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Tiling on particle board



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 26th 09, 12:41 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 107
Default Tiling on particle board

We are planning to replace the tiling on the bathroom floor in our
house. The particle board floor has already suffered a bit of water
damage in one spot (this I have attended to with a two-pot epoxy sealer,
which has soaked right in and made that patch very strong) therefore I
intend to make sure that the whole surface is properly prepared before
laying the new tiles. I could use the two-pot treatment, but it would
turn out quite expensive. I'd be grateful for suggestions about the
most suitable type of product to use for this purpose. Thanks.
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  #2  
Old April 26th 09, 12:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,983
Default Tiling on particle board

On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 10:41:59 +1200, Gib Bogle wrote:

We are planning to replace the tiling on the bathroom floor in our
house. The particle board floor has already suffered a bit of water
damage in one spot (this I have attended to with a two-pot epoxy sealer,
which has soaked right in and made that patch very strong) therefore I
intend to make sure that the whole surface is properly prepared before
laying the new tiles. I could use the two-pot treatment, but it would
turn out quite expensive. I'd be grateful for suggestions about the
most suitable type of product to use for this purpose. Thanks.


Ha'porth of tar :-)

Unless you're just slapping down some cheap tiles to tart up and sell the
place I'd really, *really* rip up the chipboard and put down at least WBP
ply to tile onto. Water *will* get past your tiles (or more to the point,
grout) and the chipboard *will* swell up and probably bugger up the tiling.

--
John Stumbles

Women always generalise
  #3  
Old April 26th 09, 01:02 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 357
Default Tiling on particle board

John Stumbles wrote:

Unless you're just slapping down some cheap tiles to tart up and sell the
place I'd really, *really* rip up the chipboard and put down at least WBP
ply to tile onto. Water *will* get past your tiles (or more to the point,
grout) and the chipboard *will* swell up and probably bugger up the tiling.


Granted tiling directly onto chipboard doesn't sound too clever, but
could one not apply a suitable membrane (either just waterproof, or
something clever like Ditra) or boards (Marmox etc)?

Pete

  #4  
Old April 26th 09, 01:04 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 107
Default Tiling on particle board

John Stumbles wrote:
On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 10:41:59 +1200, Gib Bogle wrote:

We are planning to replace the tiling on the bathroom floor in our
house. The particle board floor has already suffered a bit of water
damage in one spot (this I have attended to with a two-pot epoxy sealer,
which has soaked right in and made that patch very strong) therefore I
intend to make sure that the whole surface is properly prepared before
laying the new tiles. I could use the two-pot treatment, but it would
turn out quite expensive. I'd be grateful for suggestions about the
most suitable type of product to use for this purpose. Thanks.


Ha'porth of tar :-)

Unless you're just slapping down some cheap tiles to tart up and sell the
place I'd really, *really* rip up the chipboard and put down at least WBP
ply to tile onto. Water *will* get past your tiles (or more to the point,
grout) and the chipboard *will* swell up and probably bugger up the tiling.


"Will", but when? This tile has been down for 35 years, and the damage
to the untreated chipboard is slight. I'm guessing that with a
waterproof treatment the floor will last a lot longer. Although it's
not cheap, using the sealer I referred to would cost much less than
replacing the flooring. This "Penetrating Epoxy Primer" is claimed "to
penetrate and saturate the timber" and to have "waterproofing qualities
suitable for marine use".
  #5  
Old April 26th 09, 11:37 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,783
Default Tiling on particle board

Gib Bogle wrote:
John Stumbles wrote:
On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 10:41:59 +1200, Gib Bogle wrote:

We are planning to replace the tiling on the bathroom floor in our
house. The particle board floor has already suffered a bit of water
damage in one spot (this I have attended to with a two-pot epoxy
sealer, which has soaked right in and made that patch very strong)
therefore I intend to make sure that the whole surface is properly
prepared before laying the new tiles. I could use the two-pot
treatment, but it would turn out quite expensive. I'd be grateful
for suggestions about the most suitable type of product to use for
this purpose. Thanks.


Ha'porth of tar :-)

Unless you're just slapping down some cheap tiles to tart up and sell the
place I'd really, *really* rip up the chipboard and put down at least WBP
ply to tile onto. Water *will* get past your tiles (or more to the point,
grout) and the chipboard *will* swell up and probably bugger up the
tiling.


"Will", but when? This tile has been down for 35 years, and the damage
to the untreated chipboard is slight. I'm guessing that with a
waterproof treatment the floor will last a lot longer. Although it's
not cheap, using the sealer I referred to would cost much less than
replacing the flooring. This "Penetrating Epoxy Primer" is claimed "to
penetrate and saturate the timber" and to have "waterproofing qualities
suitable for marine use".


Justs retile.

Tiles are waterproof.

Grout is not COMPLETELY water proof, it its in a puddle, water will
eventually seep through.

If it does you have bigger problems than soggy chip tho.
  #6  
Old April 26th 09, 12:12 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5,028
Default Tiling on particle board

Pete Verdon wrote:
John Stumbles wrote:

Unless you're just slapping down some cheap tiles to tart up and sell the
place I'd really, *really* rip up the chipboard and put down at least WBP
ply to tile onto. Water *will* get past your tiles (or more to the point,
grout) and the chipboard *will* swell up and probably bugger up the
tiling.


Granted tiling directly onto chipboard doesn't sound too clever, but
could one not apply a suitable membrane (either just waterproof, or
something clever like Ditra) or boards (Marmox etc)?

Pete


Anything that raises the level of the floor gives you problems at
doorways, wc bowls etc.
I'd go with the sealer. Polyester is cheap and probably waterproof
enough for this application.
  #7  
Old April 26th 09, 02:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 43
Default Tiling on particle board


"Gib Bogle" wrote in message
...
We are planning to replace the tiling on the bathroom floor in our house.
The particle board floor has already suffered a bit of water damage in one
spot (this I have attended to with a two-pot epoxy sealer, which has
soaked right in and made that patch very strong) therefore I intend to
make sure that the whole surface is properly prepared before laying the
new tiles. I could use the two-pot treatment, but it would turn out quite
expensive. I'd be grateful for suggestions about the most suitable type
of product to use for this purpose. Thanks.


One advertised solution is something that sounds/spells like "no more ply"
AFAIK it is 6mm cement fibre board in 2'x3' sheets that are fixed with
polyurethane glue and screws and cost 10? /sheet.
I wonder if its the same as "RCM Multipupose fibre cement board - A high
performance cellulose fibre cement sheet which can be used in an extensive
range of application both internally and externally. Key Benefits: Excellent
weathering properties, high tensile strength, high MoE, smooth finish for
paint, excellent acoustic
performance. A very strong versatile board." A 6mm 8x4 sheet being 15 on
their price list at
http://www.rcmltd.biz/RCM%20Price%20...Jan%202009.pdf. This board
should address water issues but also glued & screwed should add significant
rigidity to a chipboard floor.

Peterk

  #8  
Old April 26th 09, 10:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,112
Default Tiling on particle board




One advertised solution is something that sounds/spells like "no more ply"
AFAIK it is 6mm cement fibre board in 2'x3' sheets that are fixed with
polyurethane glue and screws and cost 10? /sheet.
I wonder if its the same as "RCM Multipupose fibre cement board - A high
performance cellulose fibre cement sheet which can be used in an extensive
range of application both internally and externally. Key Benefits:
Excellent weathering properties, high tensile strength, high MoE, smooth
finish for paint, excellent acoustic
performance. A very strong versatile board." A 6mm 8x4 sheet being 15
on their price list at
http://www.rcmltd.biz/RCM%20Price%20...Jan%202009.pdf. This board
should address water issues but also glued & screwed should add
significant rigidity to a chipboard floor.

Peterk

Is that flexible enough not to crack when put down on a floor? I'm thinking
particularly of floors in old properties where there may be a bit of
movement in the odd joist.

  #9  
Old April 26th 09, 11:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 43
Default Tiling on particle board


"newshound" wrote in message
...



One advertised solution is something that sounds/spells like "no more
ply" AFAIK it is 6mm cement fibre board in 2'x3' sheets that are fixed
with polyurethane glue and screws and cost 10? /sheet.
I wonder if its the same as "RCM Multipupose fibre cement board - A high
performance cellulose fibre cement sheet which can be used in an
extensive range of application both internally and externally. Key
Benefits: Excellent weathering properties, high tensile strength, high
MoE, smooth finish for paint, excellent acoustic
performance. A very strong versatile board." A 6mm 8x4 sheet being 15
on their price list at
http://www.rcmltd.biz/RCM%20Price%20...Jan%202009.pdf. This board
should address water issues but also glued & screwed should add
significant rigidity to a chipboard floor.

Peterk

Is that flexible enough not to crack when put down on a floor? I'm
thinking particularly of floors in old properties where there may be a bit
of movement in the odd joist.

I presume that is where the polyurethane glue comes in since it foams into
gaps during setting and where there are gaps the foam would compress/stretch
if the underlying board moved . I wouldn't like to try and remove stuck
down boards - I've been caught once with the glue got some on one hand
transferred it to the other without noticing and ended up with the stuff
stuck to my hands for 3 days! Fibre cement board is pretty tough stuff but
does have some flexibilty and I think it would stand significant stress.
I'm tempted to ring RMC and ask why aquapanel, hadiebacker etc. are the same
product or what is the difference.

PeterK

  #10  
Old April 27th 09, 12:49 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 18,783
Default Tiling on particle board

newshound wrote:



One advertised solution is something that sounds/spells like "no more
ply" AFAIK it is 6mm cement fibre board in 2'x3' sheets that are fixed
with polyurethane glue and screws and cost 10? /sheet.
I wonder if its the same as "RCM Multipupose fibre cement board - A
high performance cellulose fibre cement sheet which can be used in an
extensive range of application both internally and externally. Key
Benefits: Excellent weathering properties, high tensile strength, high
MoE, smooth finish for paint, excellent acoustic
performance. A very strong versatile board." A 6mm 8x4 sheet being
15 on their price list at
http://www.rcmltd.biz/RCM%20Price%20...Jan%202009.pdf. This board
should address water issues but also glued & screwed should add
significant rigidity to a chipboard floor.

Peterk

Is that flexible enough not to crack when put down on a floor? I'm
thinking particularly of floors in old properties where there may be a
bit of movement in the odd joist.


If you have a floor like that do not even THINK of tiling it without
stiffening it.


 




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