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-   -   Heliweld arc stabilizer (http://www.diybanter.com/metalworking/118585-re-heliweld-arc-stabilizer.html)

Grant Erwin August 27th 05 02:16 AM

Heliweld arc stabilizer
 
Ignoramus18245 wrote:

I just won a 4x4x2 ft box of tools that includes a "heliweld arc
stabilizer". ($400 total). I am curious if I can somehow use it and
other low cost components to make a nice wire or tig welder.


I think you'll find it's basically made of what will look a lot like a
transformer, but is in fact a big inductor. This will tend to even out changes
in current, since inductors resist changes in current. So you might be able to
make an AC transformer into a decent CC welder. Yes, TIG welders are CC, but it
takes more than an arc stabilizer to make a TIG welder. Wire? Forget it -- for
that you need CV, which calls for a big-ass bank of capacitors.

GWE

Grant Erwin August 27th 05 05:31 AM

Ignoramus18245 wrote:
On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 17:16:24 -0700, Grant Erwin wrote:

Ignoramus18245 wrote:


I just won a 4x4x2 ft box of tools that includes a "heliweld arc
stabilizer". ($400 total). I am curious if I can somehow use it and
other low cost components to make a nice wire or tig welder.


I think you'll find it's basically made of what will look a lot like a
transformer, but is in fact a big inductor. This will tend to even out changes
in current, since inductors resist changes in current. So you might be able to
make an AC transformer into a decent CC welder. Yes, TIG welders are CC, but it
takes more than an arc stabilizer to make a TIG welder.



Thanks.


Wire? Forget it -- for
that you need CV, which calls for a big-ass bank of capacitors.



How big ass? I am asking because I have some seriously big capacitors
right now.


My Millermatic 250 uses 8 15000 uF 45VDC electrolytics in parallel. It's the
only data point I have. Obviously, more would be better.

GWE

[email protected] August 27th 05 06:52 AM

It may be a unit to add high voltage to a welder. It would make
restarting an arc with 7018 a lot easier.

Dan


Ignoramus18245 wrote:
I just won a 4x4x2 ft box of tools that includes a "heliweld arc
stabilizer". ($400 total). I am curious if I can somehow use it and
other low cost components to make a nice wire or tig welder.



Don Foreman August 27th 05 07:23 AM

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 02:30:44 GMT, Ignoramus18245
wrote:

On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 17:16:24 -0700, Grant Erwin wrote:
Ignoramus18245 wrote:

I just won a 4x4x2 ft box of tools that includes a "heliweld arc
stabilizer". ($400 total). I am curious if I can somehow use it and
other low cost components to make a nice wire or tig welder.


I think you'll find it's basically made of what will look a lot like a
transformer, but is in fact a big inductor. This will tend to even out changes
in current, since inductors resist changes in current. So you might be able to
make an AC transformer into a decent CC welder. Yes, TIG welders are CC, but it
takes more than an arc stabilizer to make a TIG welder.


Thanks.

Wire? Forget it -- for
that you need CV, which calls for a big-ass bank of capacitors.


How big ass? I am asking because I have some seriously big capacitors
right now.


Millermatic 210: four 30,000 uF 45 volt



Kelley Mascher August 27th 05 11:21 PM

Normally these add high frequency output to an AC welder power source
to stabilize the output for TIG welding.

Cheers,

Kelley
On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 23:54:10 GMT, Ignoramus18245
wrote:


I just won a 4x4x2 ft box of tools that includes a "heliweld arc
stabilizer". ($400 total). I am curious if I can somehow use it and
other low cost components to make a nice wire or tig welder.



Wayne Cook August 28th 05 08:06 AM

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 22:57:29 GMT, Ignoramus4038
wrote:

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 14:21:34 -0700, Kelley Mascher wrote:
Normally these add high frequency output to an AC welder power source
to stabilize the output for TIG welding.


Thanks. So, with this, I could make a "tig welder" by adding a gun and
inert gas? Is that right? And could I weld steel and aluminum with that?

i
completely ignorant about welding



No this would add high frequency to the normal output of a DC
welder. High frequency is used to initiate the arc for TIG welding.
This is done so that you don't have to contaminate the tungsten by
scratch starting the arc. You can TIG weld with most DC welders but it
requires contact with the work piece to start the arc. High frequency
is a way to avoid it. What high frequency means is basically a very
high voltage at a high frequency which is impressed over the normal DC
voltage of the welder in order to start the arc without touching the
work. This is what really separates the TIG welders from the Stick
welders. There are other features on the newer (and older high end)
TIG welders as well but this is the real difference.

Wayne Cook
Shamrock, TX
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm

Kelley Mascher August 28th 05 06:57 PM

You're correct, Wayne, I should have said something about high
frequency arc starting. It's possible that the unit in question would
work on DC. However, I'm pretty sure since, it's called a stabilizer,
it will at least supply continuous high frequency output for an AC
power source. Continuous high frequency is used to stabilize AC for
aluminum TIG welding.

So, until there is more information on the exact model of the device,
I think that, with the addition of a TIG torch and gas, minimally, it
should allow TIG welding.

Cheers,

Kelley

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 01:06:42 -0500, Wayne Cook
wrote:

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 22:57:29 GMT, Ignoramus4038
wrote:

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 14:21:34 -0700, Kelley Mascher wrote:
Normally these add high frequency output to an AC welder power source
to stabilize the output for TIG welding.


Thanks. So, with this, I could make a "tig welder" by adding a gun and
inert gas? Is that right? And could I weld steel and aluminum with that?

i
completely ignorant about welding



No this would add high frequency to the normal output of a DC
welder. High frequency is used to initiate the arc for TIG welding.
This is done so that you don't have to contaminate the tungsten by
scratch starting the arc. You can TIG weld with most DC welders but it
requires contact with the work piece to start the arc. High frequency
is a way to avoid it. What high frequency means is basically a very
high voltage at a high frequency which is impressed over the normal DC
voltage of the welder in order to start the arc without touching the
work. This is what really separates the TIG welders from the Stick
welders. There are other features on the newer (and older high end)
TIG welders as well but this is the real difference.

Wayne Cook
Shamrock, TX
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm



Wayne Cook August 29th 05 12:11 AM

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 09:57:34 -0700, Kelley Mascher
wrote:

You're correct, Wayne, I should have said something about high
frequency arc starting. It's possible that the unit in question would
work on DC. However, I'm pretty sure since, it's called a stabilizer,
it will at least supply continuous high frequency output for an AC
power source. Continuous high frequency is used to stabilize AC for
aluminum TIG welding.

I did say DC didn't I. I wasn't thinking to well last night. I've
been sick this weekend and I'm not in top form. Yes it will provide
high frequency for both AC and DC but it won't provide the welding
current if it's what I think it is. For that he'll need a stick welder
of some form preferably a AC/DC unit with remote capability.


Wayne Cook
Shamrock, TX
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm

Jerry Martes August 29th 05 03:56 AM


"Ignoramus5361" wrote in message
.. .
On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 09:57:34 -0700, Kelley Mascher
So, with a heliweld, gas, torch, and an AC buzzbox, I could have a tig
welder that would work on both steel and aluminum?

i


I

You'll want to make the buzzbox DC if you want to work with steel.

You wont need the High Freq High Voltage with DC TIG with this machine you
are describing.

You will need the HFHV if you want to use this machine on AC. AC is
really a must for aluminum

When it is complted, it is very unlikely that the welds made with the
machine will resemble what is normally be considered TIG welds.

It is my observation that it is interesting to build a welding machine
that uses the principals of the conventional TIG welding machine. But, if
the ultimate goal is to actually do TIG welding, you awill almost certainly
be dissatisfied with a buzzbox and a TIG torch.

If if it is your intention to actually do some TIG welding, wait till you
find one thats affordable. You are really good at finding very good stuff,
cheap.

Jerry (who has built several home brew TIG machines)



Wayne Cook August 29th 05 05:19 AM

On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 01:31:10 GMT, Ignoramus5361
wrote:

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 17:11:46 -0500, Wayne Cook wrote:
On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 09:57:34 -0700, Kelley Mascher
wrote:

You're correct, Wayne, I should have said something about high
frequency arc starting. It's possible that the unit in question would
work on DC. However, I'm pretty sure since, it's called a stabilizer,
it will at least supply continuous high frequency output for an AC
power source. Continuous high frequency is used to stabilize AC for
aluminum TIG welding.

I did say DC didn't I. I wasn't thinking to well last night. I've
been sick this weekend and I'm not in top form. Yes it will provide
high frequency for both AC and DC but it won't provide the welding
current if it's what I think it is. For that he'll need a stick welder
of some form preferably a AC/DC unit with remote capability.


So, then, AC/DC plus Heliweld plus gun plus gas == TIG Welder?


Pretty much. The only problem with using a AC/DC buzz box is that
they don't have remote amperage control which is while not a necessity
it is a extremely nice thing to have while TIG welding. There has been
a few people on this group with a similar setup in the past. If you
can find a little higher quality stick welder that has the provisions
for remote control then you would be better off.

Wayne Cook
Shamrock, TX
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm


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