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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

leather belt splice



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 28th 04, 04:31 PM
William R. Hopcraft
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Default leather belt splice

I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type of
glue to use. Any suggestions?


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  #2  
Old August 28th 04, 05:32 PM
Don Bruder
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In article FG0Yc.8260$tI.7906@trndny04,
"William R. Hopcraft" wrote:

I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type of
glue to use. Any suggestions?


Speaking as a part-time leatherworker...

Waxed cotton thread. Seriously. A glued joint is likely to be too
brittle to hold for long - I wouldn't be overly surprised if it exploded
the first time the joint crosses a radius smaller than about twice the
length of the lapped section.

Avoid synthetics, as they'll tend to be "slippy", particularly if they
manage to stop on a small pulley. And as an added bonus, if that pulley
happens to be the drive, you'll be re-stitching your splice in no time
'cause of the thread melting and letting go. Stick with waxed cotton.

Skive it down to a good long taper (at least 2-3 times the width of the
belt long) on each end on both sides of the joint - one side skived on
the "inside", the other on the "outside" surface - lay 'em up as a lap
joint, and put in at least two, more if you've got the width for it,
lines of stitching that run parallel to the edges, and at least the full
length of the spliced zone plus a couple inches on either end. "Sink"
each stitch (Try to pull it below the belt's surface, and/or stitch into
a shallow groove you've pre-cut on the inside of the loop) and when
you're done, if you've got the room to get the loop open far enough (or
turn it "inside out"), open it up, inside facing you, lay it across your
anvil (I presume you've got one... if not find/use a similar surface) on
top of a *wrung almost dry* piece of cloth, and use a fairly light
rawhide, wood, or plastic mallet to pound the bejeebers out of it. Not
so hard you thin out or split the leather, but hard enough to "seat" the
lap against itself.

*SLIGHTLY* loose stitiching is a good thing in this case, as it will
give the lap a bit more flexibility to pass the pulleys without
"thumping" - A super-tight stitch will produce a lap with less ability
to conform to the shape of the pulley, so instead of travelling smoothly
around, it will tend to either "stick" or "slip", depending on how rigid
it ends up being. Both cases will give you a "thump" and/or erratic
"grab-slip" misbehavior as the joint crosses a pulley.

--
Don Bruder - - New Email policy in effect as of Feb. 21, 2004.
Short form: I'm trashing EVERY E-mail that doesn't contain a password in the
subject unless it comes from a "whitelisted" (pre-approved by me) address.
See http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd/main/contact.html for full details.
  #3  
Old August 28th 04, 05:50 PM
Paul K. Dickman
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The best stuff is a contact adhesive called Barge Cement.

This is the stuff shoemakers use to glue new soles on and it is seriously
tough stuff.

I've tried some other brands of contact adhesives with less than stellar
results.
(not to say that some brand isn't as good, just that the ones I used
weren't.)

In a pinch, I used some Gorilla Glue. It is a foaming polyurethane glue sold
to woodworkers.
I wiped a very, very thin layer on both sides of the skive and clamped the
joint over night.

That was a couple years ago, and there is no sign of failing.

Paul K. Dickman

William R. Hopcraft wrote in message ...
I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type

of
glue to use. Any suggestions?




  #4  
Old August 29th 04, 12:40 AM
jim rozen
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In article , Don Bruder says...

Waxed cotton thread. Seriously. A glued joint is likely to be too
brittle to hold for long - I wouldn't be overly surprised if it exploded
the first time the joint crosses a radius smaller than about twice the
length of the lapped section.


This is news to the belt manufacturers - how do you think they
get belting in lengths bigger than one cow unit long? They
glue the skived joints.

Leather belt cement used to be sold by McMaster Carr, and that's
what I've always used on my SB machines. The barge cement is
supposedly also available at shoemaker's stores and is reported
to perform fine.

Jim


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  #5  
Old August 29th 04, 12:54 PM
Terry McCreary
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"William R. Hopcraft" wrote in message news:FG0Yc.8260$tI.7906@trndny04...
I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type of
glue to use. Any suggestions?


William:

I was in the same situation, and finally opted to buy a new,
reasonably-priced belt with a metal splice (textile composite belt,
pin-and-loop splice) from Kyle McGowan. His website is at
http://home.earthlink.net/~ninenines/index.html. Email at the address
given on the website for a quote.

Shipping time was a bit long, but the belt has done a fine job on my
SB 14".

Best regards -- terry
  #6  
Old August 29th 04, 04:31 PM
Robert Swinney
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Jim has the same question as I -- if skived and glued is not good, why has
it been used for so long? On the other hand, Don's stitching instructions
were quite clear but seem to be bit of trouble if there is another way.

Bob Swinney
"jim rozen" wrote in message
...
In article , Don Bruder says...

Waxed cotton thread. Seriously. A glued joint is likely to be too
brittle to hold for long - I wouldn't be overly surprised if it exploded
the first time the joint crosses a radius smaller than about twice the
length of the lapped section.


This is news to the belt manufacturers - how do you think they
get belting in lengths bigger than one cow unit long? They
glue the skived joints.

Leather belt cement used to be sold by McMaster Carr, and that's
what I've always used on my SB machines. The barge cement is
supposedly also available at shoemaker's stores and is reported
to perform fine.

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================



  #7  
Old August 29th 04, 08:33 PM
Larry Jaques
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On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 09:31:06 -0500, "Robert Swinney"
calmly ranted:

Jim has the same question as I -- if skived and glued is not good, why has
it been used for so long? On the other hand, Don's stitching instructions
were quite clear but seem to be bit of trouble if there is another way.


Why use a chipped piece of flat rock when knives are available?
Do you make you own soap, detergent, toothpaste, etc?

One problem with hide glue is temperature. It's intolerant.

Shoe Goo, E6000, etc. are all great sticky stuffs.

--
"I'm sick and tired of having to rearrange my life
because of what the STUPIDEST people *might* do or
how they *might* react."
-- Bill Maher

  #8  
Old August 29th 04, 10:16 PM
Errol Groff
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What I have always wonderd is, if they make glue from horses how do
they tell ahead of time which are the sticky ones?

Errol Groff
  #9  
Old August 29th 04, 10:55 PM
Jerry J. Wass
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I kinda thought animal product to animal product---Hide Glue??--ya know, the
stuff
they make by boiling hides,hoofs,horns,etc...

"William R. Hopcraft" wrote:

I've got to replace the leather drive belt on my old South Bend lathe. I
want to use a skived glue joint for the splice, but am not sure what type of
glue to use. Any suggestions?


  #10  
Old August 30th 04, 12:55 AM
Gunner
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On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 20:16:53 GMT, Errol Groff
wrote:


What I have always wonderd is, if they make glue from horses how do
they tell ahead of time which are the sticky ones?

Errol Groff


Thanks Errol....

Gunner, wiping potato chips and Mt. Dew off his monitor....



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Eventually she will succeed, perhaps with the help of your fellow man.

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