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Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Measuring Valve Guides



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 13th 05, 07:19 AM
Fred Hayek
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Default Measuring Valve Guides

I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks
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  #2  
Old July 13th 05, 09:10 AM
xmradio
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Default


"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...
I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks


Valve guide clearance can be checked with a dial indicator.

Put the valve in the guide, wiggle it. This is the valve clearance. You
could knurle the guide to take up clearance if excessive.

Those spilt types are okay, we are not talking micro fits, more like 4thou
to 6thou is okay. And some valve guides take a seal on the
top....automovtive machine shops deal with all of this...

xman



  #3  
Old July 13th 05, 10:25 AM
Harold and Susan Vordos
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"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...
I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks


Small hole gages are accurate to within a couple ten thousandths in the
hands of someone capable (machinists use them routinely in that capacity).
The big problem you're likely to encounter is elongated or tapered guides,
which can be a challenge to measure.

Harold


  #4  
Old July 13th 05, 02:31 PM
[email protected]
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Default

I use pin gauges for small holes, these can be had in set with .001"
steps. I got mine offf the scratch and dent table at MSC, they
regularly run sales on them. This will not tell you how oval the hole
is, only that the hole will pass a certain pin size.

Usually the engine overhaul manual will have specs as to how much side
play is allowable on a valve stem, mesured either with a dial indicator
or a factory jig. In used heads, the guides are usually worn tapered,
oval or both. Guide replacement is usually fairly easy, I'd still get
a machine shop to do it if this is your first head and you are actually
planning on using the head in something you want tor run for a long
time. Experience counts, here.

Stan

  #5  
Old July 13th 05, 02:48 PM
Nick Hull
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Default

In article ,
"Harold and Susan Vordos" wrote:

"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...
I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks


Small hole gages are accurate to within a couple ten thousandths in the
hands of someone capable (machinists use them routinely in that capacity).
The big problem you're likely to encounter is elongated or tapered guides,
which can be a challenge to measure.


Or you could make a cerrosafe cast and easily measure everything with
outside mikes.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
reply to nickhull99(at)hotmail.com because Earthlink has screwed up my e-mail
  #6  
Old July 13th 05, 03:19 PM
jerry wass
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Default



Nick Hull wrote:
In article ,
"Harold and Susan Vordos" wrote:


"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...

I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks


Small hole gages are accurate to within a couple ten thousandths in the
hands of someone capable (machinists use them routinely in that capacity).
The big problem you're likely to encounter is elongated or tapered guides,
which can be a challenge to measure.



Or you could make a cerrosafe cast and easily measure everything with
outside mikes.


I doubt you would get the cerrosafe out---the guides wear in an
hour-glass shape--in the plane of the rocker arm--

  #7  
Old July 13th 05, 04:02 PM
Rex B
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Default


xmradio wrote:
"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...

I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks



Valve guide clearance can be checked with a dial indicator.

Put the valve in the guide, wiggle it. This is the valve clearance. You
could knurle the guide to take up clearance if excessive.


New valve.
Used valves may have wear of their own.
  #8  
Old July 13th 05, 04:08 PM
jim rozen
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Default

In article , Fred Hayek says...

I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?


Yes. Those will work just fine. With a good feel you can
measure with those down below a thou.

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
  #9  
Old July 13th 05, 04:42 PM
yourname
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Default

Fred Hayek wrote:
I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks

Stan and Harold beat me to it; but small pin gauges are cheap, and the
guides will be tapered, big bell at the bottom on any motor.

If it has seperate guides already, send the wife out shoppping for the
day, get some dry ice for the new guides, crank up the oven and have at it.
  #10  
Old July 13th 05, 08:18 PM
Nick Hull
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Default

In article ,
jerry wass wrote:

Nick Hull wrote:
In article ,
"Harold and Susan Vordos" wrote:


"Fred Hayek" wrote in message
...

I want to check the valve guide bores in an automotive cylinder head. I've
seen some small-bore micrometers that cost several hundred dollars. These
are out of my budget. Can I get an accurate measurement with the less
expensive "split ball' type gages, some of which are sold under good names
like Starrett and Mitutoyo, and a regular flat anvil outside micromeeter?
Thanks

Small hole gages are accurate to within a couple ten thousandths in the
hands of someone capable (machinists use them routinely in that capacity).
The big problem you're likely to encounter is elongated or tapered guides,
which can be a challenge to measure.



Or you could make a cerrosafe cast and easily measure everything with
outside mikes.


I doubt you would get the cerrosafe out---the guides wear in an
hour-glass shape--in the plane of the rocker arm--


Cerrosafe is designed to shrink to assist removal, then expand later so
it is accurate 1 hour after casting.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
reply to nickhull99(at)hotmail.com because Earthlink has screwed up my e-mail
 




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