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Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 21st 06, 06:36 PM
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

Hello,

Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past I have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to get the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave and then sliding the flooring underneath. My question is therefore, what is the best way to cut the architrave? Are there any special saws for this or do you just risk getting tons of splinters in your knuckles?!

Also, with regards to beading, I've been advised that the best way of nailing this to the skirting board is to use a nail gun as opposed to using a small hammer as this way you don't end up denting the beading? Any advice?

Any suggestions gratefully received.

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old February 22nd 06, 12:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
shahmonger wrote:

Hello,

Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past I
have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to
get the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave
and then sliding the flooring underneath. My question is therefore,
what is the best way to cut the architrave? Are there any special
saws for this or do you just risk getting tons of splinters in your
knuckles?!


You need a very sharp, flexible hand saw, with fairly fine teeth. Use a
piece of scrap laminate as a guide, sliding the saw over the top of this bit
of scrap - with one hand keeping the cutting bit flat, and the other hand
pulling and pushing on the handle.


Also, with regards to beading, I've been advised that the best way of
nailing this to the skirting board is to use a nail gun as opposed to
using a small hammer as this way you don't end up denting the beading?
Any advice?


Yes, don't use beading at all - it's ultra naff!! Do a *proper* job by
removing the skirting boards, and re-fitting (or replacing) them when the
flooring is down.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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  #3  
Old February 22nd 06, 01:24 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

shahmonger wrote:

Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past I
have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to
get the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave
and then sliding the flooring underneath.


Cutting round architraves is very tedious and very difficult to do well. It
depends if the architrave is proud of the adjacent skirting or flush with
it. If proud, then one of those Japanese style fine tooth pull saws is
excellent. If flush a sharp chisel would be better.

Also, with regards to beading, I've been advised that the best way of
nailing this to the skirting board is to use a nail gun as opposed to
using a small hammer as this way you don't end up denting the beading?


I'd agree a nail gun is a better option - much faster if nothing else. You
can still damage the beading though, unless you use the soft rubber tip
protector. Have you considered a constuction adhesive like No More Nails?
As long as the skirting is flat enough that would be easier.

--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257


  #4  
Old February 22nd 06, 12:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading


wrote in message
oups.com...

Roger Mills (aka Set Square) wrote:
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
shahmonger wrote:

snip


You need a very sharp, flexible hand saw, with fairly fine teeth. Use a
piece of scrap laminate as a guide, sliding the saw over the top of this
bit
of scrap - with one hand keeping the cutting bit flat, and the other hand
pulling and pushing on the handle.


Remember if you're using underlay to include that when cutting the
door. Fortunately I remembered just before we started cutting!

snip

Yes, don't use beading at all - it's ultra naff!! Do a *proper* job by
removing the skirting boards, and re-fitting (or replacing) them when the
flooring is down.


I completely agree, at the time I was grumbling about the extra work,
but I'm so glad I did replace the skirting.


I have toyed with doing this but won't it create more work when eventually
you go back to carpet as there will be a big gap below the skirting?


  #5  
Old February 22nd 06, 12:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: n/a
Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

On Tue, 21 Feb 2006 23:12:23 -0000, "Roger Mills \(aka Set Square\)"
wrote:

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
shahmonger wrote:

Hello,

Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past I
have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to
get the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave
and then sliding the flooring underneath. My question is therefore,
what is the best way to cut the architrave? Are there any special
saws for this or do you just risk getting tons of splinters in your
knuckles?!


You need a very sharp, flexible hand saw, with fairly fine teeth. Use a
piece of scrap laminate as a guide, sliding the saw over the top of this bit
of scrap - with one hand keeping the cutting bit flat, and the other hand
pulling and pushing on the handle.


Also, with regards to beading, I've been advised that the best way of
nailing this to the skirting board is to use a nail gun as opposed to
using a small hammer as this way you don't end up denting the beading?
Any advice?


Yes, don't use beading at all - it's ultra naff!! Do a *proper* job by
removing the skirting boards, and re-fitting (or replacing) them when the
flooring is down.


And if you are removing the skirting why not go all the way and remove
the architraves as well
?
Stuart
  #6  
Old February 22nd 06, 04:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: n/a
Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
No Thanks go@away wrote:


I completely agree, at the time I was grumbling about the extra work,
but I'm so glad I did replace the skirting.


I have toyed with doing this but won't it create more work when
eventually you go back to carpet as there will be a big gap below the
skirting?


Not a problem - you just trim the carpet a bit fuller, and it tucks into the
gap.

I've got something similar in my bedroom, but for a different reason. When I
installed fitted chests of drawers, they had to be levelled to allow for an
uneven floor. There is a skirting-like moulding which I then fitted to the
bottom of the units. In order to look right, this needed to be square and
level with the units rather than with the floor - with the result that there
was a gap of up to 10mm in places. When the carpet was fitted, this went
into the gap and it doesn't show at all.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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  #7  
Old February 22nd 06, 04:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Stuart wrote:

On Tue, 21 Feb 2006 23:12:23 -0000, "Roger Mills \(aka Set Square\)"
wrote:


Yes, don't use beading at all - it's ultra naff!! Do a *proper* job
by removing the skirting boards, and re-fitting (or replacing) them
when the flooring is down.


And if you are removing the skirting why not go all the way and remove
the architraves as well?

Because it's not necessary, and would disturb the decorations. It's not just
the architrave - it's the door frames as well which have to be undercut. You
wouldn't want to remove *them*! Don't forget that the skirting goes back on
a bit higher, thus covering any slight damage to the walls which occurs when
you remove it. The same isn't true for the architraves!

As long as the walls are clear, and accessible for placing and removing
wedges, and for
levering the sections of flooring together, it's no problem to slide the
flooring under small obstacles. I successfully fitted an engineered wooden
floor (similar to laminate to install) in my hall - which has 5 doorways and
a newell post to contend with - using the method I have described.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
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  #8  
Old February 22nd 06, 05:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: n/a
Default Laminate Flooring, Architraves & Beading


"shahmonger" wrote in message
...

Hello,

Am planning on laying a laminate floor this weekend and in the past I
have just cut around the architraves however I've been told that to get
the best finish, it's worth cutting the base of the architrave and then
sliding the flooring underneath.


It's a real pain and be warned that if your house is a few decades old it
could also be very messy, keep the doors closed to try and prevent filth
going round the house. Remove skirtings to lift them, leaving the correct
gap. Be prepared to do some bits of making good in the plaster and perhaps
repairing skirtings, making new plugs and replacing rusty screws or nails.

But, oh, it's well worth it!

Beading round laminate flooring is something I wouldn't have at any cost,
not only does it look awful (and I'm not normally one to bother about such
things) but it stops some furniture from going up to the skirting, thereby
losing some floorspace.

Make the most of the laminate flooring, do a good job (with proper underlay)
and you'll enjoy it.

Mary


 




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