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Tom Del Rosso[_4_] August 14th 11 07:38 PM

Friction welding
 

Is this an acceptable process?

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less of
a jolt.


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Jon Elson August 14th 11 09:28 PM

Friction welding
 
Tom Del Rosso wrote:


Is this an acceptable process?

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less
of a jolt.


Friction stir welding is a well-accepted process used to make axles and
driveshafts on auto parts. It may be a bit rough on standard lathes, but
the machines built for the purpose take it day in and day out.

Jon

Joseph Gwinn August 14th 11 09:54 PM

Friction welding
 
In article ,
"Tom Del Rosso" wrote:

Is this an acceptable process?

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less of
a jolt.


I thing the friction welder stopped as it was programmed to stop, not
that it was stalled by the workpiece. That machine is not a lathe,
despite the chuck. It appears to be a direct drive friction welder.

Joe Gwinn

Lloyd E. Sponenburgh[_3_] August 14th 11 10:25 PM

Friction welding
 
Joseph Gwinn fired this volley in news:joegwinn-
:

I thing the friction welder stopped as it was programmed to stop, not
that it was stalled by the workpiece. That machine is not a lathe,
despite the chuck. It appears to be a direct drive friction welder.



Who _didn't_ hear the contactor cut out when the weld was finished?

That was not a stall; no, not at all.

LLoyd

Stuart Wheaton August 14th 11 11:16 PM

Friction welding
 
On 8/14/2011 4:28 PM, Jon Elson wrote:
Tom Del Rosso wrote:


Is this an acceptable process?

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less
of a jolt.


Friction stir welding is a well-accepted process used to make axles and
driveshafts on auto parts. It may be a bit rough on standard lathes, but
the machines built for the purpose take it day in and day out.

Jon


Friction stir welding is a different process. It uses a tool akin to a
router to force a smooth bit along a flat butt joint between two
aluminum sheets effectively stirring the two sheets together. Used in
aerospace and similar work.


David R. Birch August 15th 11 12:14 AM

Friction welding
 
On 8/14/2011 1:38 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Is this an acceptable process?


Yes, a company I worked for had a friction welding division and that's
how they did it.

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less of
a jolt.


The machine is not a lathe. The headstock is similar, the tail stock
pushes one half of the piece under enormous pressure against the other
half. The weld slag at the junction can be a bitch to remove.

David

Lloyd E. Sponenburgh[_3_] August 15th 11 12:19 AM

Friction welding
 
"David R. Birch" fired this volley in
:

The weld slag at the junction can be a bitch to remove.



"Slag" is a product of fluxes. Did they flux the joints?

LLoyd

DougC August 15th 11 01:08 AM

Friction welding
 
On 8/14/2011 1:38 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Is this an acceptable process?

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/81732304/?lt=ep

I think not, with the way it stopped the lathe. Maybe if the fixed piece
was allowed to spin before stopping the motor there would have been less of
a jolt.



As somebody else said, it's not a lathe. It's supposed to do that.

Another common use of this method is welding the exhaust turbines onto
turbocharger shafts. I looked a bit for some good videos of that but
didn't see any. The newer machines are a lot more protected, you can't
see much happening.... ten years ago, the older ones were quite a bit
more 'open" and lathe-like.

------

Can you do friction-welding on a regular lathe? Even of just two very
tiny parts? This would be more of a "stupid shop trick" more than
anything useful, but I do wonder.....

David R. Birch August 15th 11 01:38 AM

Friction welding
 
On 8/14/2011 6:19 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:
"David R. fired this volley in
:

The weld slag at the junction can be a bitch to remove.



"Slag" is a product of fluxes. Did they flux the joints?


That is a very limited definition of slag. AFAIK, no flux used.

David

Lloyd E. Sponenburgh[_3_] August 15th 11 01:41 AM

Friction welding
 
"David R. Birch" fired this volley in
:

That is a very limited definition of slag. AFAIK, no flux used.


Noooo.... The stuff that flakes on the surface from over-heating is
"scale", not "slag". Slag is non-metal stuff -- from flux.

LLoyd


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