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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

castting



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 20th 17, 10:41 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Thank Mr. Tim Wescotti ....research and read more papers ...but some of problem in practice or some things can not be includedcan in papers
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  #12  
Old April 20th 17, 10:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Thank Mr.Ed Huntress ...I read that and your words very true but I need some one who is expert in casting in the workshops because in practice the melt and cast very difficult
  #13  
Old April 20th 17, 11:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 278
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On Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 5:50:33 PM UTC-4, Asaad Kadhem wrote:
Thank Mr.Ed Huntress ...I read that and your words very true but I need some one who is expert in casting in the workshops because in practice the melt and cast very difficult


This is more complicated than you're reading here. For over 100 years, they've made copper/chromium alloys by melting, but they achieved only about 0.5% chrome that way. Higher alloys, up to 10%, have been achieved by aluminothermic reaction (like thermite).

You need the papers. Don't assume you can just dissolve chromium into molten copper and come up with a 1.5% alloy.

--
Ed Huntress
  #14  
Old April 21st 17, 01:08 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:50:28 -0700 (PDT), Asaad Kadhem
wrote:

Thank Mr.Ed Huntress ...I read that and your words very true but I need some one who is expert in casting in the workshops because in practice the melt and cast very difficult

Greetings Asaad,
An expert in casting will not be able to give you the advice you need
on this newsgroup because there is too much information to type. So
you really need to get a book aboput casting. Since you are totally
new to this I think a book written so for folks like you would be
best. One that has the casting basics but also enough information so
that as you get more experience there will also be information you can
use. So try this book. "The Complete Metalsmith" by Tim McCreight. The
book covers many aspects of metalsmithing which you may find
interesting but the section on casting is really good for beginners.
It tells you about various fluxes, why they are needed, how they work,
and how to use them. You will need to know this to do the casting you
want to do. The book also covers heat sources and crucibles. I hope
you learn something that you can tell us all about.
Cheers,
Eric
  #15  
Old April 21st 17, 01:45 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 278
Default castting

On Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 8:07:31 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:50:28 -0700 (PDT), Asaad Kadhem
wrote:

Thank Mr.Ed Huntress ...I read that and your words very true but I need some one who is expert in casting in the workshops because in practice the melt and cast very difficult

Greetings Asaad,
An expert in casting will not be able to give you the advice you need
on this newsgroup because there is too much information to type. So
you really need to get a book aboput casting. Since you are totally
new to this I think a book written so for folks like you would be
best. One that has the casting basics but also enough information so
that as you get more experience there will also be information you can
use. So try this book. "The Complete Metalsmith" by Tim McCreight. The
book covers many aspects of metalsmithing which you may find
interesting but the section on casting is really good for beginners.
It tells you about various fluxes, why they are needed, how they work,
and how to use them. You will need to know this to do the casting you
want to do. The book also covers heat sources and crucibles. I hope
you learn something that you can tell us all about.
Cheers,
Eric


That's good advice -- he really needs to know which questions to ask -- but, as one who covered materials, including casting, in the metalworking press for 40 years, I would be very surprised if he finds answers to his specific questions in any ordinary casting book.

I doubt if chromium/copper alloys are cooked up in any ordinary casting operation. It's a specialty and the only people who are likely to know about it are well-educated casting engineers. Finding one working in a foundry who can talk authoritatively about site-mixed chrome/copper (plus aluminum) is something I wouldn't even try.

When I had to answer arcane questions like that, I'd go straight to the associations who know the highest-level engineers in the field I'm inquiring about. They're geared toward educating people about their industry; they're usually very helpful at connecting you with the people who are most likely to know.

In this case, the two organizations I'd try would be ASM International (formerly the American Society for Metals), and the ICA (the International Copper Association). Here are their websites:

http://copperalliance.org/

http://www.asminternational.org/web/guest/home

Like most industry associations, they have staff that deals with the press, so I always had an easy way in. But they're also geared toward helping students and educational institutions. They're the most likely places to reach someone who really knows the answers.

--
Ed Huntress
  #16  
Old April 21st 17, 02:39 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,609
Default castting

On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:45:09 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 8:07:31 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:50:28 -0700 (PDT), Asaad Kadhem
wrote:

Thank Mr.Ed Huntress ...I read that and your words very true but I need some one who is expert in casting in the workshops because in practice the melt and cast very difficult

Greetings Asaad,
An expert in casting will not be able to give you the advice you need
on this newsgroup because there is too much information to type. So
you really need to get a book aboput casting. Since you are totally
new to this I think a book written so for folks like you would be
best. One that has the casting basics but also enough information so
that as you get more experience there will also be information you can
use. So try this book. "The Complete Metalsmith" by Tim McCreight. The
book covers many aspects of metalsmithing which you may find
interesting but the section on casting is really good for beginners.
It tells you about various fluxes, why they are needed, how they work,
and how to use them. You will need to know this to do the casting you
want to do. The book also covers heat sources and crucibles. I hope
you learn something that you can tell us all about.
Cheers,
Eric


That's good advice -- he really needs to know which questions to ask -- but, as one who covered materials, including casting, in the metalworking press for 40 years, I would be very surprised if he finds answers to his specific questions in any ordinary casting book.

I doubt if chromium/copper alloys are cooked up in any ordinary casting operation. It's a specialty and the only people who are likely to know about it are well-educated casting engineers. Finding one working in a foundry who can talk authoritatively about site-mixed chrome/copper (plus aluminum) is something I wouldn't even try.

When I had to answer arcane questions like that, I'd go straight to the associations who know the highest-level engineers in the field I'm inquiring about. They're geared toward educating people about their industry; they're usually very helpful at connecting you with the people who are most likely to know.

In this case, the two organizations I'd try would be ASM International (formerly the American Society for Metals), and the ICA (the International Copper Association). Here are their websites:

http://copperalliance.org/

http://www.asminternational.org/web/guest/home

Like most industry associations, they have staff that deals with the press, so I always had an easy way in. But they're also geared toward helping students and educational institutions. They're the most likely places to reach someone who really knows the answers.

I figger before he can start experimenting with new alloys he needs to
understand the fundamentals of melting and casting small ingots. Once
he has that down pat he can start to experiment. Of prime importance
is the heat source, type of crucible material, and how to avoid
oxidation of the melt. No matter which course he decides to take he is
gonna need to do lots of reading. The links you posted will be a good
start in the reading dept.
Eric
  #17  
Old April 21st 17, 03:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,887
Default castting

On Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 9:37:56 PM UTC-4, wrote:

I figger before he can start experimenting with new alloys he needs to
understand the fundamentals of melting and casting small ingots. Once
he has that down pat he can start to experiment. Of prime importance
is the heat source, type of crucible material, and how to avoid
oxidation of the melt. No matter which course he decides to take he is
gonna need to do lots of reading. The links you posted will be a good
start in the reading dept.
Eric


That would depend very much on whether his research is theoretical or practical. I hope it is both.
 




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