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Compression vs. push-fit fittings?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 12th 05, 11:33 PM
al
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Default Compression vs. push-fit fittings?

In locations where one may not want to use a hot torch (like 5cm from the
main gas pipe!), which is considered the more reliable joining method? What
are the pro's/con's of each? I've used compression, but never push-fit.

Talking about 15mm copper piping for hot water (rads) if that makes any
difference.



a


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  #2  
Old April 13th 05, 11:41 AM
Andy Hall
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Default

On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 22:33:06 GMT, "al"
wrote:

In locations where one may not want to use a hot torch (like 5cm from the
main gas pipe!), which is considered the more reliable joining method? What
are the pro's/con's of each? I've used compression, but never push-fit.

Talking about 15mm copper piping for hot water (rads) if that makes any
difference.


Push fit fittings work perfectly well provided that you follow
manufacturer instructions. This means that tube ends must be square
and clean. If you are using plastic pipe, use the proper cutting
tool. If you are using copper, then a tubing cutter. On no account
use a hacksaw.

If you feel more comfortable with compression, then fine, but both are
perfectly suitable.



--

..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  #3  
Old April 13th 05, 11:57 AM
Doctor Evil
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Default


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 22:33:06 GMT, "al"
wrote:

In locations where one may not want to
use a hot torch (like 5cm from the
main gas pipe!), which is considered
the more reliable joining method? What
are the pro's/con's of each? I've used
compression, but never push-fit.

Talking about 15mm copper piping
for hot water (rads) if that makes any
difference.


Push fit fittings work perfectly well
provided that you follow manufacturer
instructions. This means that tube
ends must be square and clean. If
you are using plastic pipe, use the
proper cutting tool. If you are using
copper, then a tubing cutter. On no
account use a hacksaw.


...Lord Hall informs us all with tripe
...hacksaws are used on copper pipe
...you place the saw on pipe in view
...and pull and push until it's through



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  #4  
Old April 13th 05, 12:16 PM
Fred
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 22:33:06 GMT, "al"
wrote:

In locations where one may not want to use a hot torch (like 5cm from the
main gas pipe!), which is considered the more reliable joining method?

What
are the pro's/con's of each? I've used compression, but never push-fit.

Talking about 15mm copper piping for hot water (rads) if that makes any
difference.


Push fit fittings work perfectly well provided that you follow
manufacturer instructions. This means that tube ends must be square
and clean. If you are using plastic pipe, use the proper cutting
tool. If you are using copper, then a tubing cutter. On no account
use a hacksaw.

If you feel more comfortable with compression, then fine, but both are
perfectly suitable.




I've done quite a lot of plumbing in my time but not in the last few years.
Am I correct in saying the push-fit variety have a rubber seal in them.
What's the life expectancy of this seal, just that a compression fitting
with a brass olive sounds a far more permanent solution.


  #5  
Old April 13th 05, 01:13 PM
Andy Hall
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Default

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 12:16:40 +0100, "Fred" wrote:




I've done quite a lot of plumbing in my time but not in the last few years.
Am I correct in saying the push-fit variety have a rubber seal in them.
What's the life expectancy of this seal, just that a compression fitting
with a brass olive sounds a far more permanent solution.


There is usually an O-ring seal made from EPDM, which is a synthetic
rubber.

http://www.azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=1822

Fittings manufacturers guarantee their products for a minimum of 25
years.

http://www.yorkshirefittings.co.uk/d...ks/tectite.pdf



--

..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  #6  
Old April 13th 05, 01:31 PM
AlexW
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Default

Andy Hall wrote:
On no account
use a hacksaw.


This /golden rule/ was broken by our plumber (we call him "hamfist").

Over a year later we sprouted 2 leaks due to the O rings eventually
failing, presumably due to nicks introduced by the burrs on the pipe ends.

The rest of his work only just avoided the best bodges thread.

HTH

Alex.
  #7  
Old April 13th 05, 01:44 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
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Default

In article ,
Doctor Evil wrote:
Push fit fittings work perfectly well
provided that you follow manufacturer
instructions. This means that tube
ends must be square and clean. If
you are using plastic pipe, use the
proper cutting tool. If you are using
copper, then a tubing cutter. On no
account use a hacksaw.


..Lord Hall informs us all with tripe
..hacksaws are used on copper pipe
..you place the saw on pipe in view
..and pull and push until it's through


Using a proper tube cutter produces a slightly 'rolled over' end in copper
tube - ideal for the smooth and damage free entry to a rubber seal.

I'm surprised one of your claimed experience hasn't noticed this? Perhaps
a visit to Specsavers is needed. They advertise heavily so you must know
about them?

--
*If a turtle doesn't have a shell, is he homeless or naked?

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #8  
Old April 13th 05, 01:48 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
AlexW wrote:
On no account use a hacksaw.


This /golden rule/ was broken by our plumber (we call him "hamfist").


Over a year later we sprouted 2 leaks due to the O rings eventually
failing, presumably due to nicks introduced by the burrs on the pipe
ends.


The rest of his work only just avoided the best bodges thread.


I really can't understand a pro - or anyone plumbing for money - not using
the correct tube cutter. They're hardly expensive, and save time too,
apart from giving the cut required.

Of course bar room experts like IMM or Drivel will always think they know
better.

--
*A woman drove me to drink and I didn't have the decency to thank her

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #9  
Old April 13th 05, 02:11 PM
Andy Hall
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 11:57:28 +0100, "Doctor Evil"
wrote:


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 22:33:06 GMT, "al"
wrote:

In locations where one may not want to
use a hot torch (like 5cm from the
main gas pipe!), which is considered
the more reliable joining method? What
are the pro's/con's of each? I've used
compression, but never push-fit.

Talking about 15mm copper piping
for hot water (rads) if that makes any
difference.


Push fit fittings work perfectly well
provided that you follow manufacturer
instructions. This means that tube
ends must be square and clean. If
you are using plastic pipe, use the
proper cutting tool. If you are using
copper, then a tubing cutter. On no
account use a hacksaw.


..Lord Hall informs us all with tripe
..hacksaws are used on copper pipe
..you place the saw on pipe in view
..and pull and push until it's through


Not reading instructions and using hacksaw
with effect that the water ****es onto the floor..

BTW. What's this new "poetry" stuff?
Do you see yourself as the next Andrew Motion?

I know that most of what you write could be described as "motion", but
this is a new departure.



--

..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  #10  
Old April 13th 05, 02:20 PM
Dave Plowman (News)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Andy Hall wrote:
BTW. What's this new "poetry" stuff?


Glad you put poetry in parenthesis...

Do you see yourself as the next Andrew Motion?


I know that most of what you write could be described as "motion", but
this is a new departure.


I'd suspect a new medication. Perhaps they'll get the dose right soon.

--
*Bigamy is having one wife too many - monogamy is the same

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
 




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