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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 30th 07, 02:18 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 5
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit

I've seen installations where this type of conduit has been bent at 90
degree's and at various angles.

My question is how is this done ? Do you have to gently warm the
conduit to do this ? Must the conduit be supported on the inside so
that it doesn't collapse ?

It must be possible but I need to know how ?

TIA

Andy.

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  #2  
Old August 30th 07, 02:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,160
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit


wrote in message
ups.com...
I've seen installations where this type of conduit has been bent at

90
degree's and at various angles.

My question is how is this done ? Do you have to gently warm the
conduit to do this ? Must the conduit be supported on the inside so
that it doesn't collapse ?

It must be possible but I need to know how ?

TIA

Andy.


A conventional pipe bender can be used on black metal or galvanised
conduit - (you need the correct sized former though). Plastic conduit
comes in two 'weights' thick and thin walled. The thick walled variety
can be bent with a pipe bender, but the thin walled variety needs an
internal spring. With either weight of plastic conduit you get far
more 'spring back' than with metal conduit, and it varies quite a bit
from make to make, so you have to 'bend further' than you would for
metal. Be aware that the thin walled type will often show the spring
pattern on the outside after bending.

AWEM


  #3  
Old August 30th 07, 03:27 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 19,770
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit

In article . com,
wrote:
I've seen installations where this type of conduit has been bent at 90
degree's and at various angles.


My question is how is this done ? Do you have to gently warm the
conduit to do this ? Must the conduit be supported on the inside so
that it doesn't collapse ?


It must be possible but I need to know how ?


What sort of conduit - steel or plastic?

--
*When you've seen one shopping centre you've seen a mall*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #4  
Old August 30th 07, 03:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19,770
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit

In article ,
Andrew Mawson wrote:
A conventional pipe bender can be used on black metal or galvanised
conduit - (you need the correct sized former though).


I used to have a conduit bender (Hilmore) and it's rather different from a
copper pipe one. Unfortunately none of the bits from the same maker could
be swapped to have just one for both. The conduit one didn't use a top
former but a shaped roller. And although at first glance the 'frame'
looked the same it wasn't in practice. Could be another maker was more
sensible, though.

--
*The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese *

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #5  
Old August 30th 07, 04:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,160
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit


"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Andrew Mawson wrote:
A conventional pipe bender can be used on black metal or

galvanised
conduit - (you need the correct sized former though).


I used to have a conduit bender (Hilmore) and it's rather different

from a
copper pipe one. Unfortunately none of the bits from the same maker

could
be swapped to have just one for both. The conduit one didn't use a

top
former but a shaped roller. And although at first glance the 'frame'
looked the same it wasn't in practice. Could be another maker was

more
sensible, though.

--
*The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese

*

Dave Plowman London SW


I have a very comprehensive Record pipe bender with all the metric and
Imperial formers for both copper and gas barrel, however the formers
from my old Hilmor bender fit it exactly. Usually for steel pipe you
have the female former to bend round, and the 'puller' has a grooved
wheel to run on the outside of the tube, however with the old style of
steel conduit that was bent from plate and not electically welded
along the join not only did you have to use a 'U' guide bar under the
puller, but also you had to be very careful where the pipe seem was
relative to the bend direction or it opened up.

AWEM


  #6  
Old August 30th 07, 07:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,027
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit


wrote in message
ups.com...
I've seen installations where this type of conduit has been bent at 90
degree's and at various angles.

My question is how is this done ? Do you have to gently warm the
conduit to do this ? Must the conduit be supported on the inside so
that it doesn't collapse ?


Thick wall PVC conduit can be bent using a hot air gun. Don't get it too
close, particularly with white, which can discolour. Play the gun along the
whole length of the bit you want to bend, turning the conduit to get the
heat even. When it starts to droop, it can be curved to shape and left to
cool on a hard surface. You may need to press gently on the sides to get it
round. If it kinks, you are trying to get too small a radius and should use
a solvent weld inspection bend or elbow instead. I've used this for many
difficult locations, including a double curve bringing a pair of conduits
down one face of a 4" square post and turning them so that one feeds a
socket on each of the two adjacent faces.

Colin Bignell


  #7  
Old August 30th 07, 08:26 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,309
Default Bending 20mm Round Electrical Conduit

In article ,
"nightjar" nightjar@insert my surname here.uk.com writes:

Thick wall PVC conduit can be bent using a hot air gun. Don't get it too
close, particularly with white, which can discolour. Play the gun along the
whole length of the bit you want to bend, turning the conduit to get the
heat even. When it starts to droop, it can be curved to shape and left to
cool on a hard surface. You may need to press gently on the sides to get it
round. If it kinks, you are trying to get too small a radius and should use
a solvent weld inspection bend or elbow instead. I've used this for many


You can buy preformed swept bends too.

difficult locations, including a double curve bringing a pair of conduits
down one face of a 4" square post and turning them so that one feeds a
socket on each of the two adjacent faces.


--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
 




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