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Double sided cabinets with glass doors?



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 04, 07:35 PM
Sunflower
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Default Double sided cabinets with glass doors?

In my planned kitchen remodel I'm interested in hanging a couple of cabinets
from a soffit between the dining room and the kitchen. The lower cabinets
would serve as a buffet and the upper cabinets as lighted china display that
would be accessible from both the kitchen and the dining room. The type of
cabinets I'm wanting to use in the remodel would be the European frameless
style, (Kitchencraft or Ikea or something similar) and I know that most
cabinets get their strength and squarability from the cabinet backing--which
if I choose a door on each side would be absent. So, how would you go about
achieving the necessary strength and rigidity in double sided glass doored
cabinets? What about using glass shelving that rests on metal supports of
some kind? (I would prefer the glass shelving for the display aspect.)
Would that be strong enough? I was planning on using stock cabinets and
doing the install ourselves rather than a custom cabinet builder, but if
retrofitting stock cabinets isn't the best idea, then I think we've got
enough tools on board to buy the doors and some end panels and fabricate
whatever's needed ourselves for this one portion of the project.


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  #2  
Old October 11th 04, 08:34 PM
Charles Spitzer
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"Sunflower" wrote in message
...
In my planned kitchen remodel I'm interested in hanging a couple of
cabinets
from a soffit between the dining room and the kitchen. The lower cabinets
would serve as a buffet and the upper cabinets as lighted china display
that
would be accessible from both the kitchen and the dining room. The type
of
cabinets I'm wanting to use in the remodel would be the European frameless
style, (Kitchencraft or Ikea or something similar) and I know that most
cabinets get their strength and squarability from the cabinet
backing--which
if I choose a door on each side would be absent. So, how would you go
about
achieving the necessary strength and rigidity in double sided glass doored
cabinets? What about using glass shelving that rests on metal supports of
some kind? (I would prefer the glass shelving for the display aspect.)
Would that be strong enough? I was planning on using stock cabinets and
doing the install ourselves rather than a custom cabinet builder, but if
retrofitting stock cabinets isn't the best idea, then I think we've got
enough tools on board to buy the doors and some end panels and fabricate
whatever's needed ourselves for this one portion of the project.


try rec.woodworking, the folks who actually make cabinets can probably help
you.

otoh, there'll be little to no side pressures and all pressure would be
gravity, so you may not need too much bracing. perhaps extra thick sides
would work out ok. is there a wall on one side or another it can be attached
to?


  #3  
Old October 11th 04, 09:46 PM
William Brown
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Default

I think if you use sliding glass doors, that would add some degree of
bracing.

Sunflower wrote:

In my planned kitchen remodel I'm interested in hanging a couple of cabinets
from a soffit between the dining room and the kitchen. The lower cabinets
would serve as a buffet and the upper cabinets as lighted china display that
would be accessible from both the kitchen and the dining room. The type of
cabinets I'm wanting to use in the remodel would be the European frameless
style, (Kitchencraft or Ikea or something similar) and I know that most
cabinets get their strength and squarability from the cabinet backing--which
if I choose a door on each side would be absent. So, how would you go about
achieving the necessary strength and rigidity in double sided glass doored
cabinets? What about using glass shelving that rests on metal supports of
some kind? (I would prefer the glass shelving for the display aspect.)
Would that be strong enough? I was planning on using stock cabinets and
doing the install ourselves rather than a custom cabinet builder, but if
retrofitting stock cabinets isn't the best idea, then I think we've got
enough tools on board to buy the doors and some end panels and fabricate
whatever's needed ourselves for this one portion of the project.



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  #4  
Old October 12th 04, 01:17 AM
SQLit
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Default


"Sunflower" wrote in message
...
In my planned kitchen remodel I'm interested in hanging a couple of

cabinets
from a soffit between the dining room and the kitchen. The lower cabinets
would serve as a buffet and the upper cabinets as lighted china display

that
would be accessible from both the kitchen and the dining room. The type

of
cabinets I'm wanting to use in the remodel would be the European frameless
style, (Kitchencraft or Ikea or something similar) and I know that most
cabinets get their strength and squarability from the cabinet

backing--which
if I choose a door on each side would be absent. So, how would you go

about
achieving the necessary strength and rigidity in double sided glass doored
cabinets? What about using glass shelving that rests on metal supports of
some kind? (I would prefer the glass shelving for the display aspect.)
Would that be strong enough? I was planning on using stock cabinets and
doing the install ourselves rather than a custom cabinet builder, but if
retrofitting stock cabinets isn't the best idea, then I think we've got
enough tools on board to buy the doors and some end panels and fabricate
whatever's needed ourselves for this one portion of the project.


Just buy a cabinet with doors on both sides. These are made to be screwed to
the ceiling and are stronger than regular wall cabinets. Make sure that the
hinges mount to the inside. Remove the doors and get started.
I put new cabinets in my last home and the bozo GC forgot the microwave
cabinet.
He took off the doors of an 42 inch upper and said he would get them cut
down for me.
Never saw him again. Thats ok I owed him over $4k when he took the powder.
Check with www.usindustrialfasteners.com or call 800-289-5386. They have
the gold hinges for $3 a set instead of $14 at the box stores. Measure the
glass and buy what they call double strength same for shelves. If you like
me you will screw up and make the glass to big. So I bought an cheap Ryobi
belt sander and set it up on the table saw and reduced and removed the burrs
with it. No special belts I used 80, 120. Took a few belts but I had 4 glass
doors, with magnetic closers and 4 shelves and including the sander and
belts had less than $300 in it. Still got the sander. Take your time glass
goes slow.
Measure the inside dimension and then reduce by 1/8 top to bottom and 1/4
hinge to latch. I also bought some halogen lights and put them into the
ceiling of the cabinets.
Made sure that those lights were on when the realtors came to show the
place. I had styles in the middle so I was able to support the shelves
from the ends and the middle.
Would not put a lot of weight on them but I wanted to show off keep sakes
that I did not want to dust every day.




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