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Electric fence power indicator? Neon?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 23rd 03, 12:30 AM
Andy Dingley
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 22:56:02 +0100, Chris Wilson
wrote:

You can buy some sort of neon indicators from the electric
fence makers, but they are about 20 quid each...


Neon and a capacitor (maybe 0.22uF) in parallel, fed from a bridge
rectifier. Cost a quid or so.

--
Smert' spamionam
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  #2  
Old September 23rd 03, 12:33 AM
Grunff
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

Andy Dingley wrote:

Neon and a capacitor (maybe 0.22uF) in parallel, fed from a bridge
rectifier. Cost a quid or so.


Why the capacitor? If the fence is pulsed, as all of ours are
(at ~ 1 Hz) then just a neon with a ~1M resistor works great.

--
Grunff

  #4  
Old September 23rd 03, 12:59 AM
Grunff
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

Chris Wilson wrote:

Neon as in a mains tester screwdriver neon?


A mains tester screwdriver contains a neon bulb and a series
resistor. The neon bulb is just a small glass envelope with low
pressure neon and two electrodes


Are neons different voltages?


Not as such - you need to limit the current through them with a
resistor, the value of which will depend on your voltage.


If the signal lamp was fairly bright could see
it from the house, which would be good.


Depends what your HT circuit's like, but I suspect if you were
drawing that much power from it there wouldn't be much left to
mainain a good fence voltage.

--
Grunff

  #5  
Old September 23rd 03, 01:11 AM
Grunff
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

fred wrote:

10mA sounds like an awful lot for the neon (if the 10kV is right), you'll have
nothing left to zap the birds ;-). I was going to suggest 1mA from 4x2M2
high voltage resistors in series with a standard mains neon.


I don't reckon ours put out any more than 2-3kV once hooked up
to a few hundred metres of fence tape - much less in the wet.

--
Grunff

  #6  
Old September 23rd 03, 01:43 AM
fred
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

In article , Grunff
writes
fred wrote:

10mA sounds like an awful lot for the neon (if the 10kV is right), you'll have
nothing left to zap the birds ;-). I was going to suggest 1mA from 4x2M2
high voltage resistors in series with a standard mains neon.


I don't reckon ours put out any more than 2-3kV once hooked up
to a few hundred metres of fence tape - much less in the wet.

Ahhhhhhhh, theory and practice diverge again :-). Still, the HV resistors
are prob still a good idea, standard are prob only 500V . . . . Maplin codes
are 'V' +value , values 1M, 2M2, 4M7, 10M and are 3.5kV working, subject
to power rating.
--
fred
  #7  
Old September 23rd 03, 02:49 AM
Grunff
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

Andy Dingley wrote:

Depends on the earth, and the type of fence driver. If you have a low
earth impedance, and can get a decent voltage on the neon, then your
design will work. If the earth is lousy, then the rectifier-capacitor
design can charge up successive pulses until there's enough to flash
the neon.


True, very true.


There's a guy near my parents (West Lancs) who (like everyone around
there) has lots of glasshouses. In the Xmas runup, and to provide a
burglar alarm for the glasshouses, he keeps geese outside around them.
His fence has fluorescent tubes hung off it, which manage to flash
quite impressively. I've no idea what he drives the fence with, but
I'm not touching it....


Must be an interesting sight. A farmer not so far from here
drives his fences with old neon sign trannies. *OUCH*

--
Grunff

  #8  
Old September 23rd 03, 10:59 AM
Andy Dingley
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 00:51:28 +0100, Dave Plowman
wrote:

Why not do it at the low voltage side? Of course, this won't check that
the unit is actually working, but only switched on.


The usual need for a fence detector is to check that the wire hasn't
been broken.
--
Smert' spamionam
  #9  
Old September 23rd 03, 11:11 AM
Andrew Gabriel
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

In article ,
Chris Wilson writes:
Would like some DIY means of having a visual light indicator that power
is on to an electric fence (well, fenceS actually), one around a chicken
run, using poultry netting, and the other wires around a 3/4 acre bird
enclosure. You can buy some sort of neon indicators from the electric
fence makers, but they are about 20 quid each... I was thinking something
about 2 quid each G. The potential on the wires is between 9 and 10 KV,
to a decent earth. Thanks.


Try a wire-ended neon, one end connected to fence and other end
just pointing away from the fence wire into the air. If it's too
dim, extend the wire pointing into the air. This is how some of
the much larger aircraft warning lamps strung along HV transmission
lines work -- the floating wire leaks enough current by corona
discharge and capacitively to light the lamps.

--
Andrew Gabriel
  #10  
Old September 23rd 03, 11:29 AM
Dave Plowman
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Default Electric fence power indicator? Neon?

In article ,
Andy Dingley wrote:
Why not do it at the low voltage side? Of course, this won't check that
the unit is actually working, but only switched on.


The usual need for a fence detector is to check that the wire hasn't
been broken.


Ah. The OP simply asked for an indication that it was 'on'. And for
several fences.

--
*All men are idiots, and I married their King.

Dave Plowman London SW 12
RIP Acorn
 




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