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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Small lathes, like JET BD-920N



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 27th 05, 02:59 AM
Tim Killian
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It is the same lathe as the Jet BD920. Both have speed reduction gears
and both use a belt drive from the motor. Neither one is made in Taiwan.

szaki wrote:

This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.
I read some where the BV20 9x20 is a better lathe over all than the JET
and like.
Made in Taiwan has gear head, insteade of belts.
There is a BV 920 sold by Harborfreight, not sure if it's the same as
the BV20 or a newer version.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45861
JS

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  #13  
Old September 27th 05, 05:59 AM
szaki
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Tim Killian wrote:
It is the same lathe as the Jet BD920. Both have speed reduction gears
and both use a belt drive from the motor. Neither one is made in Taiwan.

szaki wrote:

This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.
I read some where the BV20 9x20 is a better lathe over all than the
JET and like.
Made in Taiwan has gear head, insteade of belts.
There is a BV 920 sold by Harborfreight, not sure if it's the same as
the BV20 or a newer version.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45861
JS


Gee, these companies! Offer the same crap in different colors.
Who sells BV20 lathes?
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe..._9x20.htm#BV20

If you need the 20" between centers for working on more that

Contender barrels, then you might look into Samuel Machinery's BV20E-L.
After asking Hank and Tom, of Samuel Machinery, about it's quality, they
assured me it had none of the design problems of the normal offerings
of 9x20, being of a completely different design, and much better
manufacturing quality. Tom did say that, in his opinion, it wasn't as
nice a machine as their CH-350, but was far above the Chinese 9x20's.

It sells for $895 with all of the accessories the other 9x20's have...
Follower rest, steady rest, faceplate, 4-jaw chuck, etc. I'm not aware
of anybody that owns one of these, but a couple of members saw it at the
Cabin Fever show and might be the best source to answer questions on
finer details.

Julius

  #14  
Old September 27th 05, 06:18 AM
szaki
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D Murphy wrote:
szaki wrote in news:H82dnYrEVO7rBaXeRVn-
:


This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.



Hourly workers still have costs. Probably even higher than I estimated.
Wasted time is wasted money. The more money the company makes the better
off you and they are.

Unless they get paid for engineering time, every non production employee's
salary is a burden on the production workers hourly cost. Your time is the
only thing that can be charged for besides raw materials. The cost of your
time includes the cost of non production salaries.


I understand, I use to work in job shops, where every thing was logged,
even the left over or scrap material and setup time too!
Here, the small lathe is not used for production, more like assist.
I'm grinding crystals for lasers on CNC mills, that's what pays for my
salary. Some times have to build a fixture and need a lathe to turn
pins, brass centers, small parts, machinable ceramics on the side.
Old hobby lathe is in bad shape and need a new one that's why I'm
looking it the 9x20 lathes.
Company don't want to spend thousands $$$ on lathe that sits most of the
time. They OK a $1000 spending for it.
I use to work on larger, quality, precision Hardinge lathes, this is a
step down for me.
Julius





I read some where the BV20 9x20 is a better lathe over all than the JET
and like.
Made in Taiwan has gear head, insteade of belts.
There is a BV 920 sold by Harborfreight, not sure if it's the same as
the BV20 or a newer version.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45861


Out of the frying pan and into the fire.


  #15  
Old September 27th 05, 06:45 AM
Gunner
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On 27 Sep 2005 04:50:51 GMT, D Murphy wrote:

szaki wrote in news:H82dnYrEVO7rBaXeRVn-
:

This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.


Hourly workers still have costs. Probably even higher than I estimated.
Wasted time is wasted money. The more money the company makes the better
off you and they are.

Unless they get paid for engineering time, every non production employee's
salary is a burden on the production workers hourly cost. Your time is the
only thing that can be charged for besides raw materials. The cost of your
time includes the cost of non production salaries.

I read some where the BV20 9x20 is a better lathe over all than the JET
and like.
Made in Taiwan has gear head, insteade of belts.
There is a BV 920 sold by Harborfreight, not sure if it's the same as
the BV20 or a newer version.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45861


Out of the frying pan and into the fire.



Sigh...look around and find yourself a nice older 10-12"Clausing, 11"
Logan or even a Southbend. They will set you back a grand to $1500
with some tooling if you look around, and will be 20x the lathe of the
lil Chicom ones.

They are all manufactured by the Red Dragon Noodle and Machine Tool
Collective. Tuesday- Thursday lathes get sold to Grizzley and
Jet..the Monday lathes to HF, the Friday lathes to Homier...

Gunner

"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire.
Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us)
off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give
them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the **** out of you
for torturing the cat." Gunner
  #16  
Old September 27th 05, 08:02 AM
Don Foreman
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:55:17 -0700, szaki wrote:


This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.


Then you will want some precision. Buying an Asian import would be
pennywise but pound foolish even if nobody's watching the clock.
You don't need a big lathe but you do need a good one.

Maybe Gunner can find you a Hardinge.



  #17  
Old September 27th 05, 04:42 PM
Tim Killian
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We recently bought one of the 9x20 Chinese lathes for a specific,
recurring job that involves turning down the OD of HRS rings. It's a
simple, one tool task that requires a couple of passes to get the proper
average OD. We used to send these parts to an outside shop where they
turned them for us at $10 each. They upped their price to $18, and at
that point we decided to bring the work inside. The BD920 clone we are
using cost under $1K and it does just as good a job as the other shop's
$90K turning center on these simple parts. Even with the added cost for
labor, our machine will pay for itself in less than a year.

Would a 30 year old SB or Hardinge for $1500 be a better lathe? Sure,
but when you factor in the cost to find, check out, deliver, and install
one of these old machines, the final price is more like $5K. And the
price of spares (if you can find them) for those dinosaurs is usually
outrageous as well. In raw dollars and cents terms, the $1K lathes are
not a bad investment for simple tasks.


Don Foreman wrote:
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:55:17 -0700, szaki wrote:



This is not a job shop, we machine crystals for lasers! We just need a
lathe to turn some pins and other parts for fixtures.
No one hold a clock over any one heads.



Then you will want some precision. Buying an Asian import would be
pennywise but pound foolish even if nobody's watching the clock.
You don't need a big lathe but you do need a good one.

Maybe Gunner can find you a Hardinge.



  #18  
Old September 27th 05, 05:14 PM
Rex B
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Tim Killian wrote:
We recently bought one of the 9x20 Chinese lathes for a specific,
recurring job that involves turning down the OD of HRS rings. It's a
simple, one tool task that requires a couple of passes to get the proper
average OD. We used to send these parts to an outside shop where they
turned them for us at $10 each. They upped their price to $18, and at
that point we decided to bring the work inside. The BD920 clone we are
using cost under $1K and it does just as good a job as the other shop's
$90K turning center on these simple parts. Even with the added cost for
labor, our machine will pay for itself in less than a year.

Would a 30 year old SB or Hardinge for $1500 be a better lathe? Sure,
but when you factor in the cost to find, check out, deliver, and install
one of these old machines, the final price is more like $5K. And the
price of spares (if you can find them) for those dinosaurs is usually
outrageous as well. In raw dollars and cents terms, the $1K lathes are
not a bad investment for simple tasks.


Well put, Tim

Someone else posted some info about 9x20s from Samuel Machinery.
They also show a 10x27 for $995 with lots of features and extras. I'd be
pretty interested in that. None of the links pan out, and I did not find
a website.

Rex
  #19  
Old September 27th 05, 05:57 PM
Don Foreman
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On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 09:42:48 -0600, Tim Killian
wrote:

We recently bought one of the 9x20 Chinese lathes for a specific,
recurring job that involves turning down the OD of HRS rings. It's a
simple, one tool task that requires a couple of passes to get the proper
average OD. We used to send these parts to an outside shop where they
turned them for us at $10 each. They upped their price to $18, and at
that point we decided to bring the work inside. The BD920 clone we are
using cost under $1K and it does just as good a job as the other shop's
$90K turning center on these simple parts. Even with the added cost for
labor, our machine will pay for itself in less than a year.

Would a 30 year old SB or Hardinge for $1500 be a better lathe? Sure,
but when you factor in the cost to find, check out, deliver, and install
one of these old machines, the final price is more like $5K. And the
price of spares (if you can find them) for those dinosaurs is usually
outrageous as well. In raw dollars and cents terms, the $1K lathes are
not a bad investment for simple tasks.




Spares for import machines, two years after purchase?
----
Depends on required tolerances. I would think pins for fixtures
would need to be pretty accurate. Accuracy comes, in part, from
rigidity. You can work to .0005 tolerance on a springy lathe, but
it takes a lot longer.

Might be better to use stock sizes of ground rod or dowel pins and
ream the holes; then you don't need a lathe at all except perhaps to
cut stock to length and chamfer the ends.

Check out the Sheldon Gunner noted in another post.

  #20  
Old September 27th 05, 06:14 PM
Mike Young
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"Rex B" wrote in message
...
Someone else posted some info about 9x20s from Samuel Machinery.
They also show a 10x27 for $995 with lots of features and extras. I'd be
pretty interested in that. None of the links pan out, and I did not find a
website.


Of such hopes, dreams, and customer enthusiasm are Internet dollars made. It
makes you wonder, though. There's obviously a market for good, small, solid
$1500 lathes, and $2500 mills. Instead, we have the $1k junk, or the $5000
overflow-your-garage-in-a-heartbeat product lines. More dollars just buys
larger junk, not small, usable machines. What's a home machinist to do? You
can try to build it yourself, of course, but traditional construction --
heavy iron, ground ways -- is not something you can do easily, even starting
with non-junk machines to cut them. Linear motion components are eBay or
other questionable sources, or astronomical, again with nothing in between.
Actually, that's where I'm starting to look. What's wrong with just bolting
a 10" angle-lock vise or rotary table, with no traditional table, to linear
motion guides? The Kurt vise alone blows the budget, but who's counting?

 




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