A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » UK diy
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Gravity Fed Oil Pump?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 30th 05, 05:56 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gravity Fed Oil Pump?

Our oil tank used to sit up high on concrete blocks, however we were
recently advised by the man who serviced our boiler that we could
happily site the oil tank on the floor and the boiler would pull the
oil through. This we have done - we were having some ladnscaping done
and took the opportunity to move it slightly and put it on slabs - this
was done by the landscapers.

I have just tried to bleed the boiler (something I have done before
myself) but with no success. I phoned another heating engineer who
told me that my boiler must be gravity fed and the tank shouldn't sit
on the floor - I'm inclined to agree with him and think I was badly
advised first time.

My boiler is a trianco and the burner is Riello/RBL.

The new chap is suggesting putting in a different burner as you cannot
fit a different pump to the burner I've got. He can fit a recon one
for =A3200. This seems fair to me and I think is what I'm going to go
for.

I would be grateful for opinions on this in case I am being badly
advised again. I could go and argue the toss with the original man who
advised me in the first place, but I don't think I will have a leg to
stand on.

Ads
  #2  
Old September 30th 05, 06:08 PM
Grunff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:
Our oil tank used to sit up high on concrete blocks, however we were
recently advised by the man who serviced our boiler that we could
happily site the oil tank on the floor and the boiler would pull the
oil through. This we have done - we were having some ladnscaping done
and took the opportunity to move it slightly and put it on slabs - this
was done by the landscapers.

I have just tried to bleed the boiler (something I have done before
myself) but with no success. I phoned another heating engineer who
told me that my boiler must be gravity fed and the tank shouldn't sit
on the floor - I'm inclined to agree with him and think I was badly
advised first time.

My boiler is a trianco and the burner is Riello/RBL.

The new chap is suggesting putting in a different burner as you cannot
fit a different pump to the burner I've got. He can fit a recon one
for 200. This seems fair to me and I think is what I'm going to go
for.

I would be grateful for opinions on this in case I am being badly
advised again. I could go and argue the toss with the original man who
advised me in the first place, but I don't think I will have a leg to
stand on.



You can have the tank at the same level or lower than the pump, provided
that:

1. The pump generates sufficient suction

2. You install a tiger loop in the oil line
http://www.toolstation.com/search.html?searchstr=tiger+loop


Installing a new pump is only half the answer.


--
Grunff
  #3  
Old September 30th 05, 06:34 PM
John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
ups.com...
Our oil tank used to sit up high on concrete blocks, however we were
recently advised by the man who serviced our boiler that we could
happily site the oil tank on the floor and the boiler would pull the
oil through. This we have done - we were having some ladnscaping done
and took the opportunity to move it slightly and put it on slabs - this
was done by the landscapers.


An indication of the relative levels before and after also the length of
pipe and size would enable us to get an idea of what is involved. Also
whether the tank is empty or full or somewhere between.

I have just tried to bleed the boiler (something I have done before
myself) but with no success. I phoned another heating engineer who
told me that my boiler must be gravity fed and the tank shouldn't sit
on the floor - I'm inclined to agree with him and think I was badly
advised first time.

Maybe but there are a hell of a lot of chancers out there. I get very
depressed by the state of some of the "jobs" I come across, supposedly
installed by professionals. Most of the problems can be readily overcome by
simple application of o level physics but this is apparently beyond some
installers.

My boiler is a trianco and the burner is Riello/RBL.

Nothing wrong with either of those.

The new chap is suggesting putting in a different burner as you cannot
fit a different pump to the burner I've got. He can fit a recon one
for 200. This seems fair to me and I think is what I'm going to go
for.

Hes a chancer trying to take money from your pocket and pout it into his!
forget it and look at the problem from an engineering viewpoint.

I would be grateful for opinions on this in case I am being badly
advised again. I could go and argue the toss with the original man who
advised me in the first place, but I don't think I will have a leg to
stand on.

Assuming your tank fuel level is above the burner the pump should prime if
the pipe is not blocked or kinked. You could find a problem if it is
restricted by kink or its size/length but without the info I asked for first
its not possible to say with confidence. If the tank fuel level is below the
burner it will not self prime and you will need to intervene manually to
achieve priming. In extreme cases it might be neccessary to employ a
dearator device but give me the info first.

BTW where are you located?

John


  #4  
Old September 30th 05, 06:47 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Oil tank is about 1/3 full - the tank is now probably lower than
the pump - the oil is definitely not coming through of it's own accord
so the level could be below the pump. The pipe is about 35 metres of
10mm copper.

The pipe runs from the tank, down underground, along, then up, along a
bit and down, then along again underground until it rises at the
boiler.

I have tried waiting for gravity to push the oil through (taken the
pipe off the pump) and also tried sucking it through - this seems to
get the oil through the pip, but it drops back again.

The boiler and burner will probably be inexcess of 20 years old.

I'm in Norfolk

cheers

Jeremy

  #5  
Old September 30th 05, 06:47 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Oil tank is about 1/3 full - the tank is now probably lower than
the pump - the oil is definitely not coming through of it's own accord
so the level could be below the pump. The pipe is about 35 metres of
10mm copper.

The pipe runs from the tank, down underground, along, then up, along a
bit and down, then along again underground until it rises at the
boiler.

I have tried waiting for gravity to push the oil through (taken the
pipe off the pump) and also tried sucking it through - this seems to
get the oil through the pip, but it drops back again.

The boiler and burner will probably be inexcess of 20 years old.

I'm in Norfolk

cheers

Jeremy

  #7  
Old September 30th 05, 07:15 PM
Grunff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Might it not be possible to fit a second small tank at a higher level
and then pump the oil into that first using an automatic level switch to
control a pump?



But why on earth would you do that? That's crazy...


--
Grunff
  #8  
Old September 30th 05, 07:17 PM
Harry Bloomfield
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Grunff presented the following explanation :
Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Might it not be possible to fit a second small tank at a higher level and
then pump the oil into that first using an automatic level switch to
control a pump?



But why on earth would you do that? That's crazy...


When looking for a solution, all possible options should be considered.

--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.org


  #9  
Old September 30th 05, 07:17 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Is the oil tanked vented OK.

Remember the principle of the open ended 'U' tube.

Chris.

  #10  
Old September 30th 05, 07:41 PM
Grunff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Harry Bloomfield wrote:

When looking for a solution, all possible options should be considered.



Not stupid ones, no.


--
Grunff
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Several things wrong with new flat - no central heating, low hot water pressure even with water pump, noisey pump kiich UK diy 69 July 13th 05 07:36 PM
Silent central heating pump? David Hearn UK diy 10 June 1st 05 09:35 PM
Central Heating Pumps, and Pump Ball Valves Mike Dodd UK diy 9 April 28th 05 01:11 AM
Am I diagnosing this well pump problem right? If so, buying new pump in am. BobN Home Repair 6 April 26th 05 04:09 PM
Water Pump / Pressure Tank Problem !!!!!! James Nipper Home Repair 9 June 28th 04 02:13 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.