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UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!



 
 
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  #21  
Old November 11th 05, 08:16 PM
Lurch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!

On or around Fri, 11 Nov 2005 18:28:43 +0000 (UTC), "powerstation"
mused:


"Lurch" wrote in message
.. .
On or around Fri, 11 Nov 2005 16:25:38 +0000 (UTC), "powerstation"
mused:



Bizzarre or what? Anyone able to shed any light on this?

I've only fitted one gas oven and I used a flexible connection that was

a
few years back. However I do note that the safety guidelines as found

in
some recent (2005) gas fitting texts state that rigid pipework is to be
used.

The only way I can think this might be achievable is to make the
service isolator accessible in an adjacent cupboard (say). Then make a
compression joint behind the oven accessible from an adjacent cupboard.
Thus the pipe can be disconnected and the oven removed.

I really need more info why the flexible hose is not permitted here.

Temperature

Nope. If it got that hot around the oven then surely the worktops and
adjecant units would have to be of some non-flammable construction.

--

But if the hose comes into contact with the hot rear metalwork of the oven
it can exceed the rated temperature of the Gas hose. I am Corgi registered
and fit the appliance's strictly as per the installation instructions, as
required by the GAUR.

The rear of the oven shouldn't get that hot though. Is the above a
guess or is that a statement of fact?
--
| Stuart @ SJW Electrical. Please Reply to group. |
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  #23  
Old November 12th 05, 08:32 AM
powerstation
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!


"Lurch" wrote in message
...
On or around Fri, 11 Nov 2005 18:28:43 +0000 (UTC), "powerstation"
mused:


"Lurch" wrote in message
.. .
On or around Fri, 11 Nov 2005 16:25:38 +0000 (UTC), "powerstation"
mused:



Bizzarre or what? Anyone able to shed any light on this?

I've only fitted one gas oven and I used a flexible connection that

was
a
few years back. However I do note that the safety guidelines as

found
in
some recent (2005) gas fitting texts state that rigid pipework is to

be
used.

The only way I can think this might be achievable is to make the
service isolator accessible in an adjacent cupboard (say). Then make

a
compression joint behind the oven accessible from an adjacent

cupboard.
Thus the pipe can be disconnected and the oven removed.

I really need more info why the flexible hose is not permitted here.

Temperature

Nope. If it got that hot around the oven then surely the worktops and
adjecant units would have to be of some non-flammable construction.

--

But if the hose comes into contact with the hot rear metalwork of the

oven
it can exceed the rated temperature of the Gas hose. I am Corgi

registered
and fit the appliance's strictly as per the installation instructions, as
required by the GAUR.

The rear of the oven shouldn't get that hot though. Is the above a
guess or is that a statement of fact?
--

FACT The regulations state the hose should not come into contact with hot
surfaces or exceed its temperature limit, that is fact. "The rear of the
oven shouldn't get that hot though" that IS a guess isn't it ? Have you got
access to the manufactures test data, are you prepared to leave it on full
heat for hours in the summer, then measure it, if not you must follow their
installation instructions, which do not permit the use of a flexible gas
hose, period.


  #24  
Old November 12th 05, 01:35 PM
John
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Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!


"Lurch" wrote in message
...
On or around Fri, 11 Nov 2005 18:24:35 +0000 (UTC), "John"
mused:

I really need more info why the flexible hose is not permitted here.

Temperature

Nope. If it got that hot around the oven then surely the worktops and
adjecant units would have to be of some non-flammable construction.


IIRC solid piping was required for some commercial catering equipment to
prevent things being moved out from under flue hoods where applicable. I
wonder if this is based on the same logic.

Doubt it as it's a built in oven which doesn't require any extraction
and the required kitchen extraction isn't required by CORGI so it has
nothing to do with gas ovens. Even if there was extraction in the
kitchen it isn't neccesarily over the oven.


I'm thinking along the lines of a wood/chipboard top to the unit possibly
with a gap at rear. Moving the oven forward "might" result in the heat from
the oven vent being under the top, unless the vent is hidden in a grille at
the front.
As many kitchen units are fully enclosed at the rear presumably any
manufacturer will have been asked this point before and maybe a question to
them might be better than asking us to guess from here.


  #26  
Old November 12th 05, 02:00 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!

In article ,
powerstation wrote:
Nope. If it got that hot around the oven then surely the worktops and
adjecant units would have to be of some non-flammable construction.


But if the hose comes into contact with the hot rear metalwork of the
oven it can exceed the rated temperature of the Gas hose. I am Corgi
registered and fit the appliance's strictly as per the installation
instructions, as required by the GAUR.


So are you saying the insulation on a built in oven is poorer than on a
freestanding cooker where a flexible connection is allowed?

--
*Age is a very high price to pay for maturity.

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #27  
Old November 12th 05, 02:32 PM
powerstation
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!


"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in message
...
In article ,
powerstation wrote:
Nope. If it got that hot around the oven then surely the worktops and
adjecant units would have to be of some non-flammable construction.


But if the hose comes into contact with the hot rear metalwork of the
oven it can exceed the rated temperature of the Gas hose. I am Corgi
registered and fit the appliance's strictly as per the installation
instructions, as required by the GAUR.


So are you saying the insulation on a built in oven is poorer than on a
freestanding cooker where a flexible connection is allowed?

--

I am saying the connection must be made in accordance with the instructions
supplied, this is why no new gas appliance (or second hand) can be installed
by law without installation instructions being available to the installer,
simple as that. New free standing appliances normally have measurements for
position for the bayonet on the wall, so that the hose hangs in a specific
place on the rear away from the hottest parts of the appliance and so as not
to touch the floor when the appliance is in place. This wouldn't be
possible with an oven because you cannot see it with the oven in place.


  #30  
Old November 13th 05, 02:18 PM
Lurch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gas oven - flexible gas pipe NOT allowed!

On or around Sat, 12 Nov 2005 21:47:59 +0000 (UTC), "John"
mused:

IIRC solid piping was required for some commercial catering equipment
to
prevent things being moved out from under flue hoods where applicable.

I'd have thought that screwing it to the floor would have been a better
solution.

What about things not sitting on a floor?

They must be fitted to something, I haven't seen a levitating cooking
appliance yet, domestic or commercial.


Immediately to mind I have seen water boilers and freestanding grills
positioned on top of stainless steel catering kitchen furniture (table type
worktops) with a vent hood above and piped in rigid pipe so no-one could
slide them around and end up not under the hood. Just because you haven't
seen it doesn't mean it isn't so:-)

Then it is attached to something then isn't it. Just because it isn't
on the floor doesn't mean it can't be fixed down.

Also, I can't believe that anyone would connect a rigid supply pipe to
a non-fixed piece of equipment.

This thread is getting dafter by the minute.
--
| Stuart @ SJW Electrical. Please Reply to group. |
 




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