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What is an ideal heating temp



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 15th 06, 09:28 AM
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2006
Posts: 1
Default What is an ideal heating temp

Any help on this matter greatly apprecaited

We have just moved into a 3 storey house , that has gas central heating boiler.

What is the ideal temp in 0c to operate this to heat the house.

weve been told different things by people we know , but im still unsure.

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c

also what would be ideal times for setting heating to ?? is is ideal to have it on for say 2 hrs in am , and 2 hours at night , does that use up more gas, or have it on for longer

Any advice??

Simon

Last edited by manxtatt2 : October 15th 06 at 09:30 AM.
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  #2  
Old October 15th 06, 12:45 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 73
Default What is an ideal heating temp

manxtatt2 wrote in
:

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c


You might find this kinda warm.

Experiment around 20 deg, perhaps 17 in bedrooms.

Your body should tell you; also I note the "*we've* just moved in"

So if your body doesn't SWMBO will! ;-)

mike
  #3  
Old October 15th 06, 01:05 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,132
Default What is an ideal heating temp

On 2006-10-15 08:28:14 +0100, manxtatt2 said:


Any help on this matter greatly apprecaited

We have just moved into a 3 storey house , that has gas central heating
boiler.

What is the ideal temp in 0c to operate this to heat the house.

weve been told different things by people we know , but im still
unsure.

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c

also what would be ideal times for setting heating to ?? is is ideal
to have it on for say 2 hrs in am , and 2 hours at night , does that
use up more gas, or have it on for longer
Any advice??

Simon


This depends on the boiler and radiators.

If you have a conventional heating boiler, it should be run at its
design temperature, which is around 80 degrees on the flow side.
If it is run a lot cooler than that, there is a risk of condensation of
flue products inside the boiler and consequent corrosion. Generally
the boiler thermostat should not allow setting to temperatures low
enough to cause a problem, but certainly 50 degrees or even 60 flow
would take you to the point of internal condensation.

There is a newer type of boiler (condensing), which is now more or less
mandatory to fit unless you have particularly unusual set of
installation conditions. These can be 30% or so more efficient than
some of the oldest conventional boilers and there is legislation on
fitting them in new or replacement installations except in exceptional
cases.
In this type, the intention is that condensing does take place in the
boiler, and the water is collected and fed to a drain. While these
will work at the higher temperatures of the conventional boiler, they
run more efficiently at lower temperatures.

However, if your system was originally designed for a conventional
boiler, it is likely that the radiators will have been sized for 80
degree operation and 0 or -3 degrees outside. Unless they were
oversized, running at 50 degrees may not give enough heat output in
cold weather. This still means that a condensing boiler is worthwhile
because for most of the year that level of heat output is not required
and the boiler can run at a lower temperature and hence more efficiently

The other factor in low temperature operation would be that it would
take longer to warm the house if it's really cold outside if radiators
are run at 50 vs 80 degrees.

Switch on and running times are a personal choice. Of course running
for longer uses more fuel, the other side of the coin is level of
comfort.

One thing that you can do is to change the room thermostat for one with
optimised start and perhaps night setback.

Optimised start is basically that the thermostat monitors how long it
takes the heating system to raise the house temperature to the point
you set. This is averaged over a few days. So for example, if you
want it to be up to temperature at 0700 when you get up, it might need
to start at 0615 on a cold day and so on.

Night set back means that instead of turning off the heating totally at
night, it backs off the temperature by a few degrees. For example, you
might set a setback of 6 or 7 degrees against a desired room
temperature of 21 degrees and allow the temperature to fall to 14 or 15
during the night. Through much of the year, this doesn't use any or
much extra energy, but in the coldest weather is pleasant if you need
to get up during the night. Also, in some houses, it may actually
prevent the temperature overshooting the set point by as much on the
morning warm up and hence actually save fuel use overall.

If you don't have them, a useful investment is thermostatic radiator
valves on the room radiators (all but the one where the room thermostat
is). These allow finer control of room temperature and save fuel as
well.


  #4  
Old October 15th 06, 02:50 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 13
Default What is an ideal heating temp

mike wrote:
I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c


You might find this kinda warm.

Experiment around 20 deg, perhaps 17 in bedrooms.


You think that water in the radiators at 20C will heat the rooms to the
same temperature?

Alex

  #5  
Old October 15th 06, 03:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 15,677
Default What is an ideal heating temp

manxtatt2 wrote:

What Andy said, plus:

also what would be ideal times for setting heating to ?? is is ideal
to have it on for say 2 hrs in am , and 2 hours at night , does that
use up more gas, or have it on for longer


Using a programmable thermostat is perhaps the simplest way. That way
you simply leave the heating "on" permanently - the stat then controls
when it needs to run to reach your pre-set temps. Hence you can have it
warmer for some times of the day, and cooler at others.

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
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  #6  
Old October 15th 06, 04:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 32
Default What is an ideal heating temp

"manxtatt2" wrote in message
...

Any help on this matter greatly apprecaited

We have just moved into a 3 storey house , that has gas central heating
boiler.

What is the ideal temp in 0c to operate this to heat the house.

weve been told different things by people we know , but im still
unsure.

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c

also what would be ideal times for setting heating to ?? is is ideal
to have it on for say 2 hrs in am , and 2 hours at night , does that
use up more gas, or have it on for longer

Any advice??


As for times, set it to whatever suits your lifestyle. When it's cold we
generally have ours come on an hour or so before people get up, then it goes
off after everyone leaves. It comes back on just before the kids get home,
then off again about ten o-clock. Mostly though we don't use the timer - put
it on when it feels cold for an hour.

We had a condensing boiler fitted last year and it is a lot more responsive
than the back boiler we used to have. For showers - heat water for an hour
in the morning, then off all day. If someone wants a shower, they set the
water on for an hour and just go straight in - the water will still be hot
from the morning.

Paul

Simon




--
manxtatt2



  #7  
Old October 15th 06, 06:46 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,121
Default What is an ideal heating temp

The message
from manxtatt2 contains these words:

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c


Christ, you'd roast! Or do you mean the outlet temperature of the boiler?

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  #8  
Old October 16th 06, 01:00 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 9,056
Default What is an ideal heating temp

manxtatt2 wrote:
Any help on this matter greatly apprecaited

We have just moved into a 3 storey house , that has gas central heating
boiler.

What is the ideal temp in 0c to operate this to heat the house.


If heating requirements are low, you lose a bit less from loft pipes
going low. Also bolers are more effcient at lower temps I THINK. Not sure ..

But when it gets really cold you need the thing up around 60-70C to heat
teh house at all..

weve been told different things by people we know , but im still
unsure.

I think that around 75 or 80c is right , yet someone else says 50c

also what would be ideal times for setting heating to ?? is is ideal
to have it on for say 2 hrs in am , and 2 hours at night , does that
use up more gas, or have it on for longer


If the house is well insulated and has good thermal mass inside the
insulation, it makes very little difference to cost when you heat it -
heat is retained well.

If its got low thermal mass and/or insulation then you want to only heat
when you need it, and it will warm up fast.

The coldest, as well as the darkest, hour is just before the dawn.. I
find that in winter, I want to start my underfloor heating about midday,
so we have good output by 3pm. In a low mass house with poor insulation
you can go to about 3pm. Frankly if its bloody cold I go to 24x7 because
we are both in all day anyway.

OTOH is its a case of a low thermal mass house and everyone is out all
day at work/school,. light up the boiler about half an hour before you
get in. And run it to half an hour before bedtime, and get a good duvet
or a willing wife..;-)

Personally I hate getting up into the cold, so heating on half and hour
or more before getting is good, and time the water to heat up even
earlier...and switch off half an hour before you leave for work.







Any advice??

Simon




  #9  
Old October 16th 06, 08:47 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,121
Default What is an ideal heating temp

The message
from The Natural Philosopher contains these words:

Also bolers are more effcient at lower temps I THINK. Not sure ..


They should be. You can't transfer energy so easily into a warm body
from a hot one as you can into a cool body from a hot one.

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  #10  
Old October 16th 06, 01:55 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 15,677
Default What is an ideal heating temp

Guy King wrote:

The message
from The Natural Philosopher contains these words:


Also bolers are more effcient at lower temps I THINK. Not sure ..



They should be. You can't transfer energy so easily into a warm body
from a hot one as you can into a cool body from a hot one.


Also with lower return temps a condensing boiler should be able to
recover more of the latent heat of vaporisation, getting ever closer to
the gross energy content of the gas burnt.

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
 




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