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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Sugar Soap -- good enough?



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 1st 07, 05:10 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,232
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

Steve Firth wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:

Sugar soap is really designed to remove grease and other alkali soluble
gunk, and I don't think many of us live like that nowadays.


Most of what sticks dirt togther is grease of some form or another.
Either from human skin or often from trace quantities in the air (or
large quantities if one lives in diesel-soaked London.).

Interesting that sugar is quite a good abrasive, as is bicarbonate of
soda, but nothing IME makes the job any easier


I don't know if you are random word associating


I have nothing better to do

, but sugar soap has
nothing to do with sugar.


Sugar with soap (or washing up liquid)is a damned fine hand cleaner as
it happens, and it's reasonable to suppose its abrasive qualities were
not unknown to decorators. Then again, maybe someone just decided "sugar
soap" was a great name for something that had nothing to do with sugar.

And bicarbonate of soda works pretty much like
sugar soap in that it will solubilise lipids.

I believe sugar soap is now based on a fairly insipid detergent rather
than the phosphates it used to consist of.
Bicarb is sparingly soluble in water, hence its effectiveness as a mild
abrasive in a paste.
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  #12  
Old August 1st 07, 06:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

On Aug 1, 5:10 pm, Stuart Noble
wrote:
Steve Firth wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:


Sugar soap is really designed to remove grease and other alkali soluble
gunk, and I don't think many of us live like that nowadays.


Most of what sticks dirt togther is grease of some form or another.
Either from human skin or often from trace quantities in the air (or
large quantities if one lives in diesel-soaked London.).


Interesting that sugar is quite a good abrasive, as is bicarbonate of
soda, but nothing IME makes the job any easier


I don't know if you are random word associating


I have nothing better to do

, but sugar soap has

nothing to do with sugar.


Sugar with soap (or washing up liquid)is a damned fine hand cleaner as
it happens, and it's reasonable to suppose its abrasive qualities were
not unknown to decorators. Then again, maybe someone just decided "sugar
soap" was a great name for something that had nothing to do with sugar.

And bicarbonate of soda works pretty much like sugar soap in that it will solubilise lipids.

I believe sugar soap is now based on a fairly insipid detergent rather
than the phosphates it used to consist of.
Bicarb is sparingly soluble in water, hence its effectiveness as a mild
abrasive in a paste.


This is an interesting discussion, I painted some woodwork last year
using DPBW and I am about to do some more as I decorate other rooms
this month. But I have noticed that the wood I re-painted last year
looks no brighter now than wood that I am about to re-paint that is a
few years old.

Is there a reason that even DPBW yellows so quickly. Im almost
wondering whether there is any point in painting it anway since it
will look the same next year as it does now! Is it in my prep or the
paint I wonder!

Rajeev

  #13  
Old August 1st 07, 06:38 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 107
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

jal wrote:


Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking: a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.


I HATE "Glossing", not so much the actual painting but the sheer
effort involved in keeping everything clean (ie brushes after painting,
carpet whilst it is on going, wall paper if leaving it on after painting
etc.)
Your method sounds like a plan, however you may also want to knock of
any "snots" (collections of paint around e.g. a piece of lint)and give
everything (that is to be glossed) a light sanding (possibly a "20
special" sander from Lidl).
Best of the lot is an empty room. Ceiling to be painted, walls to be
papered. Ceiling gets emulsioned, letting a *little" paint cover the
top of the wall then Gloss the woodwork letting a *little* paint cover
the wall then paper any where the trimming is just a tad tight the wee
bit extra paint shows through (the ceiling or woodwork colour) and
doesn't catch the eye so much. The glossing is so much easier if carpet
or masking is not involved.
--
www.cheesesoup.myby.co.uk
  #14  
Old August 1st 07, 06:44 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
rrh
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Posts: 110
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?


"jal" wrote in message
...
I really hate painting gloss. Trouble is, all the woodwork in our (60s)
house is painted white, and it's mostly looking grubby now, so I'm going
to have to re-paint it all. There's bloody miles of it, plus some big
panels on the stairs.

Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking: a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.

Can I get away with that?

John


I second John Evans's suggestion of liquid sander. The only one I've seen on
sale is I think called Easy Sand and is made by International. Works well
and avoids the dust from sanding which I hate.


  #15  
Old August 1st 07, 07:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,232
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

rrh wrote:
"jal" wrote in message
...
I really hate painting gloss. Trouble is, all the woodwork in our (60s)
house is painted white, and it's mostly looking grubby now, so I'm going
to have to re-paint it all. There's bloody miles of it, plus some big
panels on the stairs.

Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking: a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.

Can I get away with that?

John


I second John Evans's suggestion of liquid sander. The only one I've seen on
sale is I think called Easy Sand and is made by International. Works well
and avoids the dust from sanding which I hate.



I don't know that it does anything much at all other than slightly
polish the surface. If it doesn't attack the finish in any way and
powders off if you dust the surface, what use is it?
  #16  
Old August 1st 07, 08:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 1,160
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?


"soup" wrote in message
k...
jal wrote:


Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking:

a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat

Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.


I HATE "Glossing", not so much the actual painting but the sheer
effort involved in keeping everything clean (ie brushes after

painting,
carpet whilst it is on going, wall paper if leaving it on after

painting
etc.)


SNIP


I've totally given up washing gloss paint brushes. At the end of the
day I wrap them tightly in cling film. Next day I smooth them out with
a rag soaked in white spirit and carry on painting. At the end of the
job the brush gets thrown away and a new one bought for the next job.
Saves a huges amount of time and considerable amounts of white spirit.

AWEM


  #17  
Old August 1st 07, 08:21 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
rrh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 110
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?


"Stuart Noble" wrote in message
news
rrh wrote:
"jal" wrote in message
...
I really hate painting gloss. Trouble is, all the woodwork in our (60s)
house is painted white, and it's mostly looking grubby now, so I'm going
to have to re-paint it all. There's bloody miles of it, plus some big
panels on the stairs.

Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking: a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.

Can I get away with that?

John


I second John Evans's suggestion of liquid sander. The only one I've seen
on sale is I think called Easy Sand and is made by International. Works
well and avoids the dust from sanding which I hate.


I don't know that it does anything much at all other than slightly polish
the surface. If it doesn't attack the finish in any way and powders off if
you dust the surface, what use is it?


I think it does attack the finish. It certainly takes a bit of the shine off
gloss. The instructions say paint within 6 hours for best results. That
implies to me that it softens the finish or in some other way makes it
better as a surface for new paint.


  #18  
Old August 1st 07, 08:28 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,232
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

rrh wrote:
"Stuart Noble" wrote in message
news
rrh wrote:
"jal" wrote in message
...
I really hate painting gloss. Trouble is, all the woodwork in our (60s)
house is painted white, and it's mostly looking grubby now, so I'm going
to have to re-paint it all. There's bloody miles of it, plus some big
panels on the stairs.

Is Sugar Soap good enough to prepare the surfaces? I'm thinking: a good
wash with Sugar Soap (and presumably a good rinse); undercoat Dulux
Professional Brilliant White; topcoat DPBW.

Can I get away with that?

John
I second John Evans's suggestion of liquid sander. The only one I've seen
on sale is I think called Easy Sand and is made by International. Works
well and avoids the dust from sanding which I hate.

I don't know that it does anything much at all other than slightly polish
the surface. If it doesn't attack the finish in any way and powders off if
you dust the surface, what use is it?


I think it does attack the finish. It certainly takes a bit of the shine off
gloss. The instructions say paint within 6 hours for best results. That
implies to me that it softens the finish or in some other way makes it
better as a surface for new paint.



If it attacked the surface, it would have to contain a strong solvent.
AFAIK these products are simply fine abrasives in a gel. Any abrading is
done by the user in the removal of the dried film, so you might as well
sand in the first place
  #19  
Old August 1st 07, 08:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 107
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

Andrew Mawson wrote:

I've totally given up washing gloss paint brushes. At the end of the
job the brush gets thrown away and a new one bought for the next job.


I must admit that tends to happen with me too. I start with lots of
good intentions that I am going to clean these brushes but every time
when I am finished the brushes get the Heave-Ho.
The only trouble with this approach is that if you get good brushes
it's money down the drain and if you get cheapo brushes the finish is
not as good as desired.
Does anyone have a (cheap and easy) method of cleaning Gloss brushes
that doesn't involve gallons and gallons of white spirit (are there any
P&Ds in the house)?

--
www.cheesesoup.myby.co.uk
  #20  
Old August 1st 07, 10:16 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default Sugar Soap -- good enough?

On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 10:24:56 -0700,
wrote:

On Aug 1, 5:10 pm, Stuart Noble
wrote:
Steve Firth wrote:
Stuart Noble wrote:


Sugar soap is really designed to remove grease and other alkali soluble
gunk, and I don't think many of us live like that nowadays.


Most of what sticks dirt togther is grease of some form or another.
Either from human skin or often from trace quantities in the air (or
large quantities if one lives in diesel-soaked London.).


Interesting that sugar is quite a good abrasive, as is bicarbonate of
soda, but nothing IME makes the job any easier


I don't know if you are random word associating


I have nothing better to do

, but sugar soap has

nothing to do with sugar.


Sugar with soap (or washing up liquid)is a damned fine hand cleaner as
it happens, and it's reasonable to suppose its abrasive qualities were
not unknown to decorators. Then again, maybe someone just decided "sugar
soap" was a great name for something that had nothing to do with sugar.

And bicarbonate of soda works pretty much like sugar soap in that it will solubilise lipids.

I believe sugar soap is now based on a fairly insipid detergent rather
than the phosphates it used to consist of.
Bicarb is sparingly soluble in water, hence its effectiveness as a mild
abrasive in a paste.


This is an interesting discussion, I painted some woodwork last year
using DPBW and I am about to do some more as I decorate other rooms
this month. But I have noticed that the wood I re-painted last year
looks no brighter now than wood that I am about to re-paint that is a
few years old.

Is there a reason that even DPBW yellows so quickly. Im almost
wondering whether there is any point in painting it anway since it
will look the same next year as it does now! Is it in my prep or the
paint I wonder!

Rajeev


It's because it's an oil based paint and your rooms must be quite
dark!

Water based paints are much less liable to yellowing, although it's
harder to get a decent finish with them. Oil based paints discolour
less if they are in the light.
 




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