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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Wiring my Marathon motor



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 8th 06, 07:00 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

I have a Marathon catalog number Z506 electric motor, 5HP, 220V single
phase that I adapted on to my 80 gallon air compressor that had an old
2HP 3 phase motor. My house has 220V 50A
single phase circuit available to me. What do I need to wire it to my
house considering safety and reliability issues? Need breakers,
contactors, capacitors? A wiring diagram recommendation would be
extremely useful. I used to rough wire housing tracts but I have not
worked with an electric motor in such an "industrial" type application.
Help!

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  #2  
Old March 8th 06, 07:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

First go to www.marathonelectric.com and download the info, including
wiring diagram, for the motor. You will need a start contactor with
overload protection (OLP). There is no absolute requirement for OLP,
but it's highly desirable and worth the cost. Advance Controls Inc
(www.acicontrols.com) makes a line of of contactors with OLP that work
nicely for an application like this. The OLP module plugs into the
bottom of contactor. You'll have to decide what voltage you want to use
to operate the contactor coil before you buy it. Options are 24 VAC,
120 VAC, and 240 VAC. If you plan on the starting switch being close to
the motor, 240 VAC will be simplest. If you plan on the starting switch
to be some distance away, use 24 VAC (you'll need a door bell
transformer to supply the 24 VAC). 24 VAC wire (door bell wire) is
cheap and doesn't require fishing through walls or conduit. The
pressure switch on the compressor will have to be in series with the
starting switch. You can find ACI contactors with OLP for sale in many
places. I've bought them from FarmTek (www.farmtek.com) in the past. I
don't work for or sell products of the companies listed above.

Mike


trg-s338 wrote:
I have a Marathon catalog number Z506 electric motor, 5HP, 220V single
phase that I adapted on to my 80 gallon air compressor that had an old
2HP 3 phase motor. My house has 220V 50A
single phase circuit available to me. What do I need to wire it to my
house considering safety and reliability issues? Need breakers,
contactors, capacitors? A wiring diagram recommendation would be
extremely useful. I used to rough wire housing tracts but I have not
worked with an electric motor in such an "industrial" type application.
Help!

  #3  
Old March 8th 06, 07:42 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

trg-s338 wrote:

I have a Marathon catalog number Z506 electric motor, 5HP, 220V single
phase that I adapted on to my 80 gallon air compressor that had an old
2HP 3 phase motor. My house has 220V 50A
single phase circuit available to me. What do I need to wire it to my
house considering safety and reliability issues? Need breakers,
contactors, capacitors? A wiring diagram recommendation would be
extremely useful. I used to rough wire housing tracts but I have not
worked with an electric motor in such an "industrial" type application.
Help!


First off, you now have to buy a new mag switch and probably a new mag switch
enclosure, to accommodate the larger current. Make sure you pay close attention
to the voltage of the coil in the mag switch, if you get the wrong voltage
you'll have to install a transformer. New controls can cost several hundred
dollars. Then you have to make a bracket for mounting the new controls to the
machine, then you have to wire it all up. The wiring is by far the easy part.

GWE
  #4  
Old March 8th 06, 08:12 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

A 5 HP single phase motor, on 240 volts, should be fed with a 20 amp double
pole breaker. That size breaker would afford full load current protection
for the motor. Check with local code to be sure what is "right" for your
location.

Bob Swinney

g-s338" wrote in message
oups.com...
I have a Marathon catalog number Z506 electric motor, 5HP, 220V single
phase that I adapted on to my 80 gallon air compressor that had an old
2HP 3 phase motor. My house has 220V 50A
single phase circuit available to me. What do I need to wire it to my
house considering safety and reliability issues? Need breakers,
contactors, capacitors? A wiring diagram recommendation would be
extremely useful. I used to rough wire housing tracts but I have not
worked with an electric motor in such an "industrial" type application.
Help!



  #5  
Old March 9th 06, 05:41 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

On Thu, 9 Mar 2006 09:04:39 -0500, "Proctologically Violated©®"
wrote:

Good info, but here's a Q:
Isn't a contactor w/ OLP just a fused switch, w/ mebbe remote control?
In principle, couldn't a simple fused knife switch suffice?


NO! Do it right the first time and save yourself a whole lot of
grief. A proper motor starter is critical for all three-phase motor
applications, and a smart thing to do for any single phase motors over
roughly 3 to 5 HP. A motor starter is much cheaper than the motor
going up in smoke repeatedly.

The contactor half of a motor starter has a magnetic coil for fast
action, so the contacts spring open and closed fast. They have angled
alloy contact points (usually coin silver) that are designed to be
operated millions of times under load, and self-clean by a wiping
action when they close. They have magnetic arc chutes arranged that
any arcing on opening is directed out and away from the contacts to
quench quickly. The contacts do get cruddy from wear but still work
by design (self cleaning, remember?) but when they wear out and fail
to work they are easily replaceable.

Fused switches are simple copper alloy contact points that operate
relatively slowly, and Are Not Designed To Be Operated Repeatedly
Under Load. They may have some sort of arc chute arrangement, but
it's more to keep the switch from self-destructing if opened under
load accidentally or in an emergency. Burn the contacts up, and you
have to replace the whole thing.

The Overload Protection monitors the starting and running current on
all three phases, which is critical if one of the contact sets goes
bad or you blow a fuse on one phase.

A simple knife switch doesn't know or care about a single-phasing
problem. If the motor blows before the other two fuses, oh well...
If the motor is seriously overloaded or in a locked rotor condition,
the fuses will react much more slowly than the Starter Overload -
again, the motor may pop before the fuses do.

And a simple knife switch won't drop out if there's a power failure
as a safety feature like a properly wired Motor Starter does, so when
the power is restored the equipment will start right back up again -
doesn't matter that you have your arm in there trying to figure out
why it stopped... We'll call you "Lefty". If your head was in there,
we'll call you 'decedent'.

-- Bruce --
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
  #6  
Old March 10th 06, 10:57 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

On Thu, 9 Mar 2006 19:45:36 -0500, "Proctologically
Violated©®" wrote:

snip
Btw, I found a sort of a cure for noisey/buzzing contactors:
I think excessive buzzing means the coil is too weak for the springs. In
one of my bigger #3 contactors (an old GE), you can disassemble the whole
thing (really elegantly made), and change the springs behind the contacts.
I just happened to have a long spring w/ a better force constant (same diam,
thinner wire), that I was able to cut up and replace the original springs
with.
Now, nice normal quiet hummmm.


You should read this old thread:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.c...fa241e0413 b3

It sounds like you may have/had a broken shading coil( a
little copper loop inset in one face).

Just a thought, you might have missed this thread back in
Dec 2005.

--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
Remove no.spam for email
  #7  
Old March 17th 06, 09:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Wiring my Marathon motor

On Wed, 8 Mar 2006 13:12:01 -0600, Robert Swinney wrote:
A 5 HP single phase motor, on 240 volts, should be fed with a 20 amp double
pole breaker.


Not hardly.

My marathon 5hp is spec'ed at 27.5amps continuous on 230v. It has a
starting surge captured by my peak-reading clamp on ammeter at around
100amps. There is NO WAY it is going to run from a functional 20amp
breaker. Following NEC rules, since no delayed action breaker was
available for my panel, it is currently very happy on a 50amp breaker.

That size breaker would afford full load current protection
for the motor.


I depend on the motor's own overload protection and let the breaker
protect the wiring as that is the way things are designed to work.

Check with local code to be sure what is "right" for your
location.


That at least is very good advice.

sdb
--
Wanted: Omnibook 800 & accessories, cheap, working or not
sdbuse1 on mailhost bigfoot.com
 




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