A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Metalworking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Sanford Surface Grinder



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old November 12th 03, 07:36 PM
Alan Rothenbush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

I just bought a Sanford Surface Grinder via eBay, even though I've never
even seen one. I just decided I needed (OK, wanted) a surface grinder and
the ONLY place in the shop where one could possibly be located meant a
benchtop unit and that was that.

So, halftime of a boring Monday Night Footbal game, I was trolling eBay and
lo and behold, there it was, with a "Buy It Now" price I couldn't resist.

But now for SHMBO ...

"Honey, have you bought me a Christmas present yet ?"

A somewhat angry reply

"No ! You haven't told me what you want and you don't need anything and I
don't really have time to go shopping and so, no !"

A meek rejoinder

"How about buying me a surface grinder for Christmas ?"

And the next angry reply

"If you want a surface grinder, buy it yourself !"


CLICK went the ENTER key, and now somewhere between Florida and Washington
State is 250 pounds of grinder.


Merry Christmas to me, Merry Christmas to me
Merry Christmas dear Alan
Merry Christmas to me !


Next step was to scour the 'net looking for info on Sanford, with a
staggering lack of success.

I went to DejaNews and looked up and read all the posts from this group, but
didn't find all that I was looking for.

SO, in the hope that there's someone out there with hitherto unpublished or
unannounced information, can anyone point me to online verions of

an owner's manual
a part manual
a list of tips and "look out for"s


Thanks in advance.

Alan


Ads
  #2  
Old November 12th 03, 09:32 PM
Grant Erwin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

I suggest you look it over carefully, maybe clean the machine, level
it, and figure out how to lube it. Then figure out how to change wheels.
A word of caution: many little grinders have a left hand thread on the
flange on the wheel adapter. If you're lucky, it will use Sopko adapters
and if you're real lucky, it will have the Sopko wrench. Get in the habit
of trying to tighten things as little as possible. You don't want the
wheel to spin on you but you don't need to crush it.

Wire it up and fire it up. It should sound smooth and even. If it sounds
gritty, you got screwed. Little grinders are only as good as their spindle
bearings. If it seems great, then put on a wheel and start thinking about
how to dress it. Read up on dressing surface grinder wheels. I don't see
any reason not to use the el cheapo grinder dresser fixture from HF. It's
just a hunk of iron. You will definitely want a "dressing stone" too -
this isn't something that goes on your mag chuck, it's a piece of "stone"
that you hold in your hand and manually dress the face of your wheel when
it loads up. If you're grinding hot rolled steel and it starts grinding a
little funny, check your wheel for glazing right away - if you try to grind
with a glazed wheel it just gets hot. Hot means bigger, and bigger wheel
means deeper cut and *maybe* a wheel shattering. Get a dressing stone. Norton
makes one called "norbide" or something like that, and they're dirt cheap.

With the ways lubed and the wheel properly trued and dressed, put a chunk
of steel on the mag chuck. It's smart practice to put other pieces up
against the workpiece - these are called "blocking pieces" and this is
to take advantage of more of the mag chuck's holding power.

It's good to go REAL SLOW when touching down. If you don't know where the
high spot is, and are too lazy to mount a DTI to find out, then put a
piece of paper on where you guess the high spot is. Stick it down with
um, spit. Lower gently until the paper whisks away, then crank the whole
part around. If it starts sparking anywhere, go up a little. Here's a
very important point. You have to get this drilled in:

HALF A THOU IS A HUGE HOGGING CUT ON A LITTLE GRINDER.

Go much deeper, and you will shatter the wheel.

Anyway, that's my take on it. No, I don't have any parts or manual for
it, but these machines are usually simple. Leveling is important because
the ways probably won't lube right unless the machine is level.

Grant


Alan Rothenbush wrote:

I just bought a Sanford Surface Grinder via eBay, even though I've never
even seen one. I just decided I needed (OK, wanted) a surface grinder and
the ONLY place in the shop where one could possibly be located meant a
benchtop unit and that was that.

So, halftime of a boring Monday Night Footbal game, I was trolling eBay and
lo and behold, there it was, with a "Buy It Now" price I couldn't resist.

But now for SHMBO ...

"Honey, have you bought me a Christmas present yet ?"

A somewhat angry reply

"No ! You haven't told me what you want and you don't need anything and I
don't really have time to go shopping and so, no !"

A meek rejoinder

"How about buying me a surface grinder for Christmas ?"

And the next angry reply

"If you want a surface grinder, buy it yourself !"


CLICK went the ENTER key, and now somewhere between Florida and Washington
State is 250 pounds of grinder.


Merry Christmas to me, Merry Christmas to me
Merry Christmas dear Alan
Merry Christmas to me !


Next step was to scour the 'net looking for info on Sanford, with a
staggering lack of success.

I went to DejaNews and looked up and read all the posts from this group, but
didn't find all that I was looking for.

SO, in the hope that there's someone out there with hitherto unpublished or
unannounced information, can anyone point me to online verions of

an owner's manual
a part manual
a list of tips and "look out for"s


Thanks in advance.

Alan



  #3  
Old November 12th 03, 10:18 PM
Alan Rothenbush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

Grant;

Thanks for the thoughts, I'll take them all to heart, especially the one
about a glazed wheel. Hadn't thought about that.

(Or about the extra "blocking" piece .. or the DTI .. or the ... )

I understand about the depth of cut.

In fact, I plan to "CNC" this machine, largely for this reason. Twenty
thou, 1/10 at a time, is less onerous if the machine is doing the work.
(And being an electronics guy, I can't resist)

I'm thinking about a stepper on the "Y" and "Z", with a DC servo on the "X".
A VERY simple program composed of variables and loops and I'm done. I'll
probably do this with a microcontroller and a small LCD, as I'm VERY short
on space, I'm pretty good with micros and mostly, I have a bunch around
from previous projects.

The good news is that I'm never more than 10 feet away, so any "funny
noises" should be quickly captured.

( I wonder, maybe an accurate tach on the spindle or an accurate ammeter in
the motor circuit .. surely, if the wheel started to load up, the spindle
would slow OR the motor current would rise. Either event could then
trigger an EStop ... )

Anyway, thanks again. I will read everything I can get my hands on, but
there's nothing like experience to tell you what chapters to read twice !

Now, to find a mag chuck at an affordable price ...

Alan

Grant Erwin wrote:

I suggest you look it over carefully, maybe clean the machine, level
it, and figure out how to lube it. Then figure out how to change wheels.
A word of caution: many little grinders have a left hand thread on the
flange on the wheel adapter. If you're lucky, it will use Sopko adapters
and if you're real lucky, it will have the Sopko wrench. Get in the habit
of trying to tighten things as little as possible. You don't want the
wheel to spin on you but you don't need to crush it.


  #4  
Old November 12th 03, 11:36 PM
Grant Erwin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

AH!! No mag chuck. Well then! You are going to want the procedure for
"grinding in" a new mag chuck, Alan. Here's the deal: it HAS to be
done with full flood coolant. So you are going to need a pond pump,
a bucket, some tubing, and some coolant fluid. Then you clean the
place where the chuck goes so it's CLEAN. Then you lightly bolt the
chuck on upside down, turn on the coolant, and grind until it comes
clean everywhere. Then you remove the chuck, again CLEAN, install the
chuck right side up to correct torque, dialing in the sides so they
are dead parallel, then again turn on the coolant and grind clean. You
don't want a mirror finish, just a commercial grind finish. This should
be done by about a 46 grit stone dressed so it is as open as possible.

It took me about 4 hours to grind in my 6x12" chuck. You *might* want
to do your CNC thing first. Oh, and when you do the CNC thing, you
might also consider automating just the X and Y feeds, and do the
downfeeds manually. You can get into a lot of trouble downfeeding!
That's what the big hydraulic grinders I've run are like.

Grant

To email me see http://www.tinyisland.com/email.html

Alan Rothenbush wrote:

Grant;

Thanks for the thoughts, I'll take them all to heart, especially the one
about a glazed wheel. Hadn't thought about that.

(Or about the extra "blocking" piece .. or the DTI .. or the ... )

I understand about the depth of cut.

In fact, I plan to "CNC" this machine, largely for this reason. Twenty
thou, 1/10 at a time, is less onerous if the machine is doing the work.
(And being an electronics guy, I can't resist)

I'm thinking about a stepper on the "Y" and "Z", with a DC servo on the "X".
A VERY simple program composed of variables and loops and I'm done. I'll
probably do this with a microcontroller and a small LCD, as I'm VERY short
on space, I'm pretty good with micros and mostly, I have a bunch around
from previous projects.

The good news is that I'm never more than 10 feet away, so any "funny
noises" should be quickly captured.

( I wonder, maybe an accurate tach on the spindle or an accurate ammeter in
the motor circuit .. surely, if the wheel started to load up, the spindle
would slow OR the motor current would rise. Either event could then
trigger an EStop ... )

Anyway, thanks again. I will read everything I can get my hands on, but
there's nothing like experience to tell you what chapters to read twice !

Now, to find a mag chuck at an affordable price ...

Alan

Grant Erwin wrote:


I suggest you look it over carefully, maybe clean the machine, level
it, and figure out how to lube it. Then figure out how to change wheels.
A word of caution: many little grinders have a left hand thread on the
flange on the wheel adapter. If you're lucky, it will use Sopko adapters
and if you're real lucky, it will have the Sopko wrench. Get in the habit
of trying to tighten things as little as possible. You don't want the
wheel to spin on you but you don't need to crush it.




  #5  
Old November 13th 03, 01:34 AM
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

Oh, Alan, you beat me to it! So where's it going? Gonna move a
wall and move the South Bend and the horizontal mill into new quarters?
Or, my (first) marriage survived a Porsche engine under the bed for
a few months - perhaps move something into *her* ("our") living space?
Having witnessed the pain you went through disposing of those compressor
parts, I don't really see you actually SELLING anything...

I rather liked my line - borrowed from a friend of Guy Lautard - "A
lathe followed me home and I think I'll keep it....."


/mark


Alan Rothenbush wrote:

I just bought a Sanford Surface Grinder via eBay, even though I've never
even seen one. I just decided I needed (OK, wanted) a surface grinder and
the ONLY place in the shop where one could possibly be located meant a
benchtop unit and that was that.

So, halftime of a boring Monday Night Footbal game, I was trolling eBay and
lo and behold, there it was, with a "Buy It Now" price I couldn't resist.

But now for SHMBO ...

"Honey, have you bought me a Christmas present yet ?"

A somewhat angry reply

"No ! You haven't told me what you want and you don't need anything and I
don't really have time to go shopping and so, no !"

A meek rejoinder

"How about buying me a surface grinder for Christmas ?"

And the next angry reply

"If you want a surface grinder, buy it yourself !"

CLICK went the ENTER key, and now somewhere between Florida and Washington
State is 250 pounds of grinder.

Merry Christmas to me, Merry Christmas to me
Merry Christmas dear Alan
Merry Christmas to me !

Next step was to scour the 'net looking for info on Sanford, with a
staggering lack of success.

I went to DejaNews and looked up and read all the posts from this group, but
didn't find all that I was looking for.

SO, in the hope that there's someone out there with hitherto unpublished or
unannounced information, can anyone point me to online verions of

an owner's manual
a part manual
a list of tips and "look out for"s

Thanks in advance.

Alan

  #6  
Old November 13th 03, 01:53 AM
DoN. Nichols
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

In article , Alan Rothenbush wrote:
I just bought a Sanford Surface Grinder via eBay, even though I've never
even seen one. I just decided I needed (OK, wanted) a surface grinder and
the ONLY place in the shop where one could possibly be located meant a
benchtop unit and that was that.

So, halftime of a boring Monday Night Footbal game, I was trolling eBay and
lo and behold, there it was, with a "Buy It Now" price I couldn't resist.


[ ... ]

"If you want a surface grinder, buy it yourself !"


CLICK went the ENTER key, and now somewhere between Florida and Washington
State is 250 pounds of grinder.


Congratulations!

Next step was to scour the 'net looking for info on Sanford, with a
staggering lack of success.


And the company went incommunicado shortly after I got mine.
(But not before I got a manual from them -- perhaps the last.)

I went to DejaNews and looked up and read all the posts from this group, but
didn't find all that I was looking for.

SO, in the hope that there's someone out there with hitherto unpublished or
unannounced information, can anyone point me to online verions of

an owner's manual


Yep.

a part manual


Sort of a part of the owner's manual, but not complete.

a list of tips and "look out for"s


How about some advice on a modification to the power supply for
the magnetic chuck?

For the manual, and some flyers and quote sheets, check out:

http://www.d-and-d.com/misc/MANUALS/Sanford/index.html

You'll also find the rewiring information there.

*Please* -- don't ask your browser to download multiple things
at once. *You* may have a lot of bandwidth, but you will be limited by
my end, which has to work with a 56k Frame Relay connection, and other
things have to share that bandwidth, including my e-mail and news feed.
Asking for a second thing before the first is complete will mean that
you will be slowing down the download of the first thing, so you will
take about the same time as before, and possibly choking off my
bandwidth so nothing else can go through.

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
  #7  
Old November 13th 03, 02:10 AM
DoN. Nichols
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

In article , Alan Rothenbush wrote:
Grant;

Thanks for the thoughts, I'll take them all to heart, especially the one
about a glazed wheel. Hadn't thought about that.


And, yes it *does* have a left-hand thread on the spindle nut.
A hinged two-pin spanner is needed to loosen/tighten it.

[ ... ]

Anyway, thanks again. I will read everything I can get my hands on, but
there's nothing like experience to tell you what chapters to read twice !

Now, to find a mag chuck at an affordable price ...


The trick is finding one which is not too large for the machine.
Most are.

Mine came with a electric mag chuck. Note that the manual warns
to not use coolant with the electric version of the chuck -- just with a
permanent magnet version.

Also, note that the manual (at least the last ones) warn to
interchange the connector halves on the mag chuck, as the original had a
male connector on each end, which means that you have 150V or more on
the bare pins if you disconnect it from the chuck end.

Enjoy,
DoN.

--
Email: | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
  #8  
Old November 13th 03, 02:31 PM
Donald
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

----------
A professional machinist friend of mine rebuilt a Sanford and he had a heck
of a time finding new spindle bearings.It seems they used "magneto" bearings
which haven"t been manufactured since the 30's and Sanford wanted over $300
for a pair of replacement bearings, but he finally found a bearing house
that had a substitute.
Don Warner
------------
"Alan Rothenbush" wrote in message
...
I just bought a Sanford Surface Grinder via eBay, even though I've never
even seen one. I just decided I needed (OK, wanted) a surface grinder and
the ONLY place in the shop where one could possibly be located meant a
benchtop unit and that was that.

So, halftime of a boring Monday Night Footbal game, I was trolling eBay

and
lo and behold, there it was, with a "Buy It Now" price I couldn't resist.

But now for SHMBO ...

"Honey, have you bought me a Christmas present yet ?"

A somewhat angry reply

"No ! You haven't told me what you want and you don't need anything and

I
don't really have time to go shopping and so, no !"

A meek rejoinder

"How about buying me a surface grinder for Christmas ?"

And the next angry reply

"If you want a surface grinder, buy it yourself !"


CLICK went the ENTER key, and now somewhere between Florida and Washington
State is 250 pounds of grinder.


Merry Christmas to me, Merry Christmas to me
Merry Christmas dear Alan
Merry Christmas to me !


Next step was to scour the 'net looking for info on Sanford, with a
staggering lack of success.

I went to DejaNews and looked up and read all the posts from this group,

but
didn't find all that I was looking for.

SO, in the hope that there's someone out there with hitherto unpublished

or
unannounced information, can anyone point me to online verions of

an owner's manual
a part manual
a list of tips and "look out for"s


Thanks in advance.

Alan




  #9  
Old November 13th 03, 07:41 PM
Alan Rothenbush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder


Sorry about that Mark. I've been watching, kinda casually, for benchtop SGs
on eBay, and they all seem to go for way more than I'm willing to spend,
typically in the $800 - $900 range.

So when I saw this one with a BuyItNow of $350.00, I couldn't resist.
Reading the archives, though, this seems to be slightly on the high side
for _private_ deals of a couple of years ago. itseems like eBay has run up
the prices on these things a whole bunch.

I wasn't TOO worried about finding a place for it ( until last night ). You
see, I have one corner (by the stairs), where the hydraulic press sits.
I've been planning on moving the press anyway, and so I though this was a
perfect item to go in its place.

But then last night, I found another Sanford on eBay (for $800) with a bunch
of pictures. For the first time, I saw the back of a Sanford .. and
there's a motor sticking out !

Now, of course there would be, but I just wasn't thinking about that. This
motor sticking out in this corner would effectively block the stairs.

So, I may be adding a fourth motor to go along with the three "CNC" motors.

That fourth motor will likely be a DC motor ('cuz they're smaller for the
same power) mounted _above_ the spindle pointing forwards (where I can bang
my head on it) with a belt running down to a pulley located more or less
where the original motor lives.

Or I may just punch a hole in the wall ( a slot, really ) and build a little
weatherproof box around it.

But I WILL find room for it .. sorry.

Alan

Mark wrote:

Oh, Alan, you beat me to it! So where's it going? Gonna move a
wall and move the South Bend and the horizontal mill into new quarters?
Or, my (first) marriage survived a Porsche engine under the bed for
a few months - perhaps move something into *her* ("our") living space?
Having witnessed the pain you went through disposing of those compressor
parts, I don't really see you actually SELLING anything...

I rather liked my line - borrowed from a friend of Guy Lautard - "A
lathe followed me home and I think I'll keep it....."


/mark



  #10  
Old November 13th 03, 08:19 PM
Alan Rothenbush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sanford Surface Grinder

Don;

Many thanks for taking the time to write.

I tried quickly to connect to your web site, but to no avail. I'll
try again later on tonight (10:00 or so PST), which may be a "more
polite" time to download things.

( Swamping the connection of a guy doing you a favour is pretty darn
rude )

As far as mag chucks go, there's an eBay guy selling a 4x7 for
$100.00, which doesn't seem too bad. There's a cheaper 5x10, but I
suspect a chuck that size might be more trouble than it's worth.

Any thoughts ?

Thanks again.

Alan

P.S. email sent to the address on your news post bounced ...

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brown & Sharpe surface grinder info MP Toolman Metalworking 6 September 24th 03 03:51 PM
Abrasive #1 1/2 Surface Grinder info needed rstreift@cisco.[email protected] Metalworking 2 July 11th 03 10:26 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.