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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 30th 07, 04:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 101
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

How safe is it to fix a boiler of about 45Kg to a breeze block wall?
The manual states simply to fix it on a strong wall.
Breeze blocks are widely used for external wall (on the inner leave at
least), so I'm assuming it is safe.
Perhaps it is better to use suitable plugs...

Any suggestions?
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  #3  
Old November 30th 07, 05:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
TMC
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Posts: 406
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall


wrote in message
...
How safe is it to fix a boiler of about 45Kg to a breeze block wall?
The manual states simply to fix it on a strong wall.
Breeze blocks are widely used for external wall (on the inner leave at
least), so I'm assuming it is safe.
Perhaps it is better to use suitable plugs...

Any suggestions?




The ability to support loads is not the same as the ability to hold a small
fixing in place

If they are breeze block and not the soft Durox blocks you should be Ok

I normally cut wooden pads into breeze block walls and either skim with
plaster (or set the pads flush with the wall and tile over where I am tiling
anyway)

I fit these pads with plugs and screws into the solid bits of the breeze
block rather than the cavity bits. I also use some gripfill as a belt and
braces approach but then I tend to over engineer most jobs

Having said that I have fixed Combi boilers direct to breeze block in
attics.

There was additional support via the big balanced flue vent and the support
plate at the bottom for the pipework so the boiler was not just supported on
the screw fixings

Tony


  #4  
Old November 30th 07, 05:16 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 101
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

On Nov 30, 4:53 pm, Andy Hall wrote:
On 2007-11-30 16:25:58 +0000, said:

How safe is it to fix a boiler of about 45Kg to a breeze block wall?
The manual states simply to fix it on a strong wall.
Breeze blocks are widely used for external wall (on the inner leave at
least), so I'm assuming it is safe.
Perhaps it is better to use suitable plugs...


Any suggestions?


Yes you can.

Keep in mind that the weight is predominantly in a downward direction.

You can use heavy duty long fixings suitable for the material.

I used polyester resin fixings for mine. This technique involves the
use of threaded studs of a diameter suitable for the holes in the
boiler mounting bracket, and of a length of (say) 100mm. Holes are
drilled into the wall 2mm oversize for the studs and cleaned out.
A special two part resin with one part containing mortar is injected
into the holes and the studs inserted. After a suitable time
(minutes to hours depending on resin and temperature, the bracket can
be fixed to the wall.

This method is ideal for heavy weights on breeze blocks because there
is not the risk of crumbling around the fixing.

Screwfix among others sell the materials


Thanks, I'll check it.
Meanwhile, I've forgotten a very important detail.
The wall at the moment is bare...no rendering, but I've planned to use
celotex insulation and plasterboard...I guess I'll have to use a
proper studding frame behind the boiler and then look for longer
screws (or these polyester fixings) to account for the thickness of
the studs.
On the other hand, it may seem a bit wacky but what about fixing the
boiler straight to the bare wall and then later on fixing the
insulation and plasterboard all around the boiler? The cold bridge
shouldn't be an issue as the boiler is on when it's cold outside.
At the moment I haven't really made my final decision...I just prefer
to mount the boiler now and get the heating system going. The drywall
can wait.
  #5  
Old November 30th 07, 05:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 101
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

Tony says: "If they are breeze block and not the soft Durox blocks you
should be Ok"

Just to clearify. The blocks in question are areated...I can't think
of anything weaker than this stuff.
I've bought them from a local B&Q store....
Maybe I'll have to check my terminology better next time, but I think
my concerns were justified.



  #7  
Old November 30th 07, 05:46 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,056
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

wrote:
On Nov 30, 4:53 pm, Andy Hall wrote:
On 2007-11-30 16:25:58 +0000, said:

How safe is it to fix a boiler of about 45Kg to a breeze block wall?
The manual states simply to fix it on a strong wall.
Breeze blocks are widely used for external wall (on the inner leave at
least), so I'm assuming it is safe.
Perhaps it is better to use suitable plugs...
Any suggestions?

Yes you can.

Keep in mind that the weight is predominantly in a downward direction.

You can use heavy duty long fixings suitable for the material.

I used polyester resin fixings for mine. This technique involves the
use of threaded studs of a diameter suitable for the holes in the
boiler mounting bracket, and of a length of (say) 100mm. Holes are
drilled into the wall 2mm oversize for the studs and cleaned out.
A special two part resin with one part containing mortar is injected
into the holes and the studs inserted. After a suitable time
(minutes to hours depending on resin and temperature, the bracket can
be fixed to the wall.

This method is ideal for heavy weights on breeze blocks because there
is not the risk of crumbling around the fixing.

Screwfix among others sell the materials


Thanks, I'll check it.
Meanwhile, I've forgotten a very important detail.
The wall at the moment is bare...no rendering, but I've planned to use
celotex insulation and plasterboard...I guess I'll have to use a
proper studding frame behind the boiler and then look for longer
screws (or these polyester fixings) to account for the thickness of
the studs.


I would be tempted to use a bit of 19mm MDF on some reduced depth studs
and plaster over that AND the board..use scrim tape between the
plasterbaord and tehe MDF to avoid cracking.

Ive done this a few times, and it makes for a very stable and easy to
use surface for screws and the like. Anytime I try to fix to
plasterboard and rip out the screws, I cut a bit out, notch the studs,
let in the MDF and plaster over...




On the other hand, it may seem a bit wacky but what about fixing the
boiler straight to the bare wall and then later on fixing the
insulation and plasterboard all around the boiler? The cold bridge
shouldn't be an issue as the boiler is on when it's cold outside.


So you will lose even MORE heat that way...

At the moment I haven't really made my final decision...I just prefer
to mount the boiler now and get the heating system going. The drywall
can wait.


No. Dop teh drywall first and boiler up later.

Its a piece iof **** to knock up stud work with a bit pf MDF or ply on
it and the rest plasterboard..if money is available use ply throughout
instead of plasterboard actually. Skimming is the nastiest bit and thats
a LOT easier if there is no boiler in the way.

  #8  
Old November 30th 07, 05:47 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,325
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

On 30 Nov, 17:29, wrote:
Tony says: "If they are breeze block and not the soft Durox blocks you
should be Ok"

Just to clearify. The blocks in question are areated...I can't think
of anything weaker than this stuff.
I've bought them from a local B&Q store....
Maybe I'll have to check my terminology better next time, but I think
my concerns were justified.


I always worry about aircrete blocks, but other folks on this group
tell me not to worry. But I am *still* not convinced ;-) I wanted to
use something else on my extension plans, but the walls would have had
to be much thicker thus losing interior space, and the BCO hates "non-
standard" designs.
I will have to mount a boiler near the top of such a wall. I will
probably mount a large piece of 18mm ply (or thick cement board if
heat issues) with lots of long fixings and mount through this and into
the wall behind. Or mount an comprehensive angle-iron frame and fix
the boiler to that. This would give some lateral support to the wall.
It will be in some time of cupboard arrangement, so I may not
plasterboard the back of this.
It's all very well to say most of the weight is down, but when someone
slips and grabs the thing ...
Good luck,
Simon.
  #9  
Old November 30th 07, 06:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 101
Default mounting a boiler onto a Breeze block wall

On Nov 30, 5:45 pm, robert wrote:
wrote:
Tony says: "If they are breeze block and not the soft Durox blocks you
should be Ok"


Just to clearify. The blocks in question are areated...I can't think
of anything weaker than this stuff.
I've bought them from a local B&Q store....
Maybe I'll have to check my terminology better next time, but I think
my concerns were justified.


How heavy were the blocks - a 1 hand lift or 2 hand lift (breeze block) ?
Another approach is to fix a wooden plate ( ply) to the wall ( same size
as boiler) using several fixing and then fix boiler to plate.
This way you can make sure you get good a few good fixs for the plate (
the boiler fixing holes are bound to line up with mortar joints)
and fixing the boiler level will be easy.


1 hand lift for sure...and I'm not Hercules.
As I said I can't think any block or brick weaker than this
stuff....they were more expensive than high density blocks, apparently
the aerated ones are great for thermal insulation but not very
"trusty" are they? Or maybe it's just a psychologic issue.
Meanwhile I'll consider the wooden plate or other similar
solutions...just for a bit of piece of mind.
 




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