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Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 11th 03, 02:39 PM
Dave Solly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows have
about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each window!! I
picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows using a dental pick.
The remaining cavity around the glass is about 1/16" wide and about 1/32"
deep. So far, I've spent about an hour shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of
glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing compound ("for use with metal framed
windows") and a narrow putty knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing
compond, but it sticks to my hand, and even if I could get a good string,
it would probably break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.

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  #2  
Old November 11th 03, 03:04 PM
Dave Solly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

Dave Solly wrote in
:

I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows
have about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each
window!! I picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows
using a dental pick. The remaining cavity around the glass is about
1/16" wide and about 1/32" deep. So far, I've spent about an hour
shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing
compound ("for use with metal framed windows") and a narrow putty
knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing compond, but it sticks to
my hand, and even if I could get a good string, it would probably
break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.



Opps, almost forgot, that's just in inside. Another 180 sides per window
for the outside.

Dave
  #3  
Old November 11th 03, 03:38 PM
John McGaw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

"Dave Solly" wrote in message
...
I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows have
about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each window!! I
picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows using a dental

pick.
The remaining cavity around the glass is about 1/16" wide and about 1/32"
deep. So far, I've spent about an hour shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of
glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing compound ("for use with metal framed
windows") and a narrow putty knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing
compond, but it sticks to my hand, and even if I could get a good string,
it would probably break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.

Taking it to mean that you are writing about sealing the voids between the
lead came and the glass, you will be forever doing it using regular glazing
compound if you are trying to neatly stuff it in the cracks one-by-one. Take
a look at http://www.inlandcraft.com/howto/page24.htm and see if this looks
more practical. There are several different brands of cement available from
your friendly local "stained glass" studio but the method is similar for any
of them. This is roughly the method I learned in a leaded glass class I
took: manually smear regular glazing compound over the panel's seams and use
a stiff brush to force it into the cracks and then use the whiting and
another brush to scrub everything clean.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]

Return address will not work. Please
reply in group or through my website:
http://johnmcgaw.com

  #4  
Old November 11th 03, 04:32 PM
Dave Solly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

"John McGaw" wrote in news:Jk7sb.14$iB2.9
@bignews3.bellsouth.net:

http://www.inlandcraft.com/howto/page24.htm


Thanks for the reply John. That sounds interesting, except it might not be
practacial for my situation. The windows are about 5 feet tall, and about 2
1/2 feet wide. I can't take the windows out of the wall, so I would think
the cement would run all over the place. I'll have to see if there's a
less messy way of doing this.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks.

Dave
  #5  
Old November 11th 03, 05:01 PM
cyber
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

In article ,
Dave Solly wrote:

Dave Solly wrote in
:

I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows
have about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each
window!! I picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows
using a dental pick. The remaining cavity around the glass is about
1/16" wide and about 1/32" deep. So far, I've spent about an hour
shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing
compound ("for use with metal framed windows") and a narrow putty
knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing compond, but it sticks to
my hand, and even if I could get a good string, it would probably
break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.



Opps, almost forgot, that's just in inside. Another 180 sides per window
for the outside.

Dave


I installed a home-made stained glass window in an exterior door. And
to make it stronger and weather tight, I put a sheet of clear glass on
either side. adds some R-value too.
good luck!
g
"If I can not dance, I want no part in your revolution." Emma Goldman
  #6  
Old November 11th 03, 05:15 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows



Dave Solly wrote:
Dave Solly wrote in
:


I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows
have about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each
window!! I picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows
using a dental pick. The remaining cavity around the glass is about
1/16" wide and about 1/32" deep. So far, I've spent about an hour
shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing
compound ("for use with metal framed windows") and a narrow putty
knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing compond, but it sticks to
my hand, and even if I could get a good string, it would probably
break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.




Opps, almost forgot, that's just in inside. Another 180 sides per window
for the outside.

Dave


You want sympathy? Because you're unlucky enough to have leaded windows
in your house? ) I dabbled in stained glass, but never got to the
finish stage. Sewing machines are faster ) You have lead came?
Straight or curved joints? How many windows? One story, accessible
inside and outside?

I did a quick search, and found a lot of places selling AmChem Stained
Glass Putty. Found one selling DAP 33 for stained glass, others selling
DAP 1012 for stained glass. DAP's website has tech data; says not to
use 1012 for "channel glazing", and 33 not recommended for stained
glass. Off the top of my head, I'd recommend AmChem. Never used it. )

  #7  
Old November 11th 03, 05:48 PM
Dave Solly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

" wrote in
:



Dave Solly wrote:
Dave Solly wrote in
:


I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows
have about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each
window!! I picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows
using a dental pick. The remaining cavity around the glass is about
1/16" wide and about 1/32" deep. So far, I've spent about an hour
shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing
compound ("for use with metal framed windows") and a narrow putty
knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing compond, but it sticks
to my hand, and even if I could get a good string, it would probably
break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.




Opps, almost forgot, that's just in inside. Another 180 sides per
window for the outside.

Dave


You want sympathy? Because you're unlucky enough to have leaded
windows in your house? ) I dabbled in stained glass, but never got
to the finish stage. Sewing machines are faster ) You have lead
came? Straight or curved joints? How many windows? One story,
accessible inside and outside?

I did a quick search, and found a lot of places selling AmChem Stained
Glass Putty. Found one selling DAP 33 for stained glass, others
selling DAP 1012 for stained glass. DAP's website has tech data; says
not to use 1012 for "channel glazing", and 33 not recommended for
stained glass. Off the top of my head, I'd recommend AmChem. Never
used it. )



Hummm, thanks Norminn. Maybe I need to visit DAP's website.

Dave
  #8  
Old November 11th 03, 07:11 PM
John McGaw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

"Dave Solly" wrote in message
...
"John McGaw" wrote in news:Jk7sb.14$iB2.9
@bignews3.bellsouth.net:

http://www.inlandcraft.com/howto/page24.htm


Thanks for the reply John. That sounds interesting, except it might not be
practacial for my situation. The windows are about 5 feet tall, and about

2
1/2 feet wide. I can't take the windows out of the wall, so I would think
the cement would run all over the place. I'll have to see if there's a
less messy way of doing this.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks.

Dave


All I can suggest is that, since the windows were certainly not created in
place they must have previously been installed. And what can be installed
can be de-installed (but not always easily of course). Given the size of the
windows though, it might be safer for mind and body to call in a
professional glass company and have them do the task. Especially if the
glass has some serious monetary value. The normal method of
cementing/sealing leaded glass pretty much demands that the panel be flat so
that the whiting can be put on and then scrubbed off -- this seems to carry
across all the commercial cements and glazing compounds.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]

Return address will not work. Please
reply in group or through my website:
http://johnmcgaw.com

  #9  
Old November 11th 03, 08:28 PM
Joseph Meehan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

Fix it right and it will be good for 50-100 years. Try to get by with a
quick easy fix and you will be back at it in a year or three.

Best bet on a window that size is to have a pro do it. It may mean
disassembly and rebuilding it. Check the yellow pages for stain glass.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Dave Solly" wrote in message
...
I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows have
about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each window!! I
picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows using a dental

pick.
The remaining cavity around the glass is about 1/16" wide and about 1/32"
deep. So far, I've spent about an hour shoving the glaze into 6 pieces of
glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing compound ("for use with metal framed
windows") and a narrow putty knife. I tried forming a "string" of glazing
compond, but it sticks to my hand, and even if I could get a good string,
it would probably break apart because it would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.



  #10  
Old November 11th 03, 09:52 PM
Dave Solly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Best way to re-glaze leaded glass windows

"John McGaw" wrote in
:

"Dave Solly" wrote in message
...
I have leaded glass windows that need to be re-glazed. These windows
have about 45 3X3 inch pieces of glass. That's 180 sides for each
window!! I picked out as much of the old glazing from the windows
using a dental

pick.
The remaining cavity around the glass is about 1/16" wide and about
1/32" deep. So far, I've spent about an hour shoving the glaze into 6
pieces of glass. I am using DAP 1012 glazing compound ("for use with
metal framed windows") and a narrow putty knife. I tried forming a
"string" of glazing compond, but it sticks to my hand, and even if I
could get a good string, it would probably break apart because it
would be too thin.

There has to be an easier way. Can anyone give me some hints?

Thanks.

Dave
email doesn't work.

Taking it to mean that you are writing about sealing the voids between
the lead came and the glass, you will be forever doing it using
regular glazing compound if you are trying to neatly stuff it in the
cracks one-by-one. Take a look at
http://www.inlandcraft.com/howto/page24.htm and see if this looks more
practical. There are several different brands of cement available from
your friendly local "stained glass" studio but the method is similar
for any of them. This is roughly the method I learned in a leaded
glass class I took: manually smear regular glazing compound over the
panel's seams and use a stiff brush to force it into the cracks and
then use the whiting and another brush to scrub everything clean.


John, after re-reading the web page above, and looking at the window
again, it is clear to me that cement was used initially. Unfortunately,
the windows were installed by nailing in a nail flange (I hope I used the
right term for the sheet metal that goes around a window and then nailed
to the wood), then the nail flange was covered with brick. The only way I
can see to remove the windows is to remove the brick around the window
and pull the nails out, or cut the window out with a saws-all. Neither of
these options is going to happen grin.

A question for you though, can I use the stained glass cement in a very
thick mixture to brush it into the cracks? After it dries, what would you
suggest I use to clean the windows to get the cement residue off, and
make the joints look clean.

Thanks.

Dave
 




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