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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Milling machine table repair



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 17th 05, 05:14 PM
Pete
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Default Milling machine table repair

I have an opportunity to purchase a milling machine that is within my budget
and will possibly with a little sweat equity be a decent machine for my "out
of control" hobby shop.The machine has Meehanite castings, DRO and X axis
power feed as well as a one shot lub system


How would one go about repairing a three inch diameter cutter mark that is
in the center of a 9X42 offshore mill table that is .050 deep.

This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?

Are there any sites that have any details on hand scraping some of the
original hand scraping marks are worn off so it likely has some wear?

I have not purchased this machine yet , but might consider it if these
flaws can be corrected.

Thanks
Pete


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  #2  
Old August 17th 05, 05:57 PM
[email protected]
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My 2 cents worth: I almost always use a vice with my mill. The only
time I have used the actual top surface to hold material is when I have
worked on some large 1/4 inch tooling plates. In all cases, an oops
like you describe would not matter.

I have used JB WELD to repair a cast steel vice that had a bunch of
drilling oops in it. None were where pressure was applied and was used
for cosmetic appearances.

My suggestion is to ignore the problem unless the sight of it bothers
you.

Paul

  #3  
Old August 17th 05, 06:20 PM
Randy Replogle
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On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 16:14:27 GMT, "Pete"
wrote:

I have an opportunity to purchase a milling machine that is within my budget
and will possibly with a little sweat equity be a decent machine for my "out
of control" hobby shop.The machine has Meehanite castings, DRO and X axis
power feed as well as a one shot lub system


How would one go about repairing a three inch diameter cutter mark that is
in the center of a 9X42 offshore mill table that is .050 deep.

This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?

Are there any sites that have any details on hand scraping some of the
original hand scraping marks are worn off so it likely has some wear?

I have not purchased this machine yet , but might consider it if these
flaws can be corrected.

Thanks
Pete


I wouldn't worry about either issue. Stone the table top to rempve any
burrs and forget about it. Backlash shouldn't be a problem either
with a DRO. You might want to create a little bit of "drag" with the
table locks if it wants to move under heavy cuts. All of this is
considering thet the price is right.
Randy
  #4  
Old August 17th 05, 06:26 PM
Gunner
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On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 16:14:27 GMT, "Pete"
wrote:

I have an opportunity to purchase a milling machine that is within my budget
and will possibly with a little sweat equity be a decent machine for my "out
of control" hobby shop.The machine has Meehanite castings, DRO and X axis
power feed as well as a one shot lub system


How would one go about repairing a three inch diameter cutter mark that is
in the center of a 9X42 offshore mill table that is .050 deep.


Why bother?

This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?


Adjust the split nuts, or replace them. If it has a dro, simply use
it. This is common on a machine that has been used a lot. No climb
milling until its fixed..but you can still do good work with it. It
also depends on what brand of machine/model it is.

Are there any sites that have any details on hand scraping some of the
original hand scraping marks are worn off so it likely has some wear?


Either it has too much wear, so dont buy it, or it has some wear, in
which case you adjust the gibs and use it. Shrug. Scraping is a PITA
for most folks and has a huge learning curve. Ask youself, are you
buying the machine to use, or to learn the scraping process on? You
can have both, depending on how much time you want between them. Ive
seen (and own) far too many machines that were taken apart to scrape,
or fix or paint...and start collecting dust and finally wind up being
scrapped or given away.

I have not purchased this machine yet , but might consider it if these
flaws can be corrected.

Thanks
Pete


You want a mint condition 62 Caddy, or do you want a car that will get
you where you want to go reliably?

Ive noticed a tendency among hobbyists..and this is mentioned with
regularity among even the good honest machine tool dealers....

Hobbyists often want minty machines, but are not willing to pay the
price for one. Lots of tire kickers pass up perfectly good machines
because the paint isnt perfect, or the supply cord needs to be
replaced, or there are holes drilled in the table. When you get
something cheap..its likely to be worth what you paid for it. So you
apply sweat equity, or learn to use it as is.

As I recall St. T-nut saying (paraphrased)...**** the paint..use the
damned thing to make stuff.

Ive offered things to people they could absolutly use, for free..and
they didnt take it because it had a spot of rust, or the paint was
****ed up or it wasnt "perfect".n Then they moaned about not being
able to find a "widget Mod 0/Mrk 2"

I guess it depends on if you want to actually do something, or simply
have hanger queens you dabble with once in a while but can show off
like a trophy wife.

Personally...Id rather make stuff.

rant/off

...nothing personal towards you btw, I just felt the need G

Gunner


The two highest achievements of the human mind are the twin concepts of "loyalty" and "duty."
Whenever these twin concepts fall into disrepute -- get out of there fast! You may possibly
save yourself, but it is too late to save that society. It is doomed. " Lazarus Long
  #5  
Old August 17th 05, 06:39 PM
Artemia Salina
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On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 16:14:27 +0000, Pete wrote:

This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?


I guess this miller is a Bridgeport clone, and so I'm not familiar with
any anti-backlash adjustments it may have because I've never owned one,
but some other milling machines have adjustable feed screw nuts. The
setup is a pair of bronze nuts that are threaded on their OD as well
as their ID. They screw into either end of a collar which is anchored
to the saddle casting (in the case of the X-axis). With the feed screw
running through both nuts, backlash is adjusted out by unscrewing one
or both of the nuts in the collar by a small amount. This has the effect
of changing the overall thread pitch of the nut/collar assembly which
reduces backlash. Its very similar to the way jam nuts work, except that
you have more control over their separation from each other.

Anyway, I'd crawl under the thing and inspect the feed nut assembly for
some type of adjustment like described above.


As for the gouge in the table, I *think* Moglice (http://www.moglice.com/)
comes in a formulation that is suitable for such repairs. Moglice is
a castable liquid way liner material. Essentially like Paul's suggestion
of using JB Weld but more purpose-made for the job.


  #6  
Old August 17th 05, 07:52 PM
Jon Elson
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Default



Artemia Salina wrote:

On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 16:14:27 +0000, Pete wrote:



This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?



I guess this miller is a Bridgeport clone, and so I'm not familiar with
any anti-backlash adjustments it may have because I've never owned one,
but some other milling machines have adjustable feed screw nuts. The
setup is a pair of bronze nuts that are threaded on their OD as well
as their ID. They screw into either end of a collar which is anchored
to the saddle casting (in the case of the X-axis).

Bridgeport's scheme is the nuts are smooth cylinders on the OD, and fit in a
close-fitting bore in the yoke. The nuts can be split with a bandsaw
into two
full cylinders (not lengthwise). There is a wide-head screw that will
squeeze
the two pieces together, and a locking screw that keeps the big one from
moving. You tighten up the big screw until the leadscrew binds at the ends,
where the wear is least, then back it off a hair. The nuts are bronze,
and hard
as hell, so when the wear becomes significant, it means the screw is worn,
too.

The X axis adjustment can be made with a flashlight and long screwdriver
without taking the machine apart. Newer machines come with the nut already
split.

Jon

  #7  
Old August 17th 05, 08:10 PM
Harold and Susan Vordos
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Default


"Pete" wrote in message
newsnJMe.33505$vj.18805@pd7tw1no...
I have an opportunity to purchase a milling machine that is within my

budget
and will possibly with a little sweat equity be a decent machine for my

"out
of control" hobby shop.The machine has Meehanite castings, DRO and X axis
power feed as well as a one shot lub system


How would one go about repairing a three inch diameter cutter mark that is
in the center of a 9X42 offshore mill table that is .050 deep.


If it was mine, and it bothered me enough, I'd bore it deeper, then plug it
with a quality piece of cast iron, then refinish the surface *very*
carefully. That wouldn't work if it breaks into the T slots. Or live
with it.


This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair or
improve this?


That is a non-issue. Machine tools have backlash----it's a fact of life
(unless they have ball screws). You learn to use the machines, regardless
of the amount. It's what separates a machinist from a wannabe.
Besides, .030" is hardly backlash. New machines often have that much.

Harold


  #8  
Old August 17th 05, 08:17 PM
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
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Default


"Harold and Susan Vordos" wrote in message
...

"Pete" wrote in message
newsnJMe.33505$vj.18805@pd7tw1no...
I have an opportunity to purchase a milling machine that is within my

budget
and will possibly with a little sweat equity be a decent machine for my

"out
of control" hobby shop.The machine has Meehanite castings, DRO and X axis
power feed as well as a one shot lub system


How would one go about repairing a three inch diameter cutter mark that
is
in the center of a 9X42 offshore mill table that is .050 deep.


If it was mine, and it bothered me enough, I'd bore it deeper, then plug
it
with a quality piece of cast iron, then refinish the surface *very*
carefully. That wouldn't work if it breaks into the T slots. Or live
with it.


This machine also has .30 backlash on the X axis. Any tricks to repair
or
improve this?


That is a non-issue. Machine tools have backlash----it's a fact of
life
(unless they have ball screws). You learn to use the machines,
regardless
of the amount. It's what separates a machinist from a wannabe.
Besides, .030" is hardly backlash. New machines often have that much.


Um, Harold? He said 3/10". Most new machines don't have that much (some
Chinkalloy junk, maybe) G.

LLoyd


  #9  
Old August 17th 05, 08:23 PM
Bob May
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I too would not worry about the cut in the bed as small parts can be put
elsewhere on the table while large parts won't worry about the hole.
The slop is something that you need to look at. If the dial moves in and
out then it is just a matter of taking up the slop in the bearings with the
adjustment system on the shaft. If the dial doesn't move then the nut
underneath is either worn (easy to replace) or needs it's adjustment done,
depending upon the machine.
From the description of the scraping, I'd suspect that the machine is pretty
well worn and will need some TLC to bring it back to specs. I'd check it
out with a dial test indicator to find out what else is wrong with the
machine.

--
Why do penguins walk so far to get to their nesting grounds?


  #10  
Old August 17th 05, 08:33 PM
Jim Stewart
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

That is a non-issue. Machine tools have backlash----it's a fact of life
(unless they have ball screws). You learn to use the machines, regardless
of the amount. It's what separates a machinist from a wannabe.


You made my day, Harold. I'm not a wannabe
anymore.

 




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