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Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 11th 05, 01:46 PM
Jonathan
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Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?

My gran's old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler went ill when the oil ran out and
crud go into the line, despite the filters. No-one within a 200 mile radius
will service or even look at it.
So, I cleaned out the pipes, cleaned the filters, cleaned the spinner, (
http://www.digitaltoast.co.uk/wilson...flame_90.shtml
) put it back together, and now it works, but it's running too rich and
takes a while to start.

There's a screw to twiddle, but it's a bit more scientific than that, and
apparently I need a flue-gas measuring thing. Can't find one, I've tried
another forum, what do I do??
I think "combustion kit" was the word needed, but I certainly don't want to
pay hundreds for something, when the boiler might be going in 6 months.
But it has to see her through the winter, and it's due to be a bit parky, as
you know!


Ads
  #2  
Old November 11th 05, 04:59 PM
Alec
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Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?

I replaced mine over 18 months ago. If I believe the date on the plate it
was made in '76!!
It used to take ages to cycle round to start until I found there was a
separate un-switched live connection available. Then, after the thermostat
opens the control box continues to cycle to its pre-start position. I think
I found it from the diagram in the control box lid, there is a jumper fitted
where the mains lead connects to the terminal block.

I used to tune mine for flame hight thro the view port.Reduce the air till
the flames are long and sooty, then increase the air till there are still
just yellow tips. If the blue part of the flame is not "sat" on the
removeable baffles then there is too much air and you will get lockouts. The
air is adjusted by rotating the collar around the drive motor.

Every now and again pull the top off the boiler and clean out the fixed
baffles at the top. You may need to replace the glassfibre rope if you do
this.

Rgds
Alec

PS there was a Haynes manual for it. Borrowed it from the local library a
few years ago.........


  #3  
Old November 11th 05, 06:09 PM
John
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Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?


"Jonathan" wrote in message
...
My gran's old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler went ill when the oil ran out
and crud go into the line, despite the filters. No-one within a 200 mile
radius will service or even look at it.


The problem for a pro is the total lack of spares availability. :-(

So, I cleaned out the pipes, cleaned the filters, cleaned the spinner, (
http://www.digitaltoast.co.uk/wilson...flame_90.shtml
) put it back together, and now it works, but it's running too rich and
takes a while to start.


Did you move nay of the adjustment settings? Its quite possible to do all
this and still retain settings/positions. (Not that this will help you now
if you have)


There's a screw to twiddle, but it's a bit more scientific than that, and
apparently I need a flue-gas measuring thing. Can't find one, I've tried
another forum, what do I do??


Oh please! there are a number of screws "to twiddle" the extent of buggering
up depends on which one gets altered.

I think "combustion kit" was the word needed, but I certainly don't want
to pay hundreds for something, when the boiler might be going in 6 months.
But it has to see her through the winter, and it's due to be a bit parky,
as you know!


You have two basic options
1. A chemical analyser kit such as a Fyrite or a Briggon set
2. An electronic combustion analyser set

Neither option is cheap but you may be able to find something on e-bay

In case you or others need to keep one of these dinosaurs running let me say
as a basic premise if one has been running correctly for a number of years
DO NOT ALTER SETTINGS!
The fuel is fed from the tank and "some" tank outlets use a combined
valve/filter/level gauge assembly. This type has a black plastic knob which
incorporates a gauze filter behind the push to operate gauge reading button.
To access this remove the brass stud below the body of the unit which
releases the keeper allowing you to unscrew the knob right out of the body.
A spring loaded plunger shuts off the fluid from the tank much as a
"Supatap" used to allow rewashering without turning the water off.
I assume cleaning methods for other types of seperate filters can be
deduced by anyone willing to engage brain.
There is often a fusible wheelhead firestop valve within the boiler
casing normally behind the BM box flow control device. At the front of the
common BM box is a plate retained by two screws. Undoing these and carefully
easing the plate away avoiding damaging the gasket reveals another filter to
clean. You may also be able to flush the pipe through here catching the oil
in a shallow receptacle.
The casing top is removed exposing the flueway access. Remove this
taking care not to damage the asbestos plate. Remove the baffle assembly and
look down into the combustion chamber. You will see the rotorwhich wll lift
upwards and can be removed. Inspect this and if needed clean the "flinger"
tubes with a pipe-cleaner or similar. Examine the foot bearing and with a
torch inspect the plate it sits on. (If either are worn you have no hope of
renewing them unless you can fabricate your own).
The fuel is flung outwards to impact upon a flame band which has flame
spreaders spaced evenly around it. Study how these are mounted and
positioned. These can be lifted off which allows you to clean the ceramic
hearth and flame band with a vacuum, also the space outside the band. You
will see the ignition arc electrode which should be clean and its tip
located close to the flame band eg about 3 - 5 mm spacing from its target
point. As continuous usage leads to a hole being burnt into the band a
"repair clip" is fitted which is a 20 x 20mm piece of thin low grade
stainless steel. Often a piece of thin asbestos or Fibrefax "wick" is fitted
to help the flame establish more easily.
(One range of Wallflames employed an MICC preheater around the flame
band. When these failed an unusual fault could occur where the flame would
establish, the heater would heat up and the inner element droop to make
contact with the sheath, the ensuing short would cause a false feed into the
control box and it would go to lockout, cool down and reset ok until the
next start.)
The inner (dryside) of the combustion chamber should be swept or scraped
clean and vacuumed up. The front (porthole) removed, the flame sensor and
the viewing window cleaned. Also vacuum accessible flue spaces, then
kneeling down and accessing the "motor" unit underneath the boiler find and
vacuum out the air inlet slots. Do not alter the settings. If you mark the
position it helps to replace as was if you disturb anything.
Replace everything in reverse order, restore fuel supply and switch on.
The preheater switches on, the motor (Fan and flinger) should spin, the
ignition arc operate and fuel be thrown from the rotor to the flame band
where it will hit the hot spot where the arc impinges, ignite and the
ensuing flame spread around the whole of the band forming the characteristic
wall of flame.
Usually at the top front of the shell is a 3/8" stud which is removed
leaving a test sample port exposed. Using the Fyrite smoke pump draw a smoke
sample through the white filter paper and compare the spot with known
comparison spots for a smoke reading (between 0 and 1 Baccharac). Remove the
smoke tester and insert the CO2 tester sample tube, zero the tester. Pump a
sample into the CO2 tester (min 20 strokes) and invert/upright the tester 3
times to give a reading of CO2 % in the flue gases (around 11 or 12% for a
wallflame). Remove and insert a thermometer which will give typically 250 to
350 degreesC
Minor tweaking of the air inlet may be permissible but is very rarely
neccessary or desirable.

If you have altered any settings within the BM box you will need a flow
rate gauge to calibrate the fuel flow. These are very hard to come across
and you will have extreme difficulty in finding anyone still around with
either the unit or the ability to set up the flow rate. One of the major
fuel companies such as Shell may have personnel with the equipment and
expertise. You should contact your local depot


  #4  
Old November 11th 05, 08:19 PM
Jonathan
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Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?

"John" wrote in message
...

"Jonathan" wrote in message
...


So, I cleaned out the pipes, cleaned the filters,


Did you move nay of the adjustment settings?


Bugger....

Oh please! there are a number of screws "to twiddle" the extent of
buggering up depends on which one gets altered.


Bugger...

1. A chemical analyser kit such as a Fyrite or a Briggon set


One Fyrite on ebay currently, $152 US

DO NOT ALTER SETTINGS!


Bugger....

If you have altered any settings within the BM box


Bugger....

you will need a flow rate gauge to calibrate the fuel flow. These are very
hard to come across and you will have extreme difficulty in finding anyone
still around with either the unit or the ability to set up the flow rate.


Bugger bugger bugger....

One of the major fuel companies such as Shell may have personnel with the
equipment and expertise. You should contact your local depot


I think I might just try that. In fact, the only thing I tweaked was to
completely dis-assemble and flush the Kinsgway oil valve with boiling water
and - if you look at the last pic on
http://www.digitaltoast.co.uk/wilson...flame_90.shtml
you'll see the screw and clip that I am having trouble with, as I'm not
entirely sure what they do.

I am very VERY impressed with your in-depth guide - do you mind if I
reproduce it (with acknowledgement) on my Wallflame page? Or I suppose I
could link to the post - either way, it answered a lot of questions I had,
and some I never even thought of!

Oh, and what's the thing to seal oil-carrying pipe connections? I mean,
what's the oil equivelant of ptfe tape and fibre washers?


  #5  
Old November 12th 05, 02:19 PM
John
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Posts: n/a
Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler - where can I get/rent a combustion test kit/flue gas tester?


"Jonathan" wrote in message
...
"John" wrote in message
...

"Jonathan" wrote in message
...


So, I cleaned out the pipes, cleaned the filters,


Did you move any of the adjustment settings?


Bugger....

Oh please! there are a number of screws "to twiddle" the extent of
buggering up depends on which one gets altered.


Bugger...

1. A chemical analyser kit such as a Fyrite or a Briggon set


One Fyrite on ebay currently, $152 US

DO NOT ALTER SETTINGS!


Bugger....

If you have altered any settings within the BM box


Bugger....

you will need a flow rate gauge to calibrate the fuel flow. These are
very hard to come across and you will have extreme difficulty in finding
anyone still around with either the unit or the ability to set up the
flow rate.


Bugger bugger bugger....

One of the major fuel companies such as Shell may have personnel with the
equipment and expertise. You should contact your local depot


I think I might just try that. In fact, the only thing I tweaked was to
completely dis-assemble and flush the Kinsgway oil valve with boiling
water and - if you look at the last pic on
http://www.digitaltoast.co.uk/wilson...flame_90.shtml
you'll see the screw and clip that I am having trouble with, as I'm not
entirely sure what they do.


Your Kingsway oil valve is a variant on the more common BM box. These work
in a similar manner to a carburettor in that they have a float which
operates a valve to maintain a constant level of kerosine in the chamber.
The outlet from the chamber is controlled by a solenoid shut-off when the
unit is not firing but also there is a "needle valve" (Not actually a needle
but the description serves to illustrate the action) which controls the
actual rate of flow. The level of oil in relation to the well below the
rotor is set as is the level in the BM chamber thus interaction with the
needle valve sets the flow rate for combustion. The "needle valve" is
actually shown in your picture of the inside of the oil chamber (next to the
"well". Remove the Aluminium top label which will reveal the cast top of the
box. When fitted in position you can see the actual flow control setting
screw which pushes down onto the "needle" valve to alter the flow rate. The
bent plate is simply a backstop.

To answer your other questions from the photos

The flappy things are flame spreaders, The spark plug is the ignition
electrode which I mentioned previously and should have a gap as specified.
The rectangular plate with a hole in it is a repair clip which should NOT
have a hole in it. You could make a new one with a bit of thin stainless or
simply put a bit of thin steel behind it.
The stipey stuff is Asbestos tape which acts as a wick as I mentioned.
The "plug" conceals a gauze filter


I am very VERY impressed with your in-depth guide - do you mind if I
reproduce it (with acknowledgement) on my Wallflame page? Or I suppose I
could link to the post - either way, it answered a lot of questions I had,
and some I never even thought of!


Use it with pleasure but as it is based on memory it should be treated as
guidance rather than lawg


Oh, and what's the thing to seal oil-carrying pipe connections? I mean,
what's the oil equivelant of ptfe tape and fibre washers?


PTFE works fine if the threads taper and are good, Red Stag is the usual
compound, Fibre washers or annealed copper washers are also fine. Don't get
Stag into the fuel lines before the box


Whereabouts are you located btw?


  #6  
Old December 4th 05, 12:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: n/a
Default Old Wilson Wallflame oil boiler -

"Alec" wrote in message
...
I replaced mine over 18 months ago. If I believe the date on the plate it
was made in '76!!


You seem to be knowledgeable on this, so I have a question: one thing I've
noted is that it seems to be on a lot of the time for hot water, even though
she doesn't use much, and the oil bills are huge. The system is: indirect
gravity fed cylinder, the temperature seems to be regulated at the boiler
end, which is always on, and only the CH is on a clock.
Therefore, will all the inefficiencies and losses of a gravity fed system
with no electro-thingumy valves, of course the boiler is thinking that it's
time to heat the water again.

SO....I was thinking that rather than do anything complex and maybe break
something, and what with a possibly very cold winter approaching, I'd see
the CH clock in the boiler to be just on all the time, BUT put a clock on
the main boiler power feed, with it coming on say early morn, mid afternoon,
evening, and about 2-3am.
That way, the boiler will always have something to heat, be it water or CH.
Can anyone see a problem with this?


 




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