

I horrified the Architect by mentioning grit blasting. He strongly
advocates using a wire brush!

I tried a well worn semi-cup brush at low speed in the ...wait for
it.... angle grinder and was rather disappointed with the result. Soft
patches are still excavated, grain is still raised and there was some
evidence of blackening where I paused for too long.

Is there a best wire wheel type for this job? Presumably radial fine
wire rather than stiff wire cup?

Speed is also at issue. I would be surprised if the grit blaster could
not do the job in a long day (ground floor only 5mx10m) whereas wire
brushing might take a week or two!

The down side to grit blasting is the tendency to strip areas weakened
by woodworm, gouge holes where nails have been removed and leave sand
embedded in the wood which falls out over the next ten years.

Any advice?

regards


A wire brush in a drill would be more appropriate. A nylon brush in a
drill might be even better. You can also get nylon mesh wheels for use
in a drill.
Grit blasting does a lot of damage, its really not suitable
I'd be very tempted by the pressure washer suggestion, no experience
of that though


NT
  #5  
Old April 28th 09, 12:44 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,146
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

On 28 Apr, 08:55, Tim Lamb wrote:

I horrified the Architect by mentioning grit blasting. He strongly
advocates using a wire brush!


Neither are much good - they both have a cutting rate that depends on
material hardness, but doesn't care much about surface depth. They'll
both accentuate any texture or rot that's present.

I'd actually suggest (bizarre though it sounds) a belt sander with a
wide platen. This will tend to flatten variations, not highlight it.
Of course the risk with these is that they're horribly sensitive to
operator error and they'll dig in like crazy if you tilt forwards away
from the platen and onto the roller. They're a lot better if you use
them with a "sanding frame" attached around them, which stops this
tipping.

Makita used to do a gadget that was a 6" wide flap brush, with
swappable brushes from sandpaper shreds to wire. These were good for
cleaing beams, so long as you didn't press too hard and the beams were
reasonably consistent. Using the tips of the bristles gave a flat
finish, pushing hard gave the hardness-dependent behaviour of a small
brush. Cost hundreds though, I used to hire mine. Think Axminster used
to stock them.
  #6  
Old April 28th 09, 03:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 15,344
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

Andy Dingley wrote:

Makita used to do a gadget that was a 6" wide flap brush, with
swappable brushes from sandpaper shreds to wire. These were good for
cleaing beams, so long as you didn't press too hard and the beams were
reasonably consistent. Using the tips of the bristles gave a flat


Yup, I have seen these used quite effectively... something like:

http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/...0Sanders#92632


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
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| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #7  
Old April 28th 09, 05:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 62
Default Lime wash on beams or ping Anna Kettle:-)

Hi Tim

Hi Tim

Whenever I have had to clean off flaky lime, I have been getting ready
to relimewash. Is that an option in your case? Or could you go for the
'limed oak' effect? Because if so you dont need to get every last bit
of lime off, just the loose bits and a stiff brush works just fine to
do that

Otherwise ...

As TNP suggests, If you have a pressure washer and dont mind the barn
getting wet then I'd be tempted to experiment with a pressure washer
in an inconspicuous spot

or

As rubber biker says, there are various air abrasive systems and that
is what the pros would use. Joss and Doff (sp?) are names that come
to mind. I have never used them but those who have done say they are
effective but there is a technique to using them. Presumably the hire
people would tell you how

I dont like the sanding ideas. Sanding removes the surface of the
timber and hence the patination and reveals woodworm holes which are
not very pretty

I dont like the wire brush idea either, too much like hard work and
will tend to abrade the surface rather than remove recessed limewash.
But if you do use a wire brush then make sure it is brass not steel or
you will be left with a fine scattering of rust on the timbers

Anna
 




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