A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Metalworking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

re-arching leaf springs



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 15th 08, 06:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default re-arching leaf springs

I have a couple of cars that need to have their leaf springs re-
arched. One web site mentioned that the process that they use is to
anneal, reform, quench and temper: http://www.eatonsprings.com/rearching.htm.

I have had leaf packs re-arched in the past and the leaves did not
show any signs of having been heated so I suspect that they only cold
formed them. I have looked a several web sites that mentioned
supporting the leaf between two stanchions and beating on the leaf
with a 2 lb or similar hammer. I have acquired a hydraulic press and
am thinking of doing the following: dismantle spring asm, make a
template of the current arch and what I want, gently bend each leaf,
working the entire length of the leaf till it has the desired form.
Spring would be constrained between the posts of the hydraulic press
so that the leaf could not fly away on me. Look at eh bottom of this
page at the picture of the “Mart-o-Matic (someone named Mart best as I
can tell) – I would do similar with my press.
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...t=32681&page=2 I
am trying to not spend monies that I do not have to in this "near
Depression".

Your thoughts?
Ads
  #2  
Old December 15th 08, 06:21 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default re-arching leaf springs


wrote in message
...
I have a couple of cars that need to have their leaf springs re-
arched. One web site mentioned that the process that they use is to
anneal, reform, quench and temper:
http://www.eatonsprings.com/rearching.htm.

I have had leaf packs re-arched in the past and the leaves did not
show any signs of having been heated so I suspect that they only cold
formed them. I have looked a several web sites that mentioned
supporting the leaf between two stanchions and beating on the leaf
with a 2 lb or similar hammer. I have acquired a hydraulic press and
am thinking of doing the following: dismantle spring asm, make a
template of the current arch and what I want, gently bend each leaf,
working the entire length of the leaf till it has the desired form.
Spring would be constrained between the posts of the hydraulic press
so that the leaf could not fly away on me. Look at eh bottom of this
page at the picture of the “Mart-o-Matic (someone named Mart best as I
can tell) – I would do similar with my press.
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...t=32681&page=2 I
am trying to not spend monies that I do not have to in this "near
Depression".

Your thoughts?
***************************
A very long time ago my highschool friend took the rear leaf spring from his
'41 Ford coupe to be re-arched so the eye that held the shackle bolt was
'up' instead of factory down. This lowered the rear of his car about 1.5"
.. . . .He took it to the local smelter blacksmith shop and they used 3 men,
and no heat, to do this.
They made a soapstone trace of the spring on a large plate of steel. Then
they put a large Vee block on the floor, on top of a block of wood. One man
was on a sledge hammer, one had a blacksmith fuller (round nosed wooden
handled chisel type tool) and one held the spring. They started near an
eyelet on one end of the spring and they made a hit with the fuller and
hammer about every 1/2". They went the lenght of the spring and then
checked it against the soapstone trace. It did not take that many passes to
fully reverse the arc of the spring. They finally had an identical shape
that matched the 'trace, but the eyes were inverted. This should work on
just re-arching a spring.



  #3  
Old December 15th 08, 07:44 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default re-arching leaf springs


wrote in message
...
I have a couple of cars that need to have their leaf springs re-
arched. One web site mentioned that the process that they use is to
anneal, reform, quench and temper:
http://www.eatonsprings.com/rearching.htm.

I have had leaf packs re-arched in the past and the leaves did not
show any signs of having been heated so I suspect that they only cold
formed them.

I've watched blacksmith shops re-arch leafs cold with a sledge hammer on an
anvil. One guy steadies the leaf on the anvil and the other smacks it
skillfully so as not to cause the leaf end to jolt the one holding it. The
leaf is repositioned after a few wacks.


  #4  
Old December 15th 08, 11:02 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 688
Default re-arching leaf springs

A couple of the posts have described the "blacksmith way". That should
tell you that it can be done with your hydraulic press as you suggest.
You didn't say what the width and thickness of the leaves are, but I'm
sure you understand that big leaves take more pressure and more distance
between the two underneath supports. Go slow with the press and be
prepared to measure carfully until you get the hang of it.

Pete Stanaitis
--------------

pintlar wrote:

wrote in message
...
I have a couple of cars that need to have their leaf springs re-
arched. One web site mentioned that the process that they use is to
anneal, reform, quench and temper:
http://www.eatonsprings.com/rearching.htm.

I have had leaf packs re-arched in the past and the leaves did not
show any signs of having been heated so I suspect that they only cold
formed them. I have looked a several web sites that mentioned
supporting the leaf between two stanchions and beating on the leaf
with a 2 lb or similar hammer. I have acquired a hydraulic press and
am thinking of doing the following: dismantle spring asm, make a
template of the current arch and what I want, gently bend each leaf,
working the entire length of the leaf till it has the desired form.
Spring would be constrained between the posts of the hydraulic press
so that the leaf could not fly away on me. Look at eh bottom of this
page at the picture of the “Mart-o-Matic (someone named Mart best as I
can tell) – I would do similar with my press.
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...t=32681&page=2 I
am trying to not spend monies that I do not have to in this "near
Depression".

Your thoughts?
***************************
A very long time ago my highschool friend took the rear leaf spring from his
'41 Ford coupe to be re-arched so the eye that held the shackle bolt was
'up' instead of factory down. This lowered the rear of his car about 1.5"
. . . .He took it to the local smelter blacksmith shop and they used 3 men,
and no heat, to do this.
They made a soapstone trace of the spring on a large plate of steel. Then
they put a large Vee block on the floor, on top of a block of wood. One man
was on a sledge hammer, one had a blacksmith fuller (round nosed wooden
handled chisel type tool) and one held the spring. They started near an
eyelet on one end of the spring and they made a hit with the fuller and
hammer about every 1/2". They went the lenght of the spring and then
checked it against the soapstone trace. It did not take that many passes to
fully reverse the arc of the spring. They finally had an identical shape
that matched the 'trace, but the eyes were inverted. This should work on
just re-arching a spring.



  #5  
Old December 15th 08, 11:21 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default re-arching leaf springs


"Bob Roberts" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 15 Dec 2008 11:44:12 -0800, "John Kunkel"
wrote:

I've watched blacksmith shops re-arch leafs cold with a sledge hammer on
an
anvil. One guy steadies the leaf on the anvil and the other smacks it
skillfully so as not to cause the leaf end to jolt the one holding it. The
leaf is repositioned after a few wacks.


This is exactly how we used to do it on dirt track stock cars, works
well.


Build a cage around your press. A huge amount of stored energy if the
spring lets go. Be safe out there!


  #6  
Old December 16th 08, 12:05 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 850
Default re-arching leaf springs

On Mon, 15 Dec 2008 17:21:12 -0600, "Mach1" wrote:


Build a cage around your press. A huge amount of stored energy if the
spring lets go. Be safe out there!



Actually, three firths of five eighths of f-all


Mark Rand
RTFM
  #7  
Old December 16th 08, 01:47 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 111
Default re-arching leaf springs


wrote in message
...
I have a couple of cars that need to have their leaf springs re-
arched. One web site mentioned that the process that they use is to
anneal, reform, quench and temper:
http://www.eatonsprings.com/rearching.htm.

I have had leaf packs re-arched in the past and the leaves did not
show any signs of having been heated so I suspect that they only cold
formed them. I have looked a several web sites that mentioned
supporting the leaf between two stanchions and beating on the leaf
with a 2 lb or similar hammer. I have acquired a hydraulic press and
am thinking of doing the following: dismantle spring asm, make a
template of the current arch and what I want, gently bend each leaf,
working the entire length of the leaf till it has the desired form.
Spring would be constrained between the posts of the hydraulic press
so that the leaf could not fly away on me. Look at eh bottom of this
page at the picture of the “Mart-o-Matic (someone named Mart best as I
can tell) – I would do similar with my press.
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...t=32681&page=2 I
am trying to not spend monies that I do not have to in this "near
Depression".

Your thoughts?


I've had broken spring leaves on my truck more than once, and the spring
shop just selected a blank of the right width, thickness and temper for my
truck, and proceeded to arch them in a hydraulic press: one man, no cage,
no sweat. A little push, move an inch, push again, - repeat as necessary
until desired profile is achieved. Reassemble the spting stack, remoount,
and off I went. The price was not unreasonable, either, especially when
compared to buying from the *Manufacturer's Authorized Dealer*, (who would
sell only the complete spring ASSEMBLY).

Flash

Flash


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
De-arching leaf springs ? [email protected] Metalworking 5 March 21st 08 04:54 PM
Flickering Lights and Buss Arching daokfella Home Repair 15 July 2nd 07 04:50 PM
replacement leaf springs for trailer Tom Woods UK diy 3 February 25th 07 11:04 PM
How to Springs Roger Jensen Metalworking 10 January 14th 05 09:47 AM
Springs Tom Gardner Metalworking 0 September 17th 04 07:09 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.